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Homicide Survivors/Co-victims

  • Publications (24)
  • Resources (18)
  • Forum Discussions (4)
  • FAQs (7)
  • Funding (1)
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A homicide survivor or co-victim is anyone (such as a spouse or partner, child, sibling, extended family member, or friend) who has been impacted by the death of a loved one by homicide. The trauma and grief they experience can cause emotional scars that last a lifetime. They may also experience other kinds of loss, such as a loss of income in the family or the loss of a sense of safety and security. Homicide survivors and co-victims are an underserved and sparsely researched population of crime victims with unique and distinct problems. They need specialized resources in the aftermath of the homicide to lessen its long-term psychological impact, and to help them cope with their grief while restoring control in their lives.

The following resources provide guidance on communicating with and responding to homicide survivors and co-victims.


OVC and OVC-Sponsored Publications

2018 National Crime Victims' Rights Week (NCVRW) Resource Guide (2018) OVC, 3 pages, NCJ 251052.
The 2018 NCVRW Resource Guide provides a wealth of materials for promoting public awareness campaigns for NCVRW and throughout the year. The guide includes planning tips, artwork, crime and victimization fact sheets, and more. Help OVC Expand the Circle: Reach All Victims.
Abstract | HTML
 
2018 Homicide Statistical Fact Sheet (2018) OVC
This fact sheet provides a snapshot of current homicide trends in the United States. Use this and other fact sheets from the 2018 National Crime Victims’ Rights Week Resource Guide (www.ovc.gov/ncvrw2018) to promote awareness about different types of crime, as graphics for your social media, and to inform other education efforts throughout the year.
PDF
 
2018 Mass Casualty Shootings Statistical Fact Sheet (2018) OVC
This fact sheet provides a snapshot of current trends in mass casualty shootings in the United States. Use this and other fact sheets from the 2018 National Crime Victims’ Rights Week Resource Guide (www.ovc.gov/ncvrw2018) to promote awareness about different types of crime, as graphics for your social media, and to inform other education efforts throughout the year.
PDF
 
Vision 21: Multidisciplinary Responses in Complex Homicide Cases (August 2017) OVC, Fact Sheet, 2 pages, NCJ 250945.
This fact sheet describes an OVC-funded project to support the enhancement of multidisciplinary interventions within 24 to 48 hours of a death for some of the most complex cases. These cases may include gang-related homicides, intrafamilial homicides, homicides involving child witnesses, and deaths involving impaired driving or driving under the influence.
Abstract | PDF
 
Vision 21: Law Enforcement and the Communities They Serve (June 2017) OVC, Fact Sheet, OVC Fact Sheets, 2 pages, NCJ 250737.
This fact sheet discusses an OVC-sponsored project that is designed to assist law enforcement in developing evidence-based and trauma-informed response strategies in the wake of law enforcement-involved shootings and other high-profile incidents of violence. Additionally, the project will develop and disseminate comprehensive, expert technical assistance resources for law enforcement on trauma-informed culture and practice.
Abstract | PDF
Part Of the OVC Fact Sheets Series
 

OJP Publications

Nation's Two Measures of Homicide (July 2014) BJS, Report, 4 pages, NCJ 247060.
This report summarizes the United States' two national data collection systems related to homicide: the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Supplementary Homicide Reports and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Fatal Injury Reports. This report describes the strengths, limitations, differences, and complementary aspects of each program.
Abstract | PDF | TEXT
 
Homicide in the U.S. Known to Law Enforcement, 2011 (December 2013) BJS, Report, 18 pages, NCJ 243035.
This report presents data on homicide trends from 1992 to 2011. The report describes homicide patterns and trends by age, sex, and race of the victim. It explores weapon use, with a focus on trends in firearm use and homicide trends by city size.
Abstract | PDF | TEXT
 
Firearm Violence, 1993-2011 (May 2013) BJS, Report, BJS Special Reports, 28 pages, NCJ 241730.
This report presents trends on the number and rate of fatal and nonfatal firearm violence from 1993 to 2011. The report examines incident and victim demographic characteristics of firearm violence, including the type of firearm used; victim's race, age, and sex; and incident location. The report also examines changes over time in the percentages of nonfatal firearm crimes by injury, reporting to the police, and the use of firearms in self-defense.

Part Of the BJS Special Reports Series Abstract | PDF | TEXT
 
Workplace Violence Against Government Employees, 1994-2011 (April 2013) BJS, Report, BJS Special Reports, 19 pages, NCJ 241349.
This report presents information on both nonfatal and fatal forms of violence in the workplace against government employees, based on the Bureau of Justice Statistics' National Crime Victimization Survey and the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries.

Part Of the BJS Special Reports Series Abstract | PDF | TEXT
 
Violent Victimization Committed by Strangers, 1993-2010 (December 2012) BJS, Report, BJS Special Reports, 19 pages, NCJ 239424.
This report presents findings on the rates and levels of violent victimization committed by offenders who were strangers to the victims, including homicide, rape, sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, and simple assault.

Part Of the BJS Special Reports Series Abstract | PDF | TEXT
 

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A homicide survivor or co-victim is anyone (such as a spouse or partner, child, sibling, extended family member, or friend) who has been impacted by the death of a loved one by homicide. The trauma and grief they experience can cause emotional scars that last a lifetime. They may also experience other kinds of loss, such as a loss of income in the family or the loss of a sense of safety and security. Homicide survivors and co-victims are an underserved and sparsely researched population of crime victims with unique and distinct problems. They need specialized resources in the aftermath of the homicide to lessen its long-term psychological impact, and to help them cope with their grief while restoring control in their lives.

The following resources provide guidance on communicating with and responding to homicide survivors and co-victims.


A homicide survivor or co-victim is anyone (such as a spouse or partner, child, sibling, extended family member, or friend) who has been impacted by the death of a loved one by homicide. The trauma and grief they experience can cause emotional scars that last a lifetime. They may also experience other kinds of loss, such as a loss of income in the family or the loss of a sense of safety and security. Homicide survivors and co-victims are an underserved and sparsely researched population of crime victims with unique and distinct problems. They need specialized resources in the aftermath of the homicide to lessen its long-term psychological impact, and to help them cope with their grief while restoring control in their lives.

The following resources provide guidance on communicating with and responding to homicide survivors and co-victims.


Each month the Nation's experts answer your questions about best practices in victim services. Below are upcoming and most recent session discussions in this topic:

On Aug 18 2010 at 2:00PM, Diane Alexander, Senior Advisor of Justice Solutions, and Dan Levey, National President, The National Organization of Parents Of Murdered Children, Inc, and Tim Woods, Director of the Research, Development, and Grants Division at the National Sheriffs' Association, hosted a discussion on Serving Survivors of Homicide Victims During Cold Case Investigations

On Nov 8 2007 at 2:00PM, Carroll Ann Ellis, Director of the Victim Services Division of the Fairfax County Police Department, hosted a discussion on Working with Survivors of Homicide and Other Traumatic Events

On May 23 2007 at 2:00PM, Laurie Caldwell, Senior Agent with the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division, and Bob Lowery, City Manager and Team Adam member, hosted a discussion on Addressing Cases With Missing or Unidentified Victims

On Sep 7 2005 at 2:00PM, Nancy Ruhe, Executive Director of the National Organization of Parents Of Murdered Children, Inc, hosted a discussion on Assisting Parents of Murdered Children

A homicide survivor or co-victim is anyone (such as a spouse or partner, child, sibling, extended family member, or friend) who has been impacted by the death of a loved one by homicide. The trauma and grief they experience can cause emotional scars that last a lifetime. They may also experience other kinds of loss, such as a loss of income in the family or the loss of a sense of safety and security. Homicide survivors and co-victims are an underserved and sparsely researched population of crime victims with unique and distinct problems. They need specialized resources in the aftermath of the homicide to lessen its long-term psychological impact, and to help them cope with their grief while restoring control in their lives.

The following resources provide guidance on communicating with and responding to homicide survivors and co-victims.


How many people are murdered in the United States each year?
Statistics on homicide can be accessed via the Homicide Trends in the United States section of the B... Read More

How many homicide victims were killed with a handgun?
Statistics on homicides committed with a handgun are available in the Bureau of Justice Statistics (... Read More

I am a crime victim, how can I get help?
Help in your area is available from your State/Local Victim Compensation and Assistance programs. As... Read More

How can I order OVC publications and products?
Many OVC publications and products are available in hardcopy and can be ordered from the National Cr... Read More

How many homicide victims are murdered by an intimate partner each year?
Intimate partner homicide statistics are available from the Homicide Trends in the United States sec... Read More

More FAQs

A homicide survivor or co-victim is anyone (such as a spouse or partner, child, sibling, extended family member, or friend) who has been impacted by the death of a loved one by homicide. The trauma and grief they experience can cause emotional scars that last a lifetime. They may also experience other kinds of loss, such as a loss of income in the family or the loss of a sense of safety and security. Homicide survivors and co-victims are an underserved and sparsely researched population of crime victims with unique and distinct problems. They need specialized resources in the aftermath of the homicide to lessen its long-term psychological impact, and to help them cope with their grief while restoring control in their lives.

The following resources provide guidance on communicating with and responding to homicide survivors and co-victims.


FY 2018 Tribal Victim Services Set-Aside Program (PDF 489 kb)
Deadline: 08/06/2018
Under the solicitation, OVC will award eligible tribes, tribal consortia, and tribal designees grants to support a wide-range of services for victims of crime. OVC anticipates making up to $110 million available through this solicitation to support tribes to improve victim services. In developing the scope of activities allowable with this funding, OVC took into account input from tribal leaders and other stakeholders regarding needs for victim services in tribal communities. This solicitation has a streamlined, two-phase process by which tribes may apply for and receive the tribal set-aside funding. This solicitation has a streamlined, two-phase application process for this unique program. OVC will conduct a Phase 1 pre-application webinar on June 28, 2018, at 2:00 p.m. e.t. Register at www.ovc.gov/grants/webinars.html. Phase 1 applications are due by 9:00 p.m. e.t. on August 6, 2018.

More Funding Opportunities

A homicide survivor or co-victim is anyone (such as a spouse or partner, child, sibling, extended family member, or friend) who has been impacted by the death of a loved one by homicide. The trauma and grief they experience can cause emotional scars that last a lifetime. They may also experience other kinds of loss, such as a loss of income in the family or the loss of a sense of safety and security. Homicide survivors and co-victims are an underserved and sparsely researched population of crime victims with unique and distinct problems. They need specialized resources in the aftermath of the homicide to lessen its long-term psychological impact, and to help them cope with their grief while restoring control in their lives.

The following resources provide guidance on communicating with and responding to homicide survivors and co-victims.


Publications

OVC and OVC-Sponsored Publications

2018 National Crime Victims' Rights Week (NCVRW) Resource Guide (2018) OVC, 3 pages, NCJ 251052. The 2018 NCVRW Resource Guide provides a wealth of materials for promoting public awareness campaigns for NCVRW and throughout the year. The guide includes planning tips, artwork, crime and victimization fact sheets, and more. Help OVC Expand the Circle: Reach All Victims.
Abstract | HTML
 
2018 Homicide Statistical Fact Sheet (2018) OVC This fact sheet provides a snapshot of current homicide trends in the United States. Use this and other fact sheets from the 2018 National Crime Victims’ Rights Week Resource Guide (www.ovc.gov/ncvrw2018) to promote awareness about different types of crime, as graphics for your social media, and to inform other education efforts throughout the year.
PDF
 
2018 Mass Casualty Shootings Statistical Fact Sheet (2018) OVC This fact sheet provides a snapshot of current trends in mass casualty shootings in the United States. Use this and other fact sheets from the 2018 National Crime Victims’ Rights Week Resource Guide (www.ovc.gov/ncvrw2018) to promote awareness about different types of crime, as graphics for your social media, and to inform other education efforts throughout the year.
PDF
 
Vision 21: Multidisciplinary Responses in Complex Homicide Cases (August 2017) OVC, Fact Sheet, 2 pages, NCJ 250945. This fact sheet describes an OVC-funded project to support the enhancement of multidisciplinary interventions within 24 to 48 hours of a death for some of the most complex cases. These cases may include gang-related homicides, intrafamilial homicides, homicides involving child witnesses, and deaths involving impaired driving or driving under the influence.
Abstract | PDF
 
Vision 21: Law Enforcement and the Communities They Serve (June 2017) OVC, Fact Sheet, OVC Fact Sheets, 2 pages, NCJ 250737. This fact sheet discusses an OVC-sponsored project that is designed to assist law enforcement in developing evidence-based and trauma-informed response strategies in the wake of law enforcement-involved shootings and other high-profile incidents of violence. Additionally, the project will develop and disseminate comprehensive, expert technical assistance resources for law enforcement on trauma-informed culture and practice.
Abstract | PDF
Part Of the OVC Fact Sheets Series
 

OJP Publications

Nation's Two Measures of Homicide (July 2014) BJS, Report, 4 pages, NCJ 247060. This report summarizes the United States' two national data collection systems related to homicide: the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Supplementary Homicide Reports and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Fatal Injury Reports. This report describes the strengths, limitations, differences, and complementary aspects of each program.
Abstract | PDF | TEXT
 
Homicide in the U.S. Known to Law Enforcement, 2011 (December 2013) BJS, Report, 18 pages, NCJ 243035. This report presents data on homicide trends from 1992 to 2011. The report describes homicide patterns and trends by age, sex, and race of the victim. It explores weapon use, with a focus on trends in firearm use and homicide trends by city size.
Abstract | PDF | TEXT
 
Firearm Violence, 1993-2011 (May 2013) BJS, Report, BJS Special Reports, 28 pages, NCJ 241730. This report presents trends on the number and rate of fatal and nonfatal firearm violence from 1993 to 2011. The report examines incident and victim demographic characteristics of firearm violence, including the type of firearm used; victim's race, age, and sex; and incident location. The report also examines changes over time in the percentages of nonfatal firearm crimes by injury, reporting to the police, and the use of firearms in self-defense.
Part Of the BJS Special Reports Series
Abstract | PDF | TEXT
 
Workplace Violence Against Government Employees, 1994-2011 (April 2013) BJS, Report, BJS Special Reports, 19 pages, NCJ 241349. This report presents information on both nonfatal and fatal forms of violence in the workplace against government employees, based on the Bureau of Justice Statistics' National Crime Victimization Survey and the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries.
Part Of the BJS Special Reports Series
Abstract | PDF | TEXT
 
Violent Victimization Committed by Strangers, 1993-2010 (December 2012) BJS, Report, BJS Special Reports, 19 pages, NCJ 239424. This report presents findings on the rates and levels of violent victimization committed by offenders who were strangers to the victims, including homicide, rape, sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, and simple assault.
Part Of the BJS Special Reports Series
Abstract | PDF | TEXT
 

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Related Resources

OVC Funded Resources

VictimConnect Resource Center - Confidential referrals for crime victims
VictimConnect serves victims of any crime in the United States. Trained specialists are available to help you locate referrals for mental health counseling, financial compensation, legal services, civil justice options, support groups, crime reporting, identity theft recovery and more.
 

Federal Resources

Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS): Homicide Trends in the United States
This BJS tool provides data at the state-level related to homicides, including the number of victims, demographic data (age, race, and gender), and weapon involvement.
 
Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS): Victims
Summary findings, publications, selected statistics: Victim characteristics, BJS Criminal Victimization in the United States—annual detailed statistical tables, BJS Homicide Trends in the United States, and the National Crime Victimization Survey.
 
National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS)
Sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs, NCJRS offers information on victimology and victim assistance, criminal justice, juvenile justice, information to support research, policy, and program development worldwide. NCJRS supplies the victim services field with resources, publications, and program information. The NCJRS library collection includes more than 30,000 resources relevant to the field.
 
Office for Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP): Easy Access to the FBI's Supplementary Homicide Reports (EZASHR)
EZASHR provides access to more than twenty years of national and State data on homicide victims and known homicide offenders, including information on the age, sex, and race of victims and offenders, the victim-offender relationship, and the type of weapon used.
 

Non-Governmental Resources

Citizens Against Homicide (CAH)
CAH provides support and a voice for the survivors and friends of murder victims.
 
Concerns of Police Survivors (COPS)
COPS provides resources to help rebuild the lives of survivors of law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty.
 
Mothers Against Drunk Driving (MADD)
MADD has hundreds of chapters that assist victims of drunk driving crashes at the local level. Its Web site offers statistics, activism information, materials in Spanish, and program awareness resources. MADD recently launched a 24-hour hotline to lend support to victims of drunk driving and their friends and family. You can call 1-877-MADD-HELP for emotional support, guidance, and referrals.
 
National Organization of Parents of Murdered Children, Inc. (POMC)
POMC provides the ongoing emotional support needed to help parents and other survivors facilitate the reconstruction of a "new life" and to promote healthy grief resolution.
 
We Regret to Inform You ... (Death Notification Training)
The Federal Bureau of Investigation, in partnership with Penn State University, created this free web based training for law enforcement agencies and other first responders responsible for notifying the family members of those who have died suddenly as a result of a crime, an accident, a suicide, or other type of incident. The training is designed to enhance the professionalism, dignity, and compassion of those tasked with delivering death notifications, including: law enforcement, victim advocates, coroners, medical examiners, chaplains, hospital staff, and others.
 

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Web Forum Discussions

Each month the Nation's experts answer your questions about best practices in victim services. Below are upcoming and most recent session discussions in this topic:

On Aug 18 2010 at 2:00PM, Diane Alexander, Senior Advisor of Justice Solutions, and Dan Levey, National President, The National Organization of Parents Of Murdered Children, Inc, and Tim Woods, Director of the Research, Development, and Grants Division at the National Sheriffs' Association, hosted a discussion on Serving Survivors of Homicide Victims During Cold Case Investigations

On Nov 8 2007 at 2:00PM, Carroll Ann Ellis, Director of the Victim Services Division of the Fairfax County Police Department, hosted a discussion on Working with Survivors of Homicide and Other Traumatic Events

On May 23 2007 at 2:00PM, Laurie Caldwell, Senior Agent with the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division, and Bob Lowery, City Manager and Team Adam member, hosted a discussion on Addressing Cases With Missing or Unidentified Victims

On Sep 7 2005 at 2:00PM, Nancy Ruhe, Executive Director of the National Organization of Parents Of Murdered Children, Inc, hosted a discussion on Assisting Parents of Murdered Children


FAQs

How many people are murdered in the United States each year?
Statistics on homicide can be accessed via the Homicide Trends in the United States section of the B... Read More

How many homicide victims were killed with a handgun?
Statistics on homicides committed with a handgun are available in the Bureau of Justice Statistics (... Read More

I am a crime victim, how can I get help?
Help in your area is available from your State/Local Victim Compensation and Assistance programs. As... Read More

How can I order OVC publications and products?
Many OVC publications and products are available in hardcopy and can be ordered from the National Cr... Read More

How many homicide victims are murdered by an intimate partner each year?
Intimate partner homicide statistics are available from the Homicide Trends in the United States sec... Read More

Back to Top


Funding

FY 2018 Tribal Victim Services Set-Aside Program (PDF 489 kb)
Deadline: 08/06/2018
Under the solicitation, OVC will award eligible tribes, tribal consortia, and tribal designees grants to support a wide-range of services for victims of crime. OVC anticipates making up to $110 million available through this solicitation to support tribes to improve victim services. In developing the scope of activities allowable with this funding, OVC took into account input from tribal leaders and other stakeholders regarding needs for victim services in tribal communities. This solicitation has a streamlined, two-phase process by which tribes may apply for and receive the tribal set-aside funding. This solicitation has a streamlined, two-phase application process for this unique program. OVC will conduct a Phase 1 pre-application webinar on June 28, 2018, at 2:00 p.m. e.t. Register at www.ovc.gov/grants/webinars.html. Phase 1 applications are due by 9:00 p.m. e.t. on August 6, 2018.

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EventsDirectoryE-Mail Updates
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National Calendar of Crime Victim Assistance-Related Events
Upcoming Event(s)
2018 VOCA National Training Conference
Savannah, GA
08/07/2018-08/09/2018

30th Annual Crimes Against Children Conference
Dallas, TX
08/13/2018-08/16/2018

Online Directory of Crime Victims Services.