OVC Provider Forum Transcript

Build Your Own Body of Evidence-Based Knowledge
Cris Sullivan, Keri Darling  -  2015/5/5
https://ovc.ncjrs.gov/ovcproviderforum
 
 
This question is for Keri. Can you provide some infromation on how our organization can overcome communication barriers when working with victims who are deaf?
 
1.  Keri Darling
 another possible resource, I participated in providing information for this document. http://www.vera.org/pubs/special/serving-deaf-survivors-domestic-sexual-violence
 
2.  Keri Darling
 I would suggest to have a deaf professional come and provide a training on deaf culture and communication, there are so many things to learn like different kinds of hearing loss, how to communicate without interpreter there, or how to find and use interpreters etc... I happen to have a list of all Deaf DV programs in the US I could send you more information
 
3.  Keri Darling
 Certainly! There are a lot of communication barriers so I'm not sure what exactly you are talking about. One way is to partner with deaf advocates in your area they can guide you and another is to know who the interpreters are in your area, especially interpreters who have been trained in DV/SV
 
 
Is there a good "how-to" guide available that provides step by step instruction on conducting a program evaluation?
 
1.  Cris Sullivan
 We are in the process of putting tools, surveys, handouts, and other concrete help up on www.dvevidenceproject.org but unfortunately that page is currently under construction. We're hoping VERY SOON though! So keep checking back
 
2.  Keri Darling
 Another good resource is under http://www.dvevidenceproject.org
 
3.  Keri Darling
 hello, I know Vera Institute has wonderful resources maybe check this out? http://www.vera.org/project/cultivating-evaluation-capacity-sexual-domestic-violence-guide
 
4.  Cris Sullivan
 Thanks for your question; I have put a free manuals on my website for you: vaw.msu.edu/toolkits Please feel free to use whatever is helpful!
 
 
How can we effectively use social media to conduct outreach?
 
1.  Cris Sullivan
 That's not my area but I would refer you to: http://www.ncdsv.org/images/NRCDV_UtilSocialMediaEgageComm_9-09.pdf
 
2.  Keri Darling
 For the deaf community, social media is a great resource if done the right way... this means putting everything you want them to know in American Sign Language in VLOGS... this makes all the information you generally present in english format accessible to deaf people. On Facebook (FB) there are a lot of different places you can search with the word Deaf in it and post on their pages
 
 
What can be done to better communicate new research to the field, especially for those who may have trouble understanding research studies?
 
1.  Cris Sullivan
 MINCAVA is another clearinghouse of information: www.mincava.umn.edu All of these resources try to get research out to the field in digestible ways!
 
2.  Cris Sullivan
 National Resource Center on Domestic Violence also created an online resource to distribute current evidence about programs and services: www.dvevidenceproject.org
 
3.  Cris Sullivan
 This is an ongoing problem. The National Resource Center on Domestic Violence has been addressing that in a few ways. VAWnet Applied Research summarizes hot topics: www.vawnet.org (more in next post)
 
 
Our organization has limited staffing and funding. What suggestions do you have for integrating Evidence-Based Knowledge into our day to day operations?
 
1.  Cris Sullivan
 And when you want to use NEW practices, we have also tried to address that by providing surveys and administration tips for staff. We know MOST programs are doing all of this with no additional funding or time.
 
2.  Cris Sullivan
 That's a very common problem and why we created www.dvevidencproject.org The truth is many of you already ARE doing evidence-based practice, we just aren't selling that to funders. We have a Theory of Change for you (free) at the site that you can use to explain to funders that you are using evidence based practices http://www.dvevidenceproject.org/wp-content/uploads/ConceptualFramework.pdf
 
 
Are you aware of any studies that have shown results in reaching young male victims of crime in urban areas? I'll look through some of the links you provided earlier in the discussion
 
1.  Cris Sullivan
 Sorry, that's not my area
 
 
can you give us a general overview of some of the things you look for when evaluating a domestic violence/sexual assault program?
 
1.  Cris Sullivan
 This conceptual model explains why "well-being outcomes" are important for DV and SA programs to measure. http://www.dvevidenceproject.org/wp-content/uploads/ConceptualFramework.pdf
 
2.  Cris Sullivan
 Some outcomes that many programs I've worked with find important is that survivors will experience: more hopefulness, less isolation, more knowledge about their options, more safety strategies, higher quality of life, feeling more connected to others. Do these fit for you, or would you choose others?
 
3.  Keri Darling
 From my perspective deaf related, I want to be looking for communication policies, how are victims assessing information, is ADA being followed, I want to know if the program is up to date on technology and other TA needs for Deaf victims and if there is partnering happening with local deaf advocates
 
4.  Cris Sullivan
 The hardest part about evaluating our programs is that each survivor wants something different and is coming with different strengths and experiences. We are not about ending violence since we work with victims and they are not responsible for the violence. So I focus on increasing well-being and sense of power. We do that WELL. I think it's important to hear from clients themselves, not staff, about whether they have achieved outcomes important to them.
 
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