OVC Provider Forum Transcript

Model Standards for Serving Victims and Survivors of Crime
Dana DeHart, Angie McCown  -  2016/10/19
https://ovc.ncjrs.gov/ovcproviderforum
 
 
What is the recommended protocol for notifying individuals that have contacted our organization their personal data may have been hacked?
 
1.  Angie McCown
 The e-publication for the Standards organizes each set into categories so each standard includes a section on "privacy, confidentiality, data security and assistive technology".
 
2.  Angie McCown
 The Program Standards of the Model Standards offers guidance on how to adopt policies, and might be useful in writing a policy regarding this topic.
 
3.  Dana DeHart
 Section 4 of the Model Standards program standards address data security, and standard 4.3 specifically addresses data breaches. The standard states that those whose data was breached should be notified and provided information about protective action. Ideally, agencies will put proactive policies in place to address data breaches and other aspects of data security.
 
4.  Angie McCown
 That is a question best answered by the legal representation for your agency. There is also very good information regarding identity theft on OVC and OVCTTAC websites, to include an online training course.
 
 
I am looking for updated guidelines on staff use of social media and other personal discussions outside of work. Can you recommend anything?
 
1.  Dana DeHart
 Here is a link to a NNEDV resource on social media: http://nnedv.org/resources/safetynetdocs/social-networking-a-privacy.html
 
2.  Dana DeHart
 I believe that the National Network to End Domestic Violence has some excellent resources on social media.
 
 
Are there any other similar resources which provide standards of conduct for service providers?
 
1.  Angie McCown
 Also some state victim service associations offer standards and/or ethical codes. I know the Texas Victim Services Association has one and I believe the Colorado Organization of Victim Assistance has one as well.
 
2.  Angie McCown
 Some of the national organizations such as MADD offers standards for their agencies. Most licensed clinicians have standards and/or ethical codes that rule their practice.
 
3.  Dana DeHart
 Yes, there are many resources for service providers in related fields, as well as some older standards from states and organizations serving victims of crime. Many of these were consulted in development of the newer Model Standards. The older version of these standards contained a directory of related standards; although that version will be dated, you can find a listing of similar standards around p.110 at this link: http://ccfs.sc.edu/images/pdfs/victimstandards.pdf
 
 
Our office is looking for some guidance on serving the LGBTQ community. Can you direct us any resources that could help us build our cultural competence in this area?
 
1.  Angie McCown
 OVC has some new training offerings on providing services to the LGBTQ community. You can find them on the OVC website.
 
2.  Dana DeHart
 I should also note that OVC TTAC is a great resource, so you may want to approach TTAC about existing training and materials, as well as about the possibility of delivering a specialized training to providers in your geographic area.
 
3.  Dana DeHart
 The Anti-Violence Project has some resources on this topic: http://www.avp.org/storage/documents/TrainingຈandຈTAຈCenter/GAGV_Working_with_LGBT_Victims_Handout.pdf
 
 
do you have any advice on how we should evaluate survivors who want to volunteer? i am looking to ensure improve our processes to ensure we minimize the chances of bringing people on board that may not be ready.
 
1.  Angie McCown
 Scenario questions are often useful in screening volunteers to determine what might trigger their own history, as well as discussions and training around boundaries and how to respond when something personal is triggered.
 
2.  Dana DeHart
 I think the competency standards on the Model Standards website are a nice starting point for thinking about dimensions of readiness for individual providers. One might consider assessing competency on each dimension, just as one would do for competencies used with field interns, etc. One important point is that the consortium members who developed the standards felt strongly that competency may be attained in a variety of ways, including formal training, education, personal experience, on-the-job training, etc. Thus, you may want to consider a mixture of these when considering ways to bring people up to a specified benchmark of competency.
 
3.  Angie McCown
 There is a Resiliency in Child Abuse Training on the OVC and OVCTTAC website that offers a module on hiring of volunteers. It includes a short video on hiring volunteers as well, that addresses how to screen for volunteers who have come to a place in their own victimization history that would allow them to perform well as a volunteer.
 
 
As the executive director of a newly established child advocacy center, I am struggling with ensuring the needs of victims are being met by all components of the multidisciplinary team. Since the CAC is providing victim services, it would be my thought that the CAC would need to comply with the Model Set of Standards as provided by OVC, yet these standards are not provided/encouraged to the CACs. Any suggestions or thoughts?
 
1.  Angie McCown
 These Standards were released by OVC just recently with the intent of offering guidance to organizations rather than mandating their use. I would recommend reaching out to the National CAC office to request that they encourage all CACs to review the Standards and consider their application. You may also request TTA for OVC TTAC if you would like assistance implementing the Standards.
 
2.  Dana DeHart
 The intent and structure of the model standards is to encourage thoughtful consideration of policies and procedures that are or are not in place. The consortium that developed the standards felt strongly that standards could be adapted to suit needs of particular user groups. It may be that the CACs could support portions of the standards or adapted components of these standards.
 
 
Ideas on how to contact victims who move a lot
 
1.  Angie McCown
 I might recommend using interns or volunteers to search databases and reach out to other criminal justice professionals who may have current information regarding victim contact information. There are services you can purchase as well, that will perform these searches for you.
 
2.  Dana DeHart
 I am not a practitioner so have less experience with this. However, some of the research literature on tracking participants may be helpful in this respect, such as the following study: Staying connected with youth transitioning out of foster care (Mitchell & Vann) Article in Journal of Social Work June 2016 DOI: 10.1177/1468017316654342
 
 
The Model Standards are an excellent tool for updating agency policies and procedures. State Victim Assistance Academies might consider offering an overview of the Standards in their academy or offering an advanced academy on operationalizing the Standards.
 
1.  Dana DeHart
 Yes, that is a great idea. The standards Website provides media clips that may be helpful in introducing the standards to victim service providers.
 
 
I am curious if any of the model standards have been formally added to victim academy training curriculums or if there are any resources that may assist with incorporating the model standards into other training opportunities.
 
1.  Angie McCown
 You might consider requesting TTA from OVCTTAC to help create curriculum on the Standards for your State Academy.
 
2.  Dana DeHart
 I believe that the National Victim Assistance Academy may include some information on the standards, and some state academies have also included material on the standards in the past. We have worked through OVC TTAC with states in the past to help integrate standards into academy trainings. Also, as mentioned in a prior post, the media that accompanies the online standards provides a nice overview of the standards.
 
3.  Angie McCown
 Texas has begun to incorporate the Standards into the Academy curriculum and is considering offering an online training regarding the implementation of these standards.
 
 
Are there any services that you are aware of that offer support to individuals who were found to be victims of a false allegation? It is not uncommon for those individuals to also experience PTSD or other mental trauma that is traditionally only associated with victims of crime.
 
1.  Angie McCown
 I would encourage you to reach out to the victim services agencies in your area to see if they offer crisis intervention or therapy to these individuals. Another avenue would be to reach out to therapists in your area who work with trauma to see if they might offer a sliding scale fee for those individuals who may not have insurance.
 
2.  Dana DeHart
 I am unaware of specific resources for service provision to these individuals, but advocacy groups may be able to direct you to resources (specific advocacy group would depend on the nature of the allegations, etc.). Further, general mental health services might address this needs.
 
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