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Grief & Bereavement

  • Publications (13)
  • Resources (5)
  • Forum Discussions (5)
  • FAQs (2)
  • Funding (0)
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Grief is an individual’s natural reaction to the loss of someone or something that holds significant meaning. Grief is not a single emotion, but rather a wide range of intense emotions accompanied by physical and behavioral reactions.

Grieving is a personal experience that is often physically and emotionally draining. When a loss is sudden or violent, it may invoke traumatic reactions, such as intense fear, numbness, helplessness, or horror.

Grief and bereavement, which describes the period of grieving, can often become more complicated after a traumatic incident, such as a homicide. These situations may prolong the intensity and duration of emotional reactions. It’s important to recognize the amount of support a grieving person receives from their family, friends, and community is critical to how successfully they will cope with grief.

The following organizations, publications, and related resources provide additional information on grief and bereavement.


OVC and OVC-Sponsored Publications

2018 National Crime Victims' Rights Week (NCVRW) Resource Guide (2018) OVC, 3 pages, NCJ 251052.
The 2018 NCVRW Resource Guide provides a wealth of materials for promoting public awareness campaigns for NCVRW and throughout the year. The guide includes planning tips, artwork, crime and victimization fact sheets, and more. Help OVC Expand the Circle: Reach All Victims.
Abstract | HTML
 
Victim Impact: Listen and Learn Curriculum (2016) OVC, 312 pages, NCJ 224257.
This OVC-funded curriculum is geared toward helping offenders to become aware of the impact that crime has on victims and then to take responsibility and make amends for their actions. The online-only curriculum consists of 13 units, built around 10 core crime topics: property crime, assault, robbery, hate and bias, gang violence, sexual assault, child abuse and neglect, domestic violence, drunk and impaired driving, and homicide, plus chapters on implementing the program, the victim experience and making amends to victims. Victims and survivors speak about their experiences in the accompanying video clips.
Abstract | PDF (Facilitator Manual, Part 1) | PDF (Facilitator Manual, Part 2) | PDF (Participant Workbook) | HTML
 
Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services Final Report (May 2013) OVC, Report, 60 pages, NCJ 239957.
The Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services initiative was launched by OVC in fall 2010 to expand the vision and impact of the crime victim assistance field. This Final Report provides a set of findings and broad recommendations, informed by stakeholder forums and literature reviews, that form a framework for strategic, transformative change. The Final Report outlines ways the field can overcome the obstacles it faces and change how it meets victims' needs and addresses those who perpetrate crime.
Abstract | PDF (Full Report) | PDF (Summary & Recommendations) | PDF (At a Glance Fact Sheet)
 
Serving Survivors of Homicide Victims During Cold Case Investigations: A Guide for Developing a Law Enforcement Protocol (August 2011) OVC-Sponsored, Grant, 55 pages, NCJ 236082.
Through funding from OVC, the National Sheriffs' Association, Justice Solutions, and the National Organization of Parents Of Murdered Children, Inc., developed this publication which identifies and discusses how law enforcement agencies can develop protocols for best serving survivors of homicide during cold case investigations.
Abstract | PDF
 
What You Can Do if You Are a Victim of Crime (2010) OVC, Fact Sheet, OVC Fact Sheets, BC000790.
This OVC brochure explains the rights of victims of crime and the compensation and assistance resources available to them. It also lists national organizations that help victims find information or obtain referrals.
PDF | HTML
Part Of the OVC Fact Sheets Series
 

OJP Publications

What About Me? Coping With the Abduction of a Brother or Sister (May 2007) OJJDP, Report, 69 pages, NCJ 217714.
Written by siblings of children who have been abducted, this guide contains information to help and support children of all ages when their brother or sister is kidnapped. The guide provides ideas on what children can expect in terms of the feelings they may experience, the events that may occur from day to day, and the things they can do to help themselves feel better. Written in child-friendly language, it is divided into such sections as: home, family, law enforcement, the media, school and work, and holidays and anniversaries. In addition, the guide contains activity pages for children of all ages, including those who are too young to read.
Abstract | PDF 6.45 MB | HTML (By Chapter)
 

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Grief is an individual’s natural reaction to the loss of someone or something that holds significant meaning. Grief is not a single emotion, but rather a wide range of intense emotions accompanied by physical and behavioral reactions.

Grieving is a personal experience that is often physically and emotionally draining. When a loss is sudden or violent, it may invoke traumatic reactions, such as intense fear, numbness, helplessness, or horror.

Grief and bereavement, which describes the period of grieving, can often become more complicated after a traumatic incident, such as a homicide. These situations may prolong the intensity and duration of emotional reactions. It’s important to recognize the amount of support a grieving person receives from their family, friends, and community is critical to how successfully they will cope with grief.

The following organizations, publications, and related resources provide additional information on grief and bereavement.


Grief is an individual’s natural reaction to the loss of someone or something that holds significant meaning. Grief is not a single emotion, but rather a wide range of intense emotions accompanied by physical and behavioral reactions.

Grieving is a personal experience that is often physically and emotionally draining. When a loss is sudden or violent, it may invoke traumatic reactions, such as intense fear, numbness, helplessness, or horror.

Grief and bereavement, which describes the period of grieving, can often become more complicated after a traumatic incident, such as a homicide. These situations may prolong the intensity and duration of emotional reactions. It’s important to recognize the amount of support a grieving person receives from their family, friends, and community is critical to how successfully they will cope with grief.

The following organizations, publications, and related resources provide additional information on grief and bereavement.


Each month the Nation's experts answer your questions about best practices in victim services. Below are upcoming and most recent session discussions in this topic:

On Sep 27 2016 at 2:00PM, Krista Flannigan, J.D., Director, Institute for Crime Victim Research & Policy at Florida State University, and Karen Thomas, President of the Connections Training Group, LLC, hosted a discussion on Serving Victims of Mass Violence

On May 19 2010 at 2:00PM, Debra Culberson, advisor to NamUs, and Duane Bowers, author of "Guiding Your Family Through Loss and Grief and A Child Is Missing: Providing Support for Families of Missing Children", hosted a discussion on Assisting Families of Missing or Unidentified Persons

On Nov 5 2008 at 2:00PM, Dan Levey, President of the National Organization of Parents of Murdered Children, Inc, and Debra Puglisi Sharp, member of the Board of Directors of the National Coalition of Victims in Action, hosted a discussion on Empowering Victims to Triumph Over Tragedy

On Aug 28 2008 at 2:00PM, Bill Jenkins, author of "What To Do When the Police Leave: A Guide to the First Days of Traumatic Loss", and Janice Harris Lord, author of "I’ll Never Forget Those Words: A Practical Guide to Death Notification", hosted a discussion on Delivering Victim-Sensitive Death Notifications

On Mar 14 2007 at 2:00PM, Ms. Barbara Rubel, Executive Director of the Griefwork Center, Inc. and bereavement specialist, hosted a discussion on Best Practices for Coping With Vicarious Trauma

Grief is an individual’s natural reaction to the loss of someone or something that holds significant meaning. Grief is not a single emotion, but rather a wide range of intense emotions accompanied by physical and behavioral reactions.

Grieving is a personal experience that is often physically and emotionally draining. When a loss is sudden or violent, it may invoke traumatic reactions, such as intense fear, numbness, helplessness, or horror.

Grief and bereavement, which describes the period of grieving, can often become more complicated after a traumatic incident, such as a homicide. These situations may prolong the intensity and duration of emotional reactions. It’s important to recognize the amount of support a grieving person receives from their family, friends, and community is critical to how successfully they will cope with grief.

The following organizations, publications, and related resources provide additional information on grief and bereavement.


How can I order OVC publications and products?
Many OVC publications and products are available in hardcopy and can be ordered from the National Cr... Read More

Are there support groups for the families of homicide victims?
Family members of homicide victims can find support groups in their area by contacting Parents of Mu... Read More

More FAQs

Grief is an individual’s natural reaction to the loss of someone or something that holds significant meaning. Grief is not a single emotion, but rather a wide range of intense emotions accompanied by physical and behavioral reactions.

Grieving is a personal experience that is often physically and emotionally draining. When a loss is sudden or violent, it may invoke traumatic reactions, such as intense fear, numbness, helplessness, or horror.

Grief and bereavement, which describes the period of grieving, can often become more complicated after a traumatic incident, such as a homicide. These situations may prolong the intensity and duration of emotional reactions. It’s important to recognize the amount of support a grieving person receives from their family, friends, and community is critical to how successfully they will cope with grief.

The following organizations, publications, and related resources provide additional information on grief and bereavement.


No funding records found relevant to this topic.

More Funding Opportunities

Grief is an individual’s natural reaction to the loss of someone or something that holds significant meaning. Grief is not a single emotion, but rather a wide range of intense emotions accompanied by physical and behavioral reactions.

Grieving is a personal experience that is often physically and emotionally draining. When a loss is sudden or violent, it may invoke traumatic reactions, such as intense fear, numbness, helplessness, or horror.

Grief and bereavement, which describes the period of grieving, can often become more complicated after a traumatic incident, such as a homicide. These situations may prolong the intensity and duration of emotional reactions. It’s important to recognize the amount of support a grieving person receives from their family, friends, and community is critical to how successfully they will cope with grief.

The following organizations, publications, and related resources provide additional information on grief and bereavement.


Publications

OVC and OVC-Sponsored Publications

2018 National Crime Victims' Rights Week (NCVRW) Resource Guide (2018) OVC, 3 pages, NCJ 251052. The 2018 NCVRW Resource Guide provides a wealth of materials for promoting public awareness campaigns for NCVRW and throughout the year. The guide includes planning tips, artwork, crime and victimization fact sheets, and more. Help OVC Expand the Circle: Reach All Victims.
Abstract | HTML
 
Victim Impact: Listen and Learn Curriculum (2016) OVC, 312 pages, NCJ 224257. This OVC-funded curriculum is geared toward helping offenders to become aware of the impact that crime has on victims and then to take responsibility and make amends for their actions. The online-only curriculum consists of 13 units, built around 10 core crime topics: property crime, assault, robbery, hate and bias, gang violence, sexual assault, child abuse and neglect, domestic violence, drunk and impaired driving, and homicide, plus chapters on implementing the program, the victim experience and making amends to victims. Victims and survivors speak about their experiences in the accompanying video clips.
Abstract | PDF (Facilitator Manual, Part 1) | PDF (Facilitator Manual, Part 2) | PDF (Participant Workbook) | HTML
 
Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services Final Report (May 2013) OVC, Report, 60 pages, NCJ 239957. The Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services initiative was launched by OVC in fall 2010 to expand the vision and impact of the crime victim assistance field. This Final Report provides a set of findings and broad recommendations, informed by stakeholder forums and literature reviews, that form a framework for strategic, transformative change. The Final Report outlines ways the field can overcome the obstacles it faces and change how it meets victims' needs and addresses those who perpetrate crime.
Abstract | PDF (Full Report) | PDF (Summary & Recommendations) | PDF (At a Glance Fact Sheet)
 
Serving Survivors of Homicide Victims During Cold Case Investigations: A Guide for Developing a Law Enforcement Protocol (August 2011) OVC-Sponsored, Grant, 55 pages, NCJ 236082. Through funding from OVC, the National Sheriffs' Association, Justice Solutions, and the National Organization of Parents Of Murdered Children, Inc., developed this publication which identifies and discusses how law enforcement agencies can develop protocols for best serving survivors of homicide during cold case investigations.
Abstract | PDF
 
What You Can Do if You Are a Victim of Crime (2010) OVC, Fact Sheet, OVC Fact Sheets, BC000790. This OVC brochure explains the rights of victims of crime and the compensation and assistance resources available to them. It also lists national organizations that help victims find information or obtain referrals.
PDF | HTML
Part Of the OVC Fact Sheets Series
 

OJP Publications

What About Me? Coping With the Abduction of a Brother or Sister (May 2007) OJJDP, Report, 69 pages, NCJ 217714. Written by siblings of children who have been abducted, this guide contains information to help and support children of all ages when their brother or sister is kidnapped. The guide provides ideas on what children can expect in terms of the feelings they may experience, the events that may occur from day to day, and the things they can do to help themselves feel better. Written in child-friendly language, it is divided into such sections as: home, family, law enforcement, the media, school and work, and holidays and anniversaries. In addition, the guide contains activity pages for children of all ages, including those who are too young to read.
Abstract | PDF 6.45 MB | HTML (By Chapter)
 

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Related Resources

Federal Resources

National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP)
NREPP is a searchable online registry of more than hundreds of interventions supporting mental health promotion, substance abuse prevention, and mental health and substance abuse treatment.
 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA): Disaster Distress Helpline
The Disaster Distress Helpline is dedicated to providing year-round disaster crisis counseling. This toll free, multilingual, crisis support service is available 24/7 via telephone 800–985–5990 (for Spanish, press 2) and SMS (text 'TalkWithUs', or for Spanish, text 'Hablanos', to 66746) to residents in the U.S. and its territories who are experiencing emotional distress related to natural or man-made disasters.
 

Non-Governmental Resources

Compassionate Friends
This nonprofit, self-help support organization offers friendship and understanding to bereaved parents, grandparents, and siblings. TCF provides an opportunity for sharing with and learning from other grievers.
 
Dougy Center for Grieving Children and Families
The Dougy Center for Grieving Children and Families provides support and training locally, nationally, and internationally to individuals and organizations seeking to assist children in grief.
 
National Organization of Parents of Murdered Children, Inc. (POMC)
POMC provides the ongoing emotional support needed to help parents and other survivors facilitate the reconstruction of a "new life" and to promote healthy grief resolution.
 

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Web Forum Discussions

Each month the Nation's experts answer your questions about best practices in victim services. Below are upcoming and most recent session discussions in this topic:

On Sep 27 2016 at 2:00PM, Krista Flannigan, J.D., Director, Institute for Crime Victim Research & Policy at Florida State University, and Karen Thomas, President of the Connections Training Group, LLC, hosted a discussion on Serving Victims of Mass Violence

On May 19 2010 at 2:00PM, Debra Culberson, advisor to NamUs, and Duane Bowers, author of "Guiding Your Family Through Loss and Grief and A Child Is Missing: Providing Support for Families of Missing Children", hosted a discussion on Assisting Families of Missing or Unidentified Persons

On Nov 5 2008 at 2:00PM, Dan Levey, President of the National Organization of Parents of Murdered Children, Inc, and Debra Puglisi Sharp, member of the Board of Directors of the National Coalition of Victims in Action, hosted a discussion on Empowering Victims to Triumph Over Tragedy

On Aug 28 2008 at 2:00PM, Bill Jenkins, author of "What To Do When the Police Leave: A Guide to the First Days of Traumatic Loss", and Janice Harris Lord, author of "I’ll Never Forget Those Words: A Practical Guide to Death Notification", hosted a discussion on Delivering Victim-Sensitive Death Notifications

On Mar 14 2007 at 2:00PM, Ms. Barbara Rubel, Executive Director of the Griefwork Center, Inc. and bereavement specialist, hosted a discussion on Best Practices for Coping With Vicarious Trauma


FAQs

How can I order OVC publications and products?
Many OVC publications and products are available in hardcopy and can be ordered from the National Cr... Read More

Are there support groups for the families of homicide victims?
Family members of homicide victims can find support groups in their area by contacting Parents of Mu... Read More

Back to Top


Funding

No funding records found relevant to this topic.

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EventsDirectoryE-Mail Updates
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National Calendar of Crime Victim Assistance-Related Events
Upcoming Event(s)
2018 VOCA National Training Conference
Savannah, GA
08/07/2018-08/09/2018

30th Annual Crimes Against Children Conference
Dallas, TX
08/13/2018-08/16/2018

National Indian Nations Conference: Justice for Victims of Crime
Agua Caliente Reservation, CA
12/05/2018-12/07/2018

Online Directory of Crime Victims Services.