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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

  • Publications (13)
  • Resources (19)
  • Forum Discussions (5)
  • FAQs (2)
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Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a traumatic or life-threatening event, such as a violent personal assault, child or adult sexual abuse, a terrorist attack, military combat, a serious accident, or a natural disaster; or following the sudden injury or unexpected death of a loved one. Strong physical and emotional reactions are the body’s natural response in the immediate aftermath of a traumatic event; however, people with PTSD feel stressed and frightened several weeks, months, or even years later, when they are no longer in danger. If left untreated, individuals with PTSD may develop other problems, such as depression, relationship problems, physical symptoms or illnesses, employment problems, and substance abuse. PTSD is also common in children and youth who have been exposed to violence or trauma or have experienced the sudden death of a loved one.

The following resources provide additional information on responding to individuals with PTSD.


OVC and OVC-Sponsored Publications

2016 National Crime Victims' Rights Week (NCVRW) Resource Guide (2016) OVC, 108 pages, NCJ 249210.
The 2016 NCVRW Resource Guide, released ahead of National Crime Victims’ Rights Week, April 10 to 16, highlights this year’s theme, Serving Victims. Building Trust. Restoring Hope. The Guide includes user-friendly outreach tools and sample products, information on the history of victims’ rights in the United States, and practical ideas to show how serving victims and building trust restores hope and strengthens communities. The Guide is available in both English and Spanish.
Abstract | PDF (English) | PDF (Spanish) | HTML (English) | HTML (Spanish)
 
2016 National Crime Victims' Rights Week (NCVRW) Poster (2015) OVC, PS000030.
The 2016 NCVRW Theme Poster evokes the theme-Serving Victims. Building Trust. Restoring Hope.—which underscores the importance of early intervention and victim services in establishing trust with victims, which in turn begins to restore their hope for healing and recovery. The poster is available for download in in color or black and white and can be customized by your organization before printing.
PDF (Color, 22' x 28') | PDF (Black and White, 22' x 28') | PDF (Customizable, Color) | PDF (Customizable, Black and White)
 
Helping Victims of Mass Violence and Terrorism: Planning, Response, Recovery, and Resources (August 2015) OVC, NCJ 248647.
This toolkit is designed to help communities prepare for and respond to victims of mass violence and terrorism in the most timely, effective, and compassionate manner possible. OVC created this product in coordination with the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Office for Victim Assistance and DOJ's Office of Justice for Victims of Overseas Terrorism.
Abstract | HTML
 
Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services Final Report (May 2013) OVC, Report, 63 pages, NCJ 239957.
The Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services initiative was launched by OVC in fall 2010 to expand the vision and impact of the crime victim assistance field. This Final Report provides a set of findings and broad recommendations, informed by stakeholder forums and literature reviews, that form a framework for strategic, transformative change. The Final Report outlines ways the field can overcome the obstacles it faces and change how it meets victims' needs and addresses those who perpetrate crime.
Abstract | PDF (Full Report) | PDF (Summary & Recommendations) | PDF (At a Glance Fact Sheet)
 
What You Can Do if You Are a Victim of Crime (2010) OVC, Fact Sheet, OVC Fact Sheets, BC000790.
This OVC brochure explains the rights of victims of crime and the compensation and assistance resources available to them. It also lists national organizations that help victims find information or obtain referrals.
PDF | HTML
Part Of the OVC Fact Sheets Series
 

OJP Publications

Mental Health Response to Mass Violence and Terrorism: A Field Guide (2005) Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 38 pages, NCJ 205452.
This guide is intended for service providers and professionals in the mental health field providing the basics in responding and assisting those victims and families during the aftermath of mass violence and terrorism.
Abstract | PDF
 
Mental Health Response to Mass Violence and Terrorism: A Training Manual (January 2004) Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Report, 192 pages, NCJ 205451.
This training manual provides guidance for developing and implementing training that will prepare mental health and crime-victim service providers with the knowledge and skill to help victims, survivors, and the community-at-large cope with and recover from terrorist and other events that involve mass violence.
Abstract | PDF
 

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Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a traumatic or life-threatening event, such as a violent personal assault, child or adult sexual abuse, a terrorist attack, military combat, a serious accident, or a natural disaster; or following the sudden injury or unexpected death of a loved one. Strong physical and emotional reactions are the body’s natural response in the immediate aftermath of a traumatic event; however, people with PTSD feel stressed and frightened several weeks, months, or even years later, when they are no longer in danger. If left untreated, individuals with PTSD may develop other problems, such as depression, relationship problems, physical symptoms or illnesses, employment problems, and substance abuse. PTSD is also common in children and youth who have been exposed to violence or trauma or have experienced the sudden death of a loved one.

The following resources provide additional information on responding to individuals with PTSD.


Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a traumatic or life-threatening event, such as a violent personal assault, child or adult sexual abuse, a terrorist attack, military combat, a serious accident, or a natural disaster; or following the sudden injury or unexpected death of a loved one. Strong physical and emotional reactions are the body’s natural response in the immediate aftermath of a traumatic event; however, people with PTSD feel stressed and frightened several weeks, months, or even years later, when they are no longer in danger. If left untreated, individuals with PTSD may develop other problems, such as depression, relationship problems, physical symptoms or illnesses, employment problems, and substance abuse. PTSD is also common in children and youth who have been exposed to violence or trauma or have experienced the sudden death of a loved one.

The following resources provide additional information on responding to individuals with PTSD.


Each month the Nation's experts answer your questions about best practices in victim services. Below are upcoming and most recent session discussions in this topic:

On Feb 24 2016 at 2:00PM, Dr. John Rich, MD, MPH, Professor and Chair of Health Management and Policy at the Drexel University School of Public Health, and Linnea Ashley, MPH, Training and Advocacy Manager at Youth ALIVE!, hosted a discussion on Inner City Posttraumatic Stress

On Apr 23 2014 at 2:00PM, Dr David Corwin, President of the Academy on Violence and Abuse, Professor in Pediatrics Department at University of Utah, and Dr James Henry, Cofounder and Project Director for the Western Michigan University (WMU) Children's Trauma Assessment Center, hosted a discussion on Implications of Adverse Childhood Experiences for Practitioners

On Mar 12 2014 at 2:00PM, Steve Dakai, Director of Maehnowesekiyah Wellness Center for the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin, and Program Manager for the Menominee Indian Tri, and Lydia Watts, Deputy Director of the District of Columbia Access to Justice Commission, hosted a discussion on Addressing the Holistic Needs of Crime Victims

On Apr 27 2011 at 2:00PM, Andrea Cardona, founder of FLA Four Legged Advocates, Inc, and Curtis Allen, manager with Tooele County Children’s Justice Center’s Healing Paws program, hosted a discussion on Using Therapy Dogs to Respond to Child Victims

On Nov 5 2008 at 2:00PM, Dan Levey, President of the National Organization of Parents of Murdered Children, Inc, and Debra Puglisi Sharp, member of the Board of Directors of the National Coalition of Victims in Action, hosted a discussion on Empowering Victims to Triumph Over Tragedy

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a traumatic or life-threatening event, such as a violent personal assault, child or adult sexual abuse, a terrorist attack, military combat, a serious accident, or a natural disaster; or following the sudden injury or unexpected death of a loved one. Strong physical and emotional reactions are the body’s natural response in the immediate aftermath of a traumatic event; however, people with PTSD feel stressed and frightened several weeks, months, or even years later, when they are no longer in danger. If left untreated, individuals with PTSD may develop other problems, such as depression, relationship problems, physical symptoms or illnesses, employment problems, and substance abuse. PTSD is also common in children and youth who have been exposed to violence or trauma or have experienced the sudden death of a loved one.

The following resources provide additional information on responding to individuals with PTSD.


How can I order OVC publications and products?
Many OVC publications and products are available in hardcopy and can be ordered from the National Cr... Read More

What is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)?
Information about Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and other mental health issues is available ... Read More

More FAQs

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a traumatic or life-threatening event, such as a violent personal assault, child or adult sexual abuse, a terrorist attack, military combat, a serious accident, or a natural disaster; or following the sudden injury or unexpected death of a loved one. Strong physical and emotional reactions are the body’s natural response in the immediate aftermath of a traumatic event; however, people with PTSD feel stressed and frightened several weeks, months, or even years later, when they are no longer in danger. If left untreated, individuals with PTSD may develop other problems, such as depression, relationship problems, physical symptoms or illnesses, employment problems, and substance abuse. PTSD is also common in children and youth who have been exposed to violence or trauma or have experienced the sudden death of a loved one.

The following resources provide additional information on responding to individuals with PTSD.


No funding records found relevant to this topic.

More Funding Opportunities

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a traumatic or life-threatening event, such as a violent personal assault, child or adult sexual abuse, a terrorist attack, military combat, a serious accident, or a natural disaster; or following the sudden injury or unexpected death of a loved one. Strong physical and emotional reactions are the body’s natural response in the immediate aftermath of a traumatic event; however, people with PTSD feel stressed and frightened several weeks, months, or even years later, when they are no longer in danger. If left untreated, individuals with PTSD may develop other problems, such as depression, relationship problems, physical symptoms or illnesses, employment problems, and substance abuse. PTSD is also common in children and youth who have been exposed to violence or trauma or have experienced the sudden death of a loved one.

The following resources provide additional information on responding to individuals with PTSD.


Publications

OVC and OVC-Sponsored Publications

2016 National Crime Victims' Rights Week (NCVRW) Resource Guide (2016) OVC, 108 pages, NCJ 249210. The 2016 NCVRW Resource Guide, released ahead of National Crime Victims’ Rights Week, April 10 to 16, highlights this year’s theme, Serving Victims. Building Trust. Restoring Hope. The Guide includes user-friendly outreach tools and sample products, information on the history of victims’ rights in the United States, and practical ideas to show how serving victims and building trust restores hope and strengthens communities. The Guide is available in both English and Spanish.
Abstract | PDF (English) | PDF (Spanish) | HTML (English) | HTML (Spanish)
 
2016 National Crime Victims' Rights Week (NCVRW) Poster (2015) OVC, PS000030. The 2016 NCVRW Theme Poster evokes the theme-Serving Victims. Building Trust. Restoring Hope.—which underscores the importance of early intervention and victim services in establishing trust with victims, which in turn begins to restore their hope for healing and recovery. The poster is available for download in in color or black and white and can be customized by your organization before printing.
PDF (Color, 22' x 28') | PDF (Black and White, 22' x 28') | PDF (Customizable, Color) | PDF (Customizable, Black and White)
 
Helping Victims of Mass Violence and Terrorism: Planning, Response, Recovery, and Resources (August 2015) OVC, NCJ 248647. This toolkit is designed to help communities prepare for and respond to victims of mass violence and terrorism in the most timely, effective, and compassionate manner possible. OVC created this product in coordination with the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Office for Victim Assistance and DOJ's Office of Justice for Victims of Overseas Terrorism.
Abstract | HTML
 
Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services Final Report (May 2013) OVC, Report, 63 pages, NCJ 239957. The Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services initiative was launched by OVC in fall 2010 to expand the vision and impact of the crime victim assistance field. This Final Report provides a set of findings and broad recommendations, informed by stakeholder forums and literature reviews, that form a framework for strategic, transformative change. The Final Report outlines ways the field can overcome the obstacles it faces and change how it meets victims' needs and addresses those who perpetrate crime.
Abstract | PDF (Full Report) | PDF (Summary & Recommendations) | PDF (At a Glance Fact Sheet)
 
What You Can Do if You Are a Victim of Crime (2010) OVC, Fact Sheet, OVC Fact Sheets, BC000790. This OVC brochure explains the rights of victims of crime and the compensation and assistance resources available to them. It also lists national organizations that help victims find information or obtain referrals.
PDF | HTML
Part Of the OVC Fact Sheets Series
 

OJP Publications

Mental Health Response to Mass Violence and Terrorism: A Field Guide (2005) Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 38 pages, NCJ 205452. This guide is intended for service providers and professionals in the mental health field providing the basics in responding and assisting those victims and families during the aftermath of mass violence and terrorism.
Abstract | PDF
 
Mental Health Response to Mass Violence and Terrorism: A Training Manual (January 2004) Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Report, 192 pages, NCJ 205451. This training manual provides guidance for developing and implementing training that will prepare mental health and crime-victim service providers with the knowledge and skill to help victims, survivors, and the community-at-large cope with and recover from terrorist and other events that involve mass violence.
Abstract | PDF
 

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Related Resources

OVC Funded Resources

9/11 Remembrance: Resources Compiled by OVC
This section of the OVC site contains a list of government and nonprofit organizations, programs, publications, and events related to September 11th and victims of terrorism. Created for the observance of the 10th anniversary of September 11, 2001, these resources continue to provide useful information and assistance to victim service professionals and the public.
 

Federal Resources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS)
NISVS provides data on rape, physical violence, and stalking by an intimate partner in the United States along with rates of health and mental health problems associated with victimization.
 
National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS)
Sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs, NCJRS offers information on victimology and victim assistance, criminal justice, juvenile justice, information to support research, policy, and program development worldwide. NCJRS supplies the victim services field with resources, publications, and program information. The NCJRS library collection includes more than 30,000 resources relevant to the field.
 
National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP)
NREPP is a searchable online registry of more than hundreds of interventions supporting mental health promotion, substance abuse prevention, and mental health and substance abuse treatment.
 
September 11th Victim Compensation Fund
The September 11th Victim Compensation Fund (VCF) has been reinstated and will provide compensation for any individual (or a personal representative of a deceased individual) who suffered physical harm or was killed as a result of the terrorist-related aircraft crashes of September 11, 2001, or the debris removal efforts that took place in the immediate aftermath of those crashes. On January 2, 2011, President Obama signed into law the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act of 2010 (P.L. 111-347) which expands the pool of applicants eligible for the Fund to include individuals who experienced injuries associated with the attacks or subsequent debris removal. The VCF site allows users to obtain a list of the kinds of documents and information needed in order to process claims; register for the VCF online, the first step in submitting your claim; fill out an online eligibility form to determine VCF eligibility; submit a claim online; and review Frequently Asked Questions.
 
U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs: National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
The Center aims to advance the clinical care and social welfare of America's veterans through research, education, and training in the science, diagnosis, and treatment of PTSD and stress-related disorders. This Web site is provided as an educational resource concerning PTSD and other enduring consequences of traumatic stress, for a variety of audiences.
 

Non-Governmental Resources

American Psychiatric Association
The American Psychiatric Association works to ensure humane care and effective treatment for all persons with mental disorders, including mental retardation and substance-related disorders.
 
International Critical Incident Stress Foundation, Inc. (ICISF)
The mission of ICISF is to provide leadership, education, training, consultation, and support services in comprehensive crisis intervention and disaster behavioral health services to the emergency response professions, other organizations, and communities worldwide.
 
International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (ISTSS)
ISTSS shares information about the effects of trauma, reducing traumatic stressors, and clinical strategies. Its Web site offers journals and related resources for the public, professionals, and the media.
 
National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)
NCTSN works to raise the standard of care and improve access to services for traumatized children, their families and communities throughout the United States.
 
Trauma Intervention Program Inc. (TIP)
TIP assists citizen volunteers who respond to traumatic incidents at the request of police, fire and hospital personnel to support those who are emotionally traumatized.
 

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Web Forum Discussions

Each month the Nation's experts answer your questions about best practices in victim services. Below are upcoming and most recent session discussions in this topic:

On Feb 24 2016 at 2:00PM, Dr. John Rich, MD, MPH, Professor and Chair of Health Management and Policy at the Drexel University School of Public Health, and Linnea Ashley, MPH, Training and Advocacy Manager at Youth ALIVE!, hosted a discussion on Inner City Posttraumatic Stress

On Apr 23 2014 at 2:00PM, Dr David Corwin, President of the Academy on Violence and Abuse, Professor in Pediatrics Department at University of Utah, and Dr James Henry, Cofounder and Project Director for the Western Michigan University (WMU) Children's Trauma Assessment Center, hosted a discussion on Implications of Adverse Childhood Experiences for Practitioners

On Mar 12 2014 at 2:00PM, Steve Dakai, Director of Maehnowesekiyah Wellness Center for the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin, and Program Manager for the Menominee Indian Tri, and Lydia Watts, Deputy Director of the District of Columbia Access to Justice Commission, hosted a discussion on Addressing the Holistic Needs of Crime Victims

On Apr 27 2011 at 2:00PM, Andrea Cardona, founder of FLA Four Legged Advocates, Inc, and Curtis Allen, manager with Tooele County Children’s Justice Center’s Healing Paws program, hosted a discussion on Using Therapy Dogs to Respond to Child Victims

On Nov 5 2008 at 2:00PM, Dan Levey, President of the National Organization of Parents of Murdered Children, Inc, and Debra Puglisi Sharp, member of the Board of Directors of the National Coalition of Victims in Action, hosted a discussion on Empowering Victims to Triumph Over Tragedy


FAQs

How can I order OVC publications and products?
Many OVC publications and products are available in hardcopy and can be ordered from the National Cr... Read More

What is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)?
Information about Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and other mental health issues is available ... Read More

Back to Top


Funding

No funding records found relevant to this topic.

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EventsDirectoryE-Mail UpdatesRSS
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National Calendar of Crime Victim Assistance-Related Events
Upcoming Event(s)
2016 Crime Victim Law Conference
Portland, OR
06/10/2016-06/11/2016

2016 National Center for Victims of Crime National Training Institute
Philadelphia, PA
09/19/2016-09/21/2016

Online Directory of Crime Victims Services.