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Whenever a crime is committed, law enforcement officers are typically the first to arrive on the scene and to interact with victims. As a result, police officers have more contact with crime victims in the immediate aftermath of a crime than any other criminal justice professional. This makes their role critical and puts them in a unique position to meet victims’ needs immediately after the crime has occurred and encourage and facilitate the victim’s participation in the criminal justice system. An officer’s initial response to a victim will have a long-lasting impact on that individual’s experience of the justice system and his or her participation in the investigation and prosecution of the crime.

 

Each year, the week of May 15th is recognized as National Police Week in honor of the law enforcement personnel who provide the first crucial services to crime victims and in celebration of their brave efforts to keep us all safe.

 

The following resources are provided for law enforcement professionals.


OVC and OVC-Sponsored Publications

2018 National Crime Victims' Rights Week (NCVRW) Resource Guide (2018) OVC, 3 pages, NCJ 251052.
The 2018 NCVRW Resource Guide provides a wealth of materials for promoting public awareness campaigns for NCVRW and throughout the year. The guide includes planning tips, artwork, crime and victimization fact sheets, and more. Help OVC Expand the Circle: Reach All Victims.
Abstract | HTML
 
It's Not an "Accident": It's a Crime! (April 2018) OVC-Sponsored, 2 pages, NCJ 251642.
All victims of crime should be treated with dignity and respect, including victims of drunk driving crashes. This brochure provides information to law enforcement officers on how to respond to DUI crash victims and the services that may be available to them, including crime victim compensation. This resource was produced by the National Sheriffs' Association with funding support from OVC.
Abstract | PDF
 
DUI Crashes: Real Crimes, Real Victims (October 2017) OVC-Sponsored, 3 pages, NCJ 250276.
Drunk driving crashes are crimes, not "accidents." One person is killed in an alcohol impaired driving crash every 53 minutes. This roll call video, supported by a grant from the OVC, addresses the need for law enforcement to respond to and interact with DUI crash victims in a victim-centered way, with all the referrals, support, and resources due victims of a violent crime.
Abstract | Video
 
Vision 21: Law Enforcement and the Communities They Serve (June 2017) OVC, Fact Sheet, OVC Fact Sheets, 2 pages, NCJ 250737.
This fact sheet discusses an OVC-sponsored project that is designed to assist law enforcement in developing evidence-based and trauma-informed response strategies in the wake of law enforcement-involved shootings and other high-profile incidents of violence. Additionally, the project will develop and disseminate comprehensive, expert technical assistance resources for law enforcement on trauma-informed culture and practice.
Abstract | PDF
Part Of the OVC Fact Sheets Series
 
Developing an Elder Abuse Case Review Multidisciplinary Team in Your Community (May 2017) OVC-Sponsored, Grant, 4 pages, NCJ 250736.
This resource facilitates the development and growth of multidisciplinary teams to address elder abuse cases. It also provides information about team structures and functions, along with common issues that arise with developing a case review team.
Abstract | HTML
 

OJP Publications

Enhancing Police Responses to Children Exposed to Violence: A Toolkit for Law Enforcement (February 2017) OJJDP-Sponsored, Electronic Document, 68 pages, NCJ 250768.
This toolkit provides practical resources to assist law enforcement agencies in building or enhancing effective operational responses to children exposed to violence (with or without a mental health partner).
Abstract | PDF
 
Examining Criminal Justice Responses to and Help-Seeking Patterns of Sexual Violence Survivors With Disabilities (June 2016) NIJ-Sponsored, Grant, 87 pages, NCJ 250196.
The goal of this study used is to better understand the criminal justice experience of persons with disabilities that report a sexual assault or rape to the authorities. Results suggest that current criminal justice structures are not sufficient to provide support for one of the highest-risk adult populations for sexual assault and victimization in the U.S.
Abstract | PDF
 
Legal Issues Related to Elder Abuse: A Pocket Guide for Law Enforcement (2014) BJA-Sponsored, 58 pages, NCJ 248541.
This guide provides legal concepts, documents, and tools that may be misused to commit elder abuse or used properly to remedy it. Also presented are issues and actions that justice system professionals should consider if they suspect elder abuse has occurred.
Abstract | PDF
 
Understanding the Organization, Operation, and Victimization Process of Labor Trafficking in the United States (October 2014) NIJ-Sponsored, Grant, 306 pages, NCJ 248461.
This report explores patterns of labor trafficking in the U.S., and found that trafficking occurs in multiple industries, including agriculture, hospitality, construction, and restaurants. The report verified that labor trafficking usually goes unreported, and law enforcement often have difficulty distinguishing labor trafficking from other workplace exploitation. Policy and practice implications of this research for federal and local law enforcement and victims' service agencies are outlined.
Abstract | PDF
 
Recognizing When a Child's Injury or Illness Is Caused by Abuse (July 2014) OJJDP, Portable Guide, OJJDP Portable Guides to Investigating Child Abuse, 28 pages, NCJ 243908.
This guide provides information about the many indicators of child maltreatment and abuse to help first responders and investigators differentiate between physical abuse and accidental injury.

Part Of the OJJDP Portable Guides to Investigating Child Abuse Series Abstract | PDF
 

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Whenever a crime is committed, law enforcement officers are typically the first to arrive on the scene and to interact with victims. As a result, police officers have more contact with crime victims in the immediate aftermath of a crime than any other criminal justice professional. This makes their role critical and puts them in a unique position to meet victims’ needs immediately after the crime has occurred and encourage and facilitate the victim’s participation in the criminal justice system. An officer’s initial response to a victim will have a long-lasting impact on that individual’s experience of the justice system and his or her participation in the investigation and prosecution of the crime.

 

Each year, the week of May 15th is recognized as National Police Week in honor of the law enforcement personnel who provide the first crucial services to crime victims and in celebration of their brave efforts to keep us all safe.

 

The following resources are provided for law enforcement professionals.


Whenever a crime is committed, law enforcement officers are typically the first to arrive on the scene and to interact with victims. As a result, police officers have more contact with crime victims in the immediate aftermath of a crime than any other criminal justice professional. This makes their role critical and puts them in a unique position to meet victims’ needs immediately after the crime has occurred and encourage and facilitate the victim’s participation in the criminal justice system. An officer’s initial response to a victim will have a long-lasting impact on that individual’s experience of the justice system and his or her participation in the investigation and prosecution of the crime.

 

Each year, the week of May 15th is recognized as National Police Week in honor of the law enforcement personnel who provide the first crucial services to crime victims and in celebration of their brave efforts to keep us all safe.

 

The following resources are provided for law enforcement professionals.


Each month the Nation's experts answer your questions about best practices in victim services. Below are upcoming and most recent session discussions in this topic:

On Jul 13 2016 at 2:00PM, Pamela Todd, Ph.D., CEO and founder of Ray of Hope Foster Care, Inc.,, and Diane Payne, owner of Justice for Native Children Consulting, hosted a discussion on Support and Services for Drug-Endangered Children

On May 14 2015 at 2:00PM, Raymond Goins, Sergeant, Norman (Oklahoma) Police Department, and Michael Milnor, Professor of Criminal Justice at Liberty University, hosted a discussion on Impact of Crime Scene Clean Up

On May 5 2015 at 2:00PM, Cris Sullivan, Director of the Research Consortium on Gender-Based Violence and Professor of Ecological/Community Psychology at Michigan State Univers, and Keri Darling, founder and Director/Trainer of DVAS, Deaf Vermonters Advocacy Services, hosted a discussion on Build Your Own Body of Evidence-Based Knowledge

On Feb 25 2015 at 2:00PM, Jennifer Burkmire, advocate for children and a contract consultant for nonprofit organizations that provide social services, and Cynthia King, President of King & Associates, Inc, hosted a discussion on Developing an Effective Multidisciplinary Team

On Oct 15 2014 at 2:00PM, Steven Siegel, Director of the Special Programs Unit of the Denver District Attorney’s Office, and Cindy Southworth, Vice President of Development and Innovation at the National Network to End Domestic Violence, hosted a discussion on Responding to and Avoiding Crime Using Technology

Whenever a crime is committed, law enforcement officers are typically the first to arrive on the scene and to interact with victims. As a result, police officers have more contact with crime victims in the immediate aftermath of a crime than any other criminal justice professional. This makes their role critical and puts them in a unique position to meet victims’ needs immediately after the crime has occurred and encourage and facilitate the victim’s participation in the criminal justice system. An officer’s initial response to a victim will have a long-lasting impact on that individual’s experience of the justice system and his or her participation in the investigation and prosecution of the crime.

 

Each year, the week of May 15th is recognized as National Police Week in honor of the law enforcement personnel who provide the first crucial services to crime victims and in celebration of their brave efforts to keep us all safe.

 

The following resources are provided for law enforcement professionals.


When may I submit my nomination for the National Crime Victims' Service Awards?
Nominations for the 2018 National Crime Victims' Service Awards are now closed. For more information... Read More

How can I find out about grants available from OVC?
OVC grant solicitations are posted to the Current Funding Opportunities section of our website and o... Read More

How can I order the National Crime Victims' Rights Week (NCVRW) Theme Poster?
A limited number of theme posters and resource kits (includes copies of this year's Theme Poster and... Read More

How can I order the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) DVD, Victims with Disabilities: A Forensic Interview-Training Techniques for Interviewing Victims with Communication or Cognitive Disabilities Training Kit, NCJ 234678?
The Victims with Disabilities: A Forensic Interview-Training Techniques for Interviewing Victims wit... Read More

How can I order the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) DVD, First Response to Victims of Crime, NCJ 211619?
The First Response to Victims of Crime DVD, NCJ 211619, can be ordered through the Shopping Cart sec... Read More

More FAQs

Whenever a crime is committed, law enforcement officers are typically the first to arrive on the scene and to interact with victims. As a result, police officers have more contact with crime victims in the immediate aftermath of a crime than any other criminal justice professional. This makes their role critical and puts them in a unique position to meet victims’ needs immediately after the crime has occurred and encourage and facilitate the victim’s participation in the criminal justice system. An officer’s initial response to a victim will have a long-lasting impact on that individual’s experience of the justice system and his or her participation in the investigation and prosecution of the crime.

 

Each year, the week of May 15th is recognized as National Police Week in honor of the law enforcement personnel who provide the first crucial services to crime victims and in celebration of their brave efforts to keep us all safe.

 

The following resources are provided for law enforcement professionals.


No funding records found relevant to this topic.

More Funding Opportunities

Whenever a crime is committed, law enforcement officers are typically the first to arrive on the scene and to interact with victims. As a result, police officers have more contact with crime victims in the immediate aftermath of a crime than any other criminal justice professional. This makes their role critical and puts them in a unique position to meet victims’ needs immediately after the crime has occurred and encourage and facilitate the victim’s participation in the criminal justice system. An officer’s initial response to a victim will have a long-lasting impact on that individual’s experience of the justice system and his or her participation in the investigation and prosecution of the crime.

 

Each year, the week of May 15th is recognized as National Police Week in honor of the law enforcement personnel who provide the first crucial services to crime victims and in celebration of their brave efforts to keep us all safe.

 

The following resources are provided for law enforcement professionals.


Publications

OVC and OVC-Sponsored Publications

2018 National Crime Victims' Rights Week (NCVRW) Resource Guide (2018) OVC, 3 pages, NCJ 251052. The 2018 NCVRW Resource Guide provides a wealth of materials for promoting public awareness campaigns for NCVRW and throughout the year. The guide includes planning tips, artwork, crime and victimization fact sheets, and more. Help OVC Expand the Circle: Reach All Victims.
Abstract | HTML
 
It's Not an "Accident": It's a Crime! (April 2018) OVC-Sponsored, 2 pages, NCJ 251642. All victims of crime should be treated with dignity and respect, including victims of drunk driving crashes. This brochure provides information to law enforcement officers on how to respond to DUI crash victims and the services that may be available to them, including crime victim compensation. This resource was produced by the National Sheriffs' Association with funding support from OVC.
Abstract | PDF
 
DUI Crashes: Real Crimes, Real Victims (October 2017) OVC-Sponsored, 3 pages, NCJ 250276. Drunk driving crashes are crimes, not "accidents." One person is killed in an alcohol impaired driving crash every 53 minutes. This roll call video, supported by a grant from the OVC, addresses the need for law enforcement to respond to and interact with DUI crash victims in a victim-centered way, with all the referrals, support, and resources due victims of a violent crime.
Abstract | Video
 
Vision 21: Law Enforcement and the Communities They Serve (June 2017) OVC, Fact Sheet, OVC Fact Sheets, 2 pages, NCJ 250737. This fact sheet discusses an OVC-sponsored project that is designed to assist law enforcement in developing evidence-based and trauma-informed response strategies in the wake of law enforcement-involved shootings and other high-profile incidents of violence. Additionally, the project will develop and disseminate comprehensive, expert technical assistance resources for law enforcement on trauma-informed culture and practice.
Abstract | PDF
Part Of the OVC Fact Sheets Series
 
Developing an Elder Abuse Case Review Multidisciplinary Team in Your Community (May 2017) OVC-Sponsored, Grant, 4 pages, NCJ 250736. This resource facilitates the development and growth of multidisciplinary teams to address elder abuse cases. It also provides information about team structures and functions, along with common issues that arise with developing a case review team.
Abstract | HTML
 

OJP Publications

Enhancing Police Responses to Children Exposed to Violence: A Toolkit for Law Enforcement (February 2017) OJJDP-Sponsored, Electronic Document, 68 pages, NCJ 250768. This toolkit provides practical resources to assist law enforcement agencies in building or enhancing effective operational responses to children exposed to violence (with or without a mental health partner).
Abstract | PDF
 
Examining Criminal Justice Responses to and Help-Seeking Patterns of Sexual Violence Survivors With Disabilities (June 2016) NIJ-Sponsored, Grant, 87 pages, NCJ 250196. The goal of this study used is to better understand the criminal justice experience of persons with disabilities that report a sexual assault or rape to the authorities. Results suggest that current criminal justice structures are not sufficient to provide support for one of the highest-risk adult populations for sexual assault and victimization in the U.S.
Abstract | PDF
 
Legal Issues Related to Elder Abuse: A Pocket Guide for Law Enforcement (2014) BJA-Sponsored, 58 pages, NCJ 248541. This guide provides legal concepts, documents, and tools that may be misused to commit elder abuse or used properly to remedy it. Also presented are issues and actions that justice system professionals should consider if they suspect elder abuse has occurred.
Abstract | PDF
 
Understanding the Organization, Operation, and Victimization Process of Labor Trafficking in the United States (October 2014) NIJ-Sponsored, Grant, 306 pages, NCJ 248461. This report explores patterns of labor trafficking in the U.S., and found that trafficking occurs in multiple industries, including agriculture, hospitality, construction, and restaurants. The report verified that labor trafficking usually goes unreported, and law enforcement often have difficulty distinguishing labor trafficking from other workplace exploitation. Policy and practice implications of this research for federal and local law enforcement and victims' service agencies are outlined.
Abstract | PDF
 
Recognizing When a Child's Injury or Illness Is Caused by Abuse (July 2014) OJJDP, Portable Guide, OJJDP Portable Guides to Investigating Child Abuse, 28 pages, NCJ 243908. This guide provides information about the many indicators of child maltreatment and abuse to help first responders and investigators differentiate between physical abuse and accidental injury.
Part Of the OJJDP Portable Guides to Investigating Child Abuse Series
Abstract | PDF
 

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Related Resources

OVC Funded Resources

Enhancing Law Enforcement Response to Victims
For over a decade, the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) has collaborated with OVC to promote crime victim rights and facilitate law enforcement's ability to effectively address victim needs. One of the key milestones of this collaboration includes the 21st Century Strategy for Enhancing Law Enforcement Response to Victims, consisting of the Strategy, the Implementation Guide, the Resource Toolkit, and the Training Supplemental. This Web site, which captures the 21st Century Strategy and a number of other victim-related materials and publications, serves as a unique law enforcement resource center for enhanced victim response.
 
Office for Victims of Crime (OVC): Human Trafficking
OVC’s human trafficking Web site contains a wide range of information including resources and research from the Federal Government, publications and products from OVC, local and national direct assistance information, and related funding opportunities for victims and survivors of human trafficking, victim service providers, law enforcement, and allied professionals.
 
Office for Victims of Crime Training and Technical Assistance Center (OVC TTAC): Tribal Victim Assistance
This OVC TTAC resource provides information and tools to support the efforts of tribal victim advocates, prosecutors, law enforcement officers, and others to develop a victim-centered response to crime victims in tribal communities.
 
The Use of Technology to Stalk: An Online Course
Produced by the Stalking Resource Center of the National Center for Victims of Crime with funding from OVC, this free self-paced, interactive online training will help increase the ability of criminal justice professionals and victim service providers to recognize how stalkers use technology and, ultimately, enhance their ability to work with victims of stalking. This course highlights: how stalkers use technologies to locate, harass, and surveil their victims; steps to assist in investigating stalking crimes; and how to support victims of stalking.
 

Federal Resources

Elder Justice Initiative
This site serves as a resource for victims of elder abuse and financial exploitation and their families, practitioners who serve them, law enforcement agencies and prosecutors, and researchers seeking to understand and address this silent epidemic plaguing our nation's elders. Victims and family members will find information about how to report and get assistance for victims of elder abuse and financial exploitation in all 50 states and the U.S. territories.
 
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
The FBI is the principal investigative arm of the U.S. Department of Justice. Its mission is to protect the United States from terrorist and foreign intelligence activities; investigate violations of federal criminal law; and provide assistance to federal, state, local, and international agencies.
 
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI): Uniform Crime Reporting
The Uniform Crime Reporting (UCR) Program was conceived in 1929 by the International Association of Chiefs of Police to meet a need for reliable, uniform crime statistics for the nation. In 1930, the FBI was tasked with collecting, publishing, and archiving those statistics. Today, several annual statistical publications, such as the comprehensive Crime in the United States, are produced from data provided by nearly 17,000 law enforcement agencies across the United States.
 
National Sex Offender Public Web Site
This online, searchable database of sex offenders is the result of a cooperative effort between the state agencies hosting public sexual offender registries and the Federal Government. The Federal site centralizes the different sex offender registries built and maintained by State and territories and provides real-time access to public sex offender data nationwide with a single Internet search. This Web site allows parents and concerned citizens to search existing public state and territory sex offender registries beyond their own communities.
 
World Trade Center Health Program
This program monitors, screens, treats and supports responders who responded to the disaster site at the World Trade Center in New York City and who may have been affected physically or mentally by their service. The site is designed to provide information related to all aspects of the World Trade Center Health Program, to highlight new developments in the program as they occur, and to help individuals find information of particular interest for them.
 

Non-Governmental Resources

Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE)
ACFE is an anti-fraud organization and provider of anti-fraud training and education.
 
International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators
IACLEA promotes campus safety by providing educational resources, advocacy, and professional development.
 
NetSmartz Workshop
NetSmartz is an age-appropriate resource to keep kids and teens safe on the internet.
 
Sexual Assault Family Violence Investigators Course (SAFVIC)
The SAFVIC Program is designed to provide law enforcement officers with the tools they need to effectively investigate and prevent sexual assault and family violence.
 
We Regret to Inform You ... (Death Notification Training)
The Federal Bureau of Investigation, in partnership with Penn State University, created this free web based training for law enforcement agencies and other first responders responsible for notifying the family members of those who have died suddenly as a result of a crime, an accident, a suicide, or other type of incident. The training is designed to enhance the professionalism, dignity, and compassion of those tasked with delivering death notifications, including: law enforcement, victim advocates, coroners, medical examiners, chaplains, hospital staff, and others.
 

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Web Forum Discussions

Each month the Nation's experts answer your questions about best practices in victim services. Below are upcoming and most recent session discussions in this topic:

On Jul 13 2016 at 2:00PM, Pamela Todd, Ph.D., CEO and founder of Ray of Hope Foster Care, Inc.,, and Diane Payne, owner of Justice for Native Children Consulting, hosted a discussion on Support and Services for Drug-Endangered Children

On May 14 2015 at 2:00PM, Raymond Goins, Sergeant, Norman (Oklahoma) Police Department, and Michael Milnor, Professor of Criminal Justice at Liberty University, hosted a discussion on Impact of Crime Scene Clean Up

On May 5 2015 at 2:00PM, Cris Sullivan, Director of the Research Consortium on Gender-Based Violence and Professor of Ecological/Community Psychology at Michigan State Univers, and Keri Darling, founder and Director/Trainer of DVAS, Deaf Vermonters Advocacy Services, hosted a discussion on Build Your Own Body of Evidence-Based Knowledge

On Feb 25 2015 at 2:00PM, Jennifer Burkmire, advocate for children and a contract consultant for nonprofit organizations that provide social services, and Cynthia King, President of King & Associates, Inc, hosted a discussion on Developing an Effective Multidisciplinary Team

On Oct 15 2014 at 2:00PM, Steven Siegel, Director of the Special Programs Unit of the Denver District Attorney’s Office, and Cindy Southworth, Vice President of Development and Innovation at the National Network to End Domestic Violence, hosted a discussion on Responding to and Avoiding Crime Using Technology


FAQs

When may I submit my nomination for the National Crime Victims' Service Awards?
Nominations for the 2018 National Crime Victims' Service Awards are now closed. For more information... Read More

How can I find out about grants available from OVC?
OVC grant solicitations are posted to the Current Funding Opportunities section of our website and o... Read More

How can I order the National Crime Victims' Rights Week (NCVRW) Theme Poster?
A limited number of theme posters and resource kits (includes copies of this year's Theme Poster and... Read More

How can I order the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) DVD, Victims with Disabilities: A Forensic Interview-Training Techniques for Interviewing Victims with Communication or Cognitive Disabilities Training Kit, NCJ 234678?
The Victims with Disabilities: A Forensic Interview-Training Techniques for Interviewing Victims wit... Read More

How can I order the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) DVD, First Response to Victims of Crime, NCJ 211619?
The First Response to Victims of Crime DVD, NCJ 211619, can be ordered through the Shopping Cart sec... Read More

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Funding

No funding records found relevant to this topic.

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EventsDirectoryE-Mail Updates
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National Calendar of Crime Victim Assistance-Related Events
Upcoming Event(s)
2018 VOCA National Training Conference
Savannah, GA
08/07/2018-08/09/2018

30th Annual Crimes Against Children Conference
Dallas, TX
08/13/2018-08/16/2018

National Indian Nations Conference: Justice for Victims of Crime
Agua Caliente Reservation, CA
12/05/2018-12/07/2018

Online Directory of Crime Victims Services.