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Whenever a crime is committed, law enforcement officers are typically the first to arrive on the scene and to interact with victims. As a result, police officers have more contact with crime victims in the immediate aftermath of a crime than any other criminal justice professional. This makes their role critical and puts them in a unique position to meet victims’ needs immediately after the crime has occurred and encourage and facilitate the victim’s participation in the criminal justice system. An officer’s initial response to a victim will have a long-lasting impact on that individual’s experience of the justice system and his or her participation in the investigation and prosecution of the crime.

 

Each year, the week of May 15th is recognized as National Police Week in honor of the law enforcement personnel who provide the first crucial services to crime victims and in celebration of their brave efforts to keep us all safe.

 

The following resources are provided for law enforcement professionals.


OVC and OVC-Sponsored Publications

Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services Final Report (May 2013) OVC, Report, 63 pages, NCJ 239957.
The Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services initiative was launched by OVC in fall 2010 to expand the vision and impact of the crime victim assistance field. This Final Report provides a set of findings and broad recommendations, informed by stakeholder forums and literature reviews, that form a framework for strategic, transformative change. The Final Report outlines ways the field can overcome the obstacles it faces and change how it meets victims' needs and addresses those who perpetrate crime.
Abstract | PDF (Full Report) | PDF (Summary & Recommendations) | PDF (At a Glance Fact Sheet)
 
Office for Victims of Crime Training and Technical Assistance Center Fact Sheet (January 2013) OVC, Fact Sheet, OVC Fact Sheets, FS000394.
This Fact Sheet describes the services and trainings available through the OVC Training and Technical Assistance Center (OVC TTAC) and how these resources can be accessed.
PDF
Part Of the OVC Fact Sheets Series
 
Directory of Training and Technical Assistance Resources for Anti-Human Trafficking Task Forces and Service Providers (December 2012) OVC, 26 pages, NCJ 240597.
OVC and BJA have launched a Directory of Training and Technical Assistance Resources for Anti-Human Trafficking Task Forces and Service Providers. The directory includes "distance learning," "in-person training" and "training by request" opportunities. It is an excellent resource for practitioners and task forces actively working in the field to expand and enhance their knowledge.
Abstract | PDF | HTML
 
Promoting Effective Criminal Investigations of Campus Sex Crimes, Summary Report (November 2012) OVC, 53 pages, NCJ 240177.
OVC, the Office on Violence Against Women, and the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services partnered with the International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators and the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights to conduct a forum that addressed the topic of enhancing criminal investigations of campus sex crimes. This report summarizes the discussion at the forum and provides a list of resources for those working to investigate sex crimes.
Abstract | PDF
 
Attorney General Guidelines for Victim and Witness Assistance 2011 Edition (Revised May 2012) (May 2012) OVC, 66 pages, NCJ 235121.
These guidelines establish policy and provide guidance to be followed by U.S. Department of Justice personnel in their interactions with crime victims and witnesses. Effective October 1, 2011, these guidelines clarified DOJ's responsibilities to provide mandated rights and services enumerated in the Crime Victims’ Rights Act (CVRA) and the Victims' Rights and Restitution Act (VRRA) as well as other statutory requirements. Furthermore, the guidelines examine the unique requirements of vulnerable victims, including a recent update in May 2012 that addresses the scope of the federal child abuse reporting requirement under section 13031 of the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990, 42 U.S.C. § 13031.
Abstract | PDF
 

OJP Publications

Household Burglary, 1994-2011 (June 2013) BJS, Report, BJS Special Reports, 18 pages, NCJ 241754.
This report presents rates and trends in household burglary from 1993 to 2011. The report explores overall trends in household burglary and examines patterns in completed household burglary by type and value of items stolen, percentage of burglaries reported to the police and insurance companies, and police response.

Part Of the BJS Special Reports Series Abstract | PDF | HTML
 
Firearm Violence, 1993-2011 (May 2013) BJS, Report, BJS Special Reports, 28 pages, NCJ 241730.
This report presents trends on the number and rate of fatal and nonfatal firearm violence from 1993 to 2011. The report examines incident and victim demographic characteristics of firearm violence, including the type of firearm used; victim's race, age, and sex; and incident location. The report also examines changes over time in the percentages of nonfatal firearm crimes by injury, reporting to the police, and the use of firearms in self-defense.

Part Of the BJS Special Reports Series Abstract | PDF | TEXT
 
Untested Evidence in Sexual Assault Cases (February 2013) NIJ-Sponsored, 6 pages, NCJ 241356.
In this article from the Sexual Assault Report™, NIJ staff member Nancy Ritter explores: whether every sexual assault kit (SAK) should be tested every kit - even ones that are 25 years old; should priority be given to certain kits, and if so, how do we decide; and how to handle cases in which the alleged perpetrator is already known. The article also explains where the weak spots are in collecting, storing, and testing kits; why the police might not send sexual assault kits to be tested; and what early evidence is showing about complex issues such as victim notification.
Abstract | PDF
 
Directory of Training and Technical Assistance Resources for Anti-Human Trafficking Task Forces and Service Providers (December 2012) BJA, 26 pages, NCJ 240597.
OVC and BJA have launched a Directory of Training and Technical Assistance Resources for Anti-Human Trafficking Task Forces and Service Providers. The directory includes "distance learning," "in-person training" and "training by request" opportunities. It is an excellent resource for practitioners and task forces actively working in the field to expand and enhance their knowledge.
Abstract | PDF | HTML
 
Victimizations Not Reported to the Police, 2006-2010 (August 2012) BJS, Report, BJS Special Reports, 18 pages, NCJ 238536.
This report presents findings, for a five-year period from 2006 to 2010, on the characteristics of crime victimizations that went unreported to police, according to data from the National Crime Victimization Survey. The characteristics examined in this report include the type of crime, whether it involved a weapon or injury, the victim-offender relationship, and demographic characteristics of the victim. For each of the characteristics examined, the report also details victims' rationale for not reporting to the police, including beliefs that the police would not or could not help, that the crime was not important enough to report, or fear of reprisal or getting the offender into trouble. The report also examines trends from 1994 to 2010 in the types of crime not reported to the police and the reasons victimizations went unreported.

Part Of the BJS Special Reports Series Abstract | PDF | TEXT
 

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Whenever a crime is committed, law enforcement officers are typically the first to arrive on the scene and to interact with victims. As a result, police officers have more contact with crime victims in the immediate aftermath of a crime than any other criminal justice professional. This makes their role critical and puts them in a unique position to meet victims’ needs immediately after the crime has occurred and encourage and facilitate the victim’s participation in the criminal justice system. An officer’s initial response to a victim will have a long-lasting impact on that individual’s experience of the justice system and his or her participation in the investigation and prosecution of the crime.

 

Each year, the week of May 15th is recognized as National Police Week in honor of the law enforcement personnel who provide the first crucial services to crime victims and in celebration of their brave efforts to keep us all safe.

 

The following resources are provided for law enforcement professionals.


Whenever a crime is committed, law enforcement officers are typically the first to arrive on the scene and to interact with victims. As a result, police officers have more contact with crime victims in the immediate aftermath of a crime than any other criminal justice professional. This makes their role critical and puts them in a unique position to meet victims’ needs immediately after the crime has occurred and encourage and facilitate the victim’s participation in the criminal justice system. An officer’s initial response to a victim will have a long-lasting impact on that individual’s experience of the justice system and his or her participation in the investigation and prosecution of the crime.

 

Each year, the week of May 15th is recognized as National Police Week in honor of the law enforcement personnel who provide the first crucial services to crime victims and in celebration of their brave efforts to keep us all safe.

 

The following resources are provided for law enforcement professionals.


Each month the Nation's experts answer your questions about best practices in victim services. Below are upcoming and most recent session discussions in this topic:

On Jan 29 2014 at 2:00PM, Mary Atlas-Terry, Victim Justice Program Specialist, OVC, and Corey Walz, Special Assistant to the Chair of the DHS Blue Campaign, and Katherine Chon, Senior Advisor on Trafficking in Persons, HHS, hosted a discussion on Implications of Human Trafficking Federal Strategic Action Plan

On May 15 2013 at 2:00PM, John Evans, National Training Manager for Victim Services at Mothers Against Drunk Driving, and Carl McDonald, National Law Enforcement Initiative Manager for Mothers Against Drunk Driving, hosted a discussion on Drunk Driving and Child Endangerment

On May 1 2013 at 2:00PM, Kim Clifton, Executive Director of HALOS (Helping And Lending Outreach Support), hosted a discussion on Replicating Victim Services Programs with Limited Funding

On Aug 22 2012 at 2:00PM, Ari Redbord, Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Columbia, and Derek Marsh, Lieutenant with Westminster Police Department in California, hosted a discussion on Implementing the Anti-Human Trafficking Task Force Model

On Jun 20 2012 at 2:00PM, John Firman, Director of the Research Division of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), and Raymond Rose, Chief of Police for the Village of Mundelein, Illinois, hosted a discussion on Enhancing Law Enforcement Responses to Crime Victims

Whenever a crime is committed, law enforcement officers are typically the first to arrive on the scene and to interact with victims. As a result, police officers have more contact with crime victims in the immediate aftermath of a crime than any other criminal justice professional. This makes their role critical and puts them in a unique position to meet victims’ needs immediately after the crime has occurred and encourage and facilitate the victim’s participation in the criminal justice system. An officer’s initial response to a victim will have a long-lasting impact on that individual’s experience of the justice system and his or her participation in the investigation and prosecution of the crime.

 

Each year, the week of May 15th is recognized as National Police Week in honor of the law enforcement personnel who provide the first crucial services to crime victims and in celebration of their brave efforts to keep us all safe.

 

The following resources are provided for law enforcement professionals.


When may I submit my nomination for the National Crime Victims' Service Awards?
The 2014 National Crime Victims' Service Awards nomination period is now closed. For more informatio... Read More

How can I order the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) DVD, Victims with Disabilities: A Forensic Interview-Training Techniques for Interviewing Victims with Communication or Cognitive Disabilities Training Kit, NCJ 234678?
The Victims with Disabilities: A Forensic Interview-Training Techniques for Interviewing Victims wit... Read More

How can I order the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) DVD, First Response to Victims of Crime, NCJ 211619?
The First Response to Victims of Crime DVD, NCJ 211619, can be ordered through the Shopping Cart sec... Read More

How can I order the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) First Response to Victims of Crime Guidebook, NCJ 231171?
The First Response to Victims of Crime: A Guidebook for Law Enforcement Officers, NCJ 231171, which ... Read More

When will National Crime Victims' Rights Week (NCVRW) be observed in 2014?
National Crime Victims' Rights Week (NCVRW) will be observed April 6-12, 2014. To learn more ab... Read More

More FAQs

Whenever a crime is committed, law enforcement officers are typically the first to arrive on the scene and to interact with victims. As a result, police officers have more contact with crime victims in the immediate aftermath of a crime than any other criminal justice professional. This makes their role critical and puts them in a unique position to meet victims’ needs immediately after the crime has occurred and encourage and facilitate the victim’s participation in the criminal justice system. An officer’s initial response to a victim will have a long-lasting impact on that individual’s experience of the justice system and his or her participation in the investigation and prosecution of the crime.

 

Each year, the week of May 15th is recognized as National Police Week in honor of the law enforcement personnel who provide the first crucial services to crime victims and in celebration of their brave efforts to keep us all safe.

 

The following resources are provided for law enforcement professionals.


FY 2014 Service, Support & Justice: A Strategy to Enhance Law Enforcement Response to Victims Demonstration Project (PDF 242 kb)
Deadline: 06/09/2014
OVC will make three awards of up to $100,000 each to implement the Enhancing Law Enforcement Response to Victims Strategy (ELERV) to improve agencies’ response to victims of crime, with a strong focus on reaching and serving underserved and unserved victims in the community. In the first phase of this project, successful applicants will conduct a comprehensive needs assessment in their jurisdiction and develop a plan for implementing the ELERV Strategy in the subsequent three project phases. Eligible applicants are limited to state, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies serving populations of 50,000 to 500,000. Those applying are urged to begin in advance of the June 9, 2014, deadline.

More Funding Opportunities

Whenever a crime is committed, law enforcement officers are typically the first to arrive on the scene and to interact with victims. As a result, police officers have more contact with crime victims in the immediate aftermath of a crime than any other criminal justice professional. This makes their role critical and puts them in a unique position to meet victims’ needs immediately after the crime has occurred and encourage and facilitate the victim’s participation in the criminal justice system. An officer’s initial response to a victim will have a long-lasting impact on that individual’s experience of the justice system and his or her participation in the investigation and prosecution of the crime.

 

Each year, the week of May 15th is recognized as National Police Week in honor of the law enforcement personnel who provide the first crucial services to crime victims and in celebration of their brave efforts to keep us all safe.

 

The following resources are provided for law enforcement professionals.


Publications

OVC and OVC-Sponsored Publications

Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services Final Report (May 2013) OVC, Report, 63 pages, NCJ 239957. The Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services initiative was launched by OVC in fall 2010 to expand the vision and impact of the crime victim assistance field. This Final Report provides a set of findings and broad recommendations, informed by stakeholder forums and literature reviews, that form a framework for strategic, transformative change. The Final Report outlines ways the field can overcome the obstacles it faces and change how it meets victims' needs and addresses those who perpetrate crime.
Abstract | PDF (Full Report) | PDF (Summary & Recommendations) | PDF (At a Glance Fact Sheet)
 
Office for Victims of Crime Training and Technical Assistance Center Fact Sheet (January 2013) OVC, Fact Sheet, OVC Fact Sheets, FS000394. This Fact Sheet describes the services and trainings available through the OVC Training and Technical Assistance Center (OVC TTAC) and how these resources can be accessed.
PDF
Part Of the OVC Fact Sheets Series
 
Directory of Training and Technical Assistance Resources for Anti-Human Trafficking Task Forces and Service Providers (December 2012) OVC, 26 pages, NCJ 240597. OVC and BJA have launched a Directory of Training and Technical Assistance Resources for Anti-Human Trafficking Task Forces and Service Providers. The directory includes "distance learning," "in-person training" and "training by request" opportunities. It is an excellent resource for practitioners and task forces actively working in the field to expand and enhance their knowledge.
Abstract | PDF | HTML
 
Promoting Effective Criminal Investigations of Campus Sex Crimes, Summary Report (November 2012) OVC, 53 pages, NCJ 240177. OVC, the Office on Violence Against Women, and the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services partnered with the International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators and the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights to conduct a forum that addressed the topic of enhancing criminal investigations of campus sex crimes. This report summarizes the discussion at the forum and provides a list of resources for those working to investigate sex crimes.
Abstract | PDF
 
Attorney General Guidelines for Victim and Witness Assistance 2011 Edition (Revised May 2012) (May 2012) OVC, 66 pages, NCJ 235121. These guidelines establish policy and provide guidance to be followed by U.S. Department of Justice personnel in their interactions with crime victims and witnesses. Effective October 1, 2011, these guidelines clarified DOJ's responsibilities to provide mandated rights and services enumerated in the Crime Victims’ Rights Act (CVRA) and the Victims' Rights and Restitution Act (VRRA) as well as other statutory requirements. Furthermore, the guidelines examine the unique requirements of vulnerable victims, including a recent update in May 2012 that addresses the scope of the federal child abuse reporting requirement under section 13031 of the Victims of Child Abuse Act of 1990, 42 U.S.C. § 13031.
Abstract | PDF
 

OJP Publications

Household Burglary, 1994-2011 (June 2013) BJS, Report, BJS Special Reports, 18 pages, NCJ 241754. This report presents rates and trends in household burglary from 1993 to 2011. The report explores overall trends in household burglary and examines patterns in completed household burglary by type and value of items stolen, percentage of burglaries reported to the police and insurance companies, and police response.
Part Of the BJS Special Reports Series
Abstract | PDF | HTML
 
Firearm Violence, 1993-2011 (May 2013) BJS, Report, BJS Special Reports, 28 pages, NCJ 241730. This report presents trends on the number and rate of fatal and nonfatal firearm violence from 1993 to 2011. The report examines incident and victim demographic characteristics of firearm violence, including the type of firearm used; victim's race, age, and sex; and incident location. The report also examines changes over time in the percentages of nonfatal firearm crimes by injury, reporting to the police, and the use of firearms in self-defense.
Part Of the BJS Special Reports Series
Abstract | PDF | TEXT
 
Untested Evidence in Sexual Assault Cases (February 2013) NIJ-Sponsored, 6 pages, NCJ 241356. In this article from the Sexual Assault Report™, NIJ staff member Nancy Ritter explores: whether every sexual assault kit (SAK) should be tested every kit - even ones that are 25 years old; should priority be given to certain kits, and if so, how do we decide; and how to handle cases in which the alleged perpetrator is already known. The article also explains where the weak spots are in collecting, storing, and testing kits; why the police might not send sexual assault kits to be tested; and what early evidence is showing about complex issues such as victim notification.
Abstract | PDF
 
Directory of Training and Technical Assistance Resources for Anti-Human Trafficking Task Forces and Service Providers (December 2012) BJA, 26 pages, NCJ 240597. OVC and BJA have launched a Directory of Training and Technical Assistance Resources for Anti-Human Trafficking Task Forces and Service Providers. The directory includes "distance learning," "in-person training" and "training by request" opportunities. It is an excellent resource for practitioners and task forces actively working in the field to expand and enhance their knowledge.
Abstract | PDF | HTML
 
Victimizations Not Reported to the Police, 2006-2010 (August 2012) BJS, Report, BJS Special Reports, 18 pages, NCJ 238536. This report presents findings, for a five-year period from 2006 to 2010, on the characteristics of crime victimizations that went unreported to police, according to data from the National Crime Victimization Survey. The characteristics examined in this report include the type of crime, whether it involved a weapon or injury, the victim-offender relationship, and demographic characteristics of the victim. For each of the characteristics examined, the report also details victims' rationale for not reporting to the police, including beliefs that the police would not or could not help, that the crime was not important enough to report, or fear of reprisal or getting the offender into trouble. The report also examines trends from 1994 to 2010 in the types of crime not reported to the police and the reasons victimizations went unreported.
Part Of the BJS Special Reports Series
Abstract | PDF | TEXT
 

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Related Resources

OVC Funded Resources

Enhancing Law Enforcement Response to Victims
For over a decade, the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) has collaborated with OVC to promote crime victim rights and facilitate law enforcement's ability to effectively address victim needs. One of the key milestones of this collaboration includes the 21st Century Strategy for Enhancing Law Enforcement Response to Victims, consisting of the Strategy, the Implementation Guide, the Resource Toolkit, and the Training Supplemental. This Web site, which captures the 21st Century Strategy and a number of other victim-related materials and publications, serves as a unique law enforcement resource center for enhanced victim response.
 
Identity Theft Victim Assistance Network Project
The Maryland Crime Victims' Resource Center, Inc. (MCVRC), with funding from OVC, this project seeks to improve the response (infrastructure, training, outreach tools, and direct victim assistance services) to victims of identity theft nationwide.
 
The Use of Technology to Stalk: An Online Course
Produced by the Stalking Resource Center of the National Center for Victims of Crime with funding from OVC, this free self-paced, interactive online training will help increase the ability of criminal justice professionals and victim service providers to recognize how stalkers use technology and, ultimately, enhance their ability to work with victims of stalking. This course highlights: how stalkers use technologies to locate, harass, and surveil their victims; steps to assist in investigating stalking crimes; and how to support victims of stalking.
 

Federal Resources

Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI)
The FBI is the principal investigative arm of the U.S. Department of Justice. Its mission is to protect the United States from terrorist and foreign intelligence activities; investigate violations of federal criminal law; and provide assistance to federal, state, local, and international agencies.
 
Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3)
IC3 allows users to file complaints online. Its Web site also offers statistics, scam alerts, and fraud prevention tips. The program is a partnership between the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the National White Collar Crime Center.
 
National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs)
NamUs, is the first national online repository for missing persons and unidentified dead cases. This initiative brings together two innovative, searchable databases to provide a powerful tool for law enforcement agencies, medical examiners and coroners, victim advocates, and the general public to search for matches between missing persons and unidentified human remains records. Other resources provided include links to state clearinghouses, medical examiner and coroner offices, law enforcement agencies, victim assistance groups and pertinent legislation.
 
National Sex Offender Public Web Site
This online, searchable database of sex offenders is the result of a cooperative effort between the state agencies hosting public sexual offender registries and the Federal Government. The Federal site centralizes the different sex offender registries built and maintained by State and territories and provides real-time access to public sex offender data nationwide with a single Internet search. This Web site allows parents and concerned citizens to search existing public state and territory sex offender registries beyond their own communities.
 
U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE): Human Trafficking
ICE's Human Smuggling and Trafficking Unit works to identify criminals and organizations involved in illicit human trafficking and human smuggling activities.
 

Non-Governmental Resources

Anti-Defamation League (ADL)
ADL helps victims of discrimination or bias-motivated violence achieve redress of justifiable grievances through mediation, administration, or judicial means. It also provides information and training to law enforcement agencies on responding to victims of bias crimes.
 
Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE)
ACFE is an anti-fraud organization and provider of anti-fraud training and education.
 
Concerns of Police Survivors (COPS)
COPS provides resources to help rebuild the lives of survivors of law enforcement officers killed in the line of duty.
 
International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators
IACLEA promotes campus safety by providing educational resources, advocacy, and professional development.
 
Sexual Assault Family Violence Investigators Course (SAFVIC)
The SAFVIC Program is designed to provide law enforcement officers with the tools they need to effectively investigate and prevent sexual assault and family violence.
 

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Web Forum Discussions

Each month the Nation's experts answer your questions about best practices in victim services. Below are upcoming and most recent session discussions in this topic:

On Jan 29 2014 at 2:00PM, Mary Atlas-Terry, Victim Justice Program Specialist, OVC, and Corey Walz, Special Assistant to the Chair of the DHS Blue Campaign, and Katherine Chon, Senior Advisor on Trafficking in Persons, HHS, hosted a discussion on Implications of Human Trafficking Federal Strategic Action Plan

On May 15 2013 at 2:00PM, John Evans, National Training Manager for Victim Services at Mothers Against Drunk Driving, and Carl McDonald, National Law Enforcement Initiative Manager for Mothers Against Drunk Driving, hosted a discussion on Drunk Driving and Child Endangerment

On May 1 2013 at 2:00PM, Kim Clifton, Executive Director of HALOS (Helping And Lending Outreach Support), hosted a discussion on Replicating Victim Services Programs with Limited Funding

On Aug 22 2012 at 2:00PM, Ari Redbord, Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Columbia, and Derek Marsh, Lieutenant with Westminster Police Department in California, hosted a discussion on Implementing the Anti-Human Trafficking Task Force Model

On Jun 20 2012 at 2:00PM, John Firman, Director of the Research Division of the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP), and Raymond Rose, Chief of Police for the Village of Mundelein, Illinois, hosted a discussion on Enhancing Law Enforcement Responses to Crime Victims


FAQs

When may I submit my nomination for the National Crime Victims' Service Awards?
The 2014 National Crime Victims' Service Awards nomination period is now closed. For more informatio... Read More

How can I order the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) DVD, Victims with Disabilities: A Forensic Interview-Training Techniques for Interviewing Victims with Communication or Cognitive Disabilities Training Kit, NCJ 234678?
The Victims with Disabilities: A Forensic Interview-Training Techniques for Interviewing Victims wit... Read More

How can I order the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) DVD, First Response to Victims of Crime, NCJ 211619?
The First Response to Victims of Crime DVD, NCJ 211619, can be ordered through the Shopping Cart sec... Read More

How can I order the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) First Response to Victims of Crime Guidebook, NCJ 231171?
The First Response to Victims of Crime: A Guidebook for Law Enforcement Officers, NCJ 231171, which ... Read More

When will National Crime Victims' Rights Week (NCVRW) be observed in 2014?
National Crime Victims' Rights Week (NCVRW) will be observed April 6-12, 2014. To learn more ab... Read More

Back to Top


Funding

FY 2014 Service, Support & Justice: A Strategy to Enhance Law Enforcement Response to Victims Demonstration Project (PDF 242 kb)
Deadline: 06/09/2014
OVC will make three awards of up to $100,000 each to implement the Enhancing Law Enforcement Response to Victims Strategy (ELERV) to improve agencies’ response to victims of crime, with a strong focus on reaching and serving underserved and unserved victims in the community. In the first phase of this project, successful applicants will conduct a comprehensive needs assessment in their jurisdiction and develop a plan for implementing the ELERV Strategy in the subsequent three project phases. Eligible applicants are limited to state, local, and tribal law enforcement agencies serving populations of 50,000 to 500,000. Those applying are urged to begin in advance of the June 9, 2014, deadline.

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National Calendar of Crime Victim Assistance-Related Events
Upcoming Event(s)
National Congress of American Indians Mid-Year Conference & Tradeshow
Anchorage, AK
06/08/2014-06/11/2014

National Sheriffs' Association (NSA) Annual Conference and Exhibition
Fort Worth, TX
06/20/2014-06/25/2014

National Center for Victims of Crime 2014 National Training Institute
Miami, FL
09/17/2014-09/19/2014

Online Directory of Crime Victims Services.