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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

  • Publications (9)
  • Resources (19)
  • Forum Discussions (5)
  • FAQs (2)
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Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a traumatic or life-threatening event, such as a violent personal assault, child or adult sexual abuse, a terrorist attack, military combat, a serious accident, or a natural disaster; or following the sudden injury or unexpected death of a loved one. Strong physical and emotional reactions are the body’s natural response in the immediate aftermath of a traumatic event; however, people with PTSD feel stressed and frightened several weeks, months, or even years later, when they are no longer in danger. If left untreated, individuals with PTSD may develop other problems, such as depression, relationship problems, physical symptoms or illnesses, employment problems, and substance abuse. PTSD is also common in children and youth who have been exposed to violence or trauma or have experienced the sudden death of a loved one.

The following resources provide additional information on responding to individuals with PTSD.


OVC and OVC-Sponsored Publications

Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services Final Report (May 2013) OVC, Report, 63 pages, NCJ 239957.
The Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services initiative was launched by OVC in fall 2010 to expand the vision and impact of the crime victim assistance field. This Final Report provides a set of findings and broad recommendations, informed by stakeholder forums and literature reviews, that form a framework for strategic, transformative change. The Final Report outlines ways the field can overcome the obstacles it faces and change how it meets victims' needs and addresses those who perpetrate crime.
Abstract | PDF (Full Report) | PDF (Summary & Recommendations) | PDF (At a Glance Fact Sheet)
 
Victim Impact: Listen and Learn Curriculum (February 2009) OVC, 286 pages, NCJ 224257.
This OVC-funded curriculum is geared toward helping offenders to become aware of the impact that crime has on victims and then to take responsibility and make amends for their actions. The online-only curriculum consists of 13 units, built around 10 core crime topics: property crime, assault, robbery, hate and bias, gang violence, sexual assault, child abuse and neglect, domestic violence, drunk and impaired driving, and homicide, plus chapters on implementing the program, the victim experience and making amends to victims. Victims and survivors speak about their experiences in the accompanying video clips.
Abstract | PDF (Facilitator Manual, Part 1) | PDF (Facilitator Manual, Part 2) | PDF (Participant Workbook) | HTML
 
Victim Impact: Listen and Learn (September 2008) OVC, OVC Videos, 0 pages, NCJ 223072.
This 57-minute DVD features the first-person accounts of 14 men and women who share their experiences as crime victims and the ripple effect that victimization can have on family members and the community at large. It is an effective training resource for victim service providers seeking to improve their understanding of the physical, emotional, financial, and psychological effects of crime.
Abstract | HTML (Clip Transcript) | HTML (Electronic Only Curriculum) | Video (WMV Video Clip)
Part Of the OVC Videos Series
 
Mental Health Response to Mass Violence and Terrorism: A Field Guide (2005) OVC, 38 pages, NCJ 205452.
This guide is intended for service providers and professionals in the mental health field providing the basics in responding and assisting those victims and families during the aftermath of mass violence and terrorism.
Abstract | PDF
 
Responding to Victims of Terrorism and Mass Violence Crimes: Coordination and Collaboration Between American Red Cross Workers and Crime Victim Service Providers (September 2005) OVC, 19 pages, NCJ 209681.
This booklet, jointly published by OVC and the American Red Cross (ARC), provides information on how ARC staff and volunteers can better assist victims of terrorism and mass violence crimes. It focuses on victims’ rights and needs, OVC resources, victim compensation and assistance, and key differences between the needs of victims of crime and victims of natural disasters.
Abstract | PDF | HTML
 

OJP Publications

Mental Health Response to Mass Violence and Terrorism: A Field Guide (2005) Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 38 pages, NCJ 205452.
This guide is intended for service providers and professionals in the mental health field providing the basics in responding and assisting those victims and families during the aftermath of mass violence and terrorism.
Abstract | PDF
 
Mental Health Response to Mass Violence and Terrorism: A Training Manual (January 2004) Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Report, 192 pages, NCJ 205451.
This training manual provides guidance for developing and implementing training that will prepare mental health and crime-victim service providers with the knowledge and skill to help victims, survivors, and the community-at-large cope with and recover from terrorist and other events that involve mass violence.
Abstract | PDF
 

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Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a traumatic or life-threatening event, such as a violent personal assault, child or adult sexual abuse, a terrorist attack, military combat, a serious accident, or a natural disaster; or following the sudden injury or unexpected death of a loved one. Strong physical and emotional reactions are the body’s natural response in the immediate aftermath of a traumatic event; however, people with PTSD feel stressed and frightened several weeks, months, or even years later, when they are no longer in danger. If left untreated, individuals with PTSD may develop other problems, such as depression, relationship problems, physical symptoms or illnesses, employment problems, and substance abuse. PTSD is also common in children and youth who have been exposed to violence or trauma or have experienced the sudden death of a loved one.

The following resources provide additional information on responding to individuals with PTSD.


Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a traumatic or life-threatening event, such as a violent personal assault, child or adult sexual abuse, a terrorist attack, military combat, a serious accident, or a natural disaster; or following the sudden injury or unexpected death of a loved one. Strong physical and emotional reactions are the body’s natural response in the immediate aftermath of a traumatic event; however, people with PTSD feel stressed and frightened several weeks, months, or even years later, when they are no longer in danger. If left untreated, individuals with PTSD may develop other problems, such as depression, relationship problems, physical symptoms or illnesses, employment problems, and substance abuse. PTSD is also common in children and youth who have been exposed to violence or trauma or have experienced the sudden death of a loved one.

The following resources provide additional information on responding to individuals with PTSD.


Each month the Nation's experts answer your questions about best practices in victim services. Below are upcoming and most recent session discussions in this topic:

On Apr 23 2014 at 2:00PM, Dr David Corwin, President of the Academy on Violence and Abuse, Professor in Pediatrics Department at University of Utah, and Dr James Henry, Cofounder and Project Director for the Western Michigan University (WMU) Children's Trauma Assessment Center, hosted a discussion on Implications of Adverse Childhood Experiences for Practitioners

On Mar 12 2014 at 2:00PM, Steve Dakai, Director of Maehnowesekiyah Wellness Center for the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin, and Program Manager for the Menominee Indian Tri, and Lydia Watts, Deputy Director of the District of Columbia Access to Justice Commission, hosted a discussion on Addressing the Holistic Needs of Crime Victims

On Apr 27 2011 at 2:00PM, Andrea Cardona, founder of FLA Four Legged Advocates, Inc, and Curtis Allen, manager with Tooele County Children’s Justice Center’s Healing Paws program, hosted a discussion on Using Therapy Dogs to Respond to Child Victims

On Nov 5 2008 at 2:00PM, Dan Levey, President of the National Organization of Parents of Murdered Children, Inc, and Debra Puglisi Sharp, member of the Board of Directors of the National Coalition of Victims in Action, hosted a discussion on Empowering Victims to Triumph Over Tragedy

On Aug 28 2008 at 2:00PM, Bill Jenkins, author of "What To Do When the Police Leave: A Guide to the First Days of Traumatic Loss", and Janice Harris Lord, author of "I’ll Never Forget Those Words: A Practical Guide to Death Notification", hosted a discussion on Delivering Victim-Sensitive Death Notifications

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a traumatic or life-threatening event, such as a violent personal assault, child or adult sexual abuse, a terrorist attack, military combat, a serious accident, or a natural disaster; or following the sudden injury or unexpected death of a loved one. Strong physical and emotional reactions are the body’s natural response in the immediate aftermath of a traumatic event; however, people with PTSD feel stressed and frightened several weeks, months, or even years later, when they are no longer in danger. If left untreated, individuals with PTSD may develop other problems, such as depression, relationship problems, physical symptoms or illnesses, employment problems, and substance abuse. PTSD is also common in children and youth who have been exposed to violence or trauma or have experienced the sudden death of a loved one.

The following resources provide additional information on responding to individuals with PTSD.


How can I order OVC publications and products?
Many OVC publications and products are available in hardcopy and can be ordered from the National Cr... Read More

What is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)?
Information about Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and other mental health issues is available ... Read More

More FAQs

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a traumatic or life-threatening event, such as a violent personal assault, child or adult sexual abuse, a terrorist attack, military combat, a serious accident, or a natural disaster; or following the sudden injury or unexpected death of a loved one. Strong physical and emotional reactions are the body’s natural response in the immediate aftermath of a traumatic event; however, people with PTSD feel stressed and frightened several weeks, months, or even years later, when they are no longer in danger. If left untreated, individuals with PTSD may develop other problems, such as depression, relationship problems, physical symptoms or illnesses, employment problems, and substance abuse. PTSD is also common in children and youth who have been exposed to violence or trauma or have experienced the sudden death of a loved one.

The following resources provide additional information on responding to individuals with PTSD.


No funding records found relevant to this topic.

More Funding Opportunities

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a traumatic or life-threatening event, such as a violent personal assault, child or adult sexual abuse, a terrorist attack, military combat, a serious accident, or a natural disaster; or following the sudden injury or unexpected death of a loved one. Strong physical and emotional reactions are the body’s natural response in the immediate aftermath of a traumatic event; however, people with PTSD feel stressed and frightened several weeks, months, or even years later, when they are no longer in danger. If left untreated, individuals with PTSD may develop other problems, such as depression, relationship problems, physical symptoms or illnesses, employment problems, and substance abuse. PTSD is also common in children and youth who have been exposed to violence or trauma or have experienced the sudden death of a loved one.

The following resources provide additional information on responding to individuals with PTSD.


Publications

OVC and OVC-Sponsored Publications

Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services Final Report (May 2013) OVC, Report, 63 pages, NCJ 239957. The Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services initiative was launched by OVC in fall 2010 to expand the vision and impact of the crime victim assistance field. This Final Report provides a set of findings and broad recommendations, informed by stakeholder forums and literature reviews, that form a framework for strategic, transformative change. The Final Report outlines ways the field can overcome the obstacles it faces and change how it meets victims' needs and addresses those who perpetrate crime.
Abstract | PDF (Full Report) | PDF (Summary & Recommendations) | PDF (At a Glance Fact Sheet)
 
Victim Impact: Listen and Learn Curriculum (February 2009) OVC, 286 pages, NCJ 224257. This OVC-funded curriculum is geared toward helping offenders to become aware of the impact that crime has on victims and then to take responsibility and make amends for their actions. The online-only curriculum consists of 13 units, built around 10 core crime topics: property crime, assault, robbery, hate and bias, gang violence, sexual assault, child abuse and neglect, domestic violence, drunk and impaired driving, and homicide, plus chapters on implementing the program, the victim experience and making amends to victims. Victims and survivors speak about their experiences in the accompanying video clips.
Abstract | PDF (Facilitator Manual, Part 1) | PDF (Facilitator Manual, Part 2) | PDF (Participant Workbook) | HTML
 
Victim Impact: Listen and Learn (September 2008) OVC, OVC Videos, 0 pages, NCJ 223072. This 57-minute DVD features the first-person accounts of 14 men and women who share their experiences as crime victims and the ripple effect that victimization can have on family members and the community at large. It is an effective training resource for victim service providers seeking to improve their understanding of the physical, emotional, financial, and psychological effects of crime.
Abstract | HTML (Clip Transcript) | HTML (Electronic Only Curriculum) | Video (WMV Video Clip)
Part Of the OVC Videos Series
 
Mental Health Response to Mass Violence and Terrorism: A Field Guide (2005) OVC, 38 pages, NCJ 205452. This guide is intended for service providers and professionals in the mental health field providing the basics in responding and assisting those victims and families during the aftermath of mass violence and terrorism.
Abstract | PDF
 
Responding to Victims of Terrorism and Mass Violence Crimes: Coordination and Collaboration Between American Red Cross Workers and Crime Victim Service Providers (September 2005) OVC, 19 pages, NCJ 209681. This booklet, jointly published by OVC and the American Red Cross (ARC), provides information on how ARC staff and volunteers can better assist victims of terrorism and mass violence crimes. It focuses on victims’ rights and needs, OVC resources, victim compensation and assistance, and key differences between the needs of victims of crime and victims of natural disasters.
Abstract | PDF | HTML
 

OJP Publications

Mental Health Response to Mass Violence and Terrorism: A Field Guide (2005) Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 38 pages, NCJ 205452. This guide is intended for service providers and professionals in the mental health field providing the basics in responding and assisting those victims and families during the aftermath of mass violence and terrorism.
Abstract | PDF
 
Mental Health Response to Mass Violence and Terrorism: A Training Manual (January 2004) Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Report, 192 pages, NCJ 205451. This training manual provides guidance for developing and implementing training that will prepare mental health and crime-victim service providers with the knowledge and skill to help victims, survivors, and the community-at-large cope with and recover from terrorist and other events that involve mass violence.
Abstract | PDF
 

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Related Resources

OVC Funded Resources

9/11 Remembrance: Resources Compiled by OVC
This section of the OVC site contains a list of government and nonprofit organizations, programs, publications, and events related to September 11th and victims of terrorism. Created for the observance of the 10th anniversary of September 11, 2001, these resources continue to provide useful information and assistance to victim service professionals and the public.
 

Federal Resources

Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS)
CMHS works in partnership with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) in overseeing national efforts to provide emergency mental health services to survivors of Presidentially declared disasters.
 
CrimeSolutions.gov
CrimeSolutions.gov is a searchable online database of evidence-based programs covering a range of justice-related topics, including victim assistance programs; corrections; courts; crime prevention; substance abuse; juveniles; law enforcement; and technology and forensics. The site is a tool to understand, access and integrate scientific evidence about programs into programmatic and policy decisions.
 
National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS)
Sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs, NCJRS offers information on victimology and victim assistance, criminal justice, juvenile justice, information to support research, policy, and program development worldwide. NCJRS supplies the victim services field with resources, publications, and program information. The NCJRS library collection includes more than 30,000 resources relevant to the field.
 
U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs: National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
The Center aims to advance the clinical care and social welfare of America's veterans through research, education, and training in the science, diagnosis, and treatment of PTSD and stress-related disorders. This Web site is provided as an educational resource concerning PTSD and other enduring consequences of traumatic stress, for a variety of audiences.
 
World Trade Center Health Program
This program monitors, screens, treats and supports responders who responded to the disaster site at the World Trade Center in New York City and who may have been affected physically or mentally by their service. The site is designed to provide information related to all aspects of the World Trade Center Health Program, to highlight new developments in the program as they occur, and to help individuals find information of particular interest for them.
 

Non-Governmental Resources

American Psychiatric Association
The American Psychiatric Association works to ensure humane care and effective treatment for all persons with mental disorders, including mental retardation and substance-related disorders.
 
American Psychological Association (APA)
APA offers information on PTSD and a Disaster Response Network, which includes more than 1,500 psychologists who volunteer to provide free, onsite mental health services to disaster survivors and the relief workers who assist them.
 
Gift from Within
This international organization is dedicated to those who suffer post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), those at risk for PTSD, and those who care for traumatized individuals. Gift From Within provides survivors and caretakers with a peer support network and develops and disseminates educational materials including videotapes, articles, and books.
 
International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (ISTSS)
ISTSS shares information about the effects of trauma, reducing traumatic stressors, and clinical strategies. Its Web site offers journals and related resources for the public, professionals, and the media.
 
National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)
NCTSN works to raise the standard of care and improve access to services for traumatized children, their families and communities throughout the United States.
 

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Web Forum Discussions

Each month the Nation's experts answer your questions about best practices in victim services. Below are upcoming and most recent session discussions in this topic:

On Apr 23 2014 at 2:00PM, Dr David Corwin, President of the Academy on Violence and Abuse, Professor in Pediatrics Department at University of Utah, and Dr James Henry, Cofounder and Project Director for the Western Michigan University (WMU) Children's Trauma Assessment Center, hosted a discussion on Implications of Adverse Childhood Experiences for Practitioners

On Mar 12 2014 at 2:00PM, Steve Dakai, Director of Maehnowesekiyah Wellness Center for the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin, and Program Manager for the Menominee Indian Tri, and Lydia Watts, Deputy Director of the District of Columbia Access to Justice Commission, hosted a discussion on Addressing the Holistic Needs of Crime Victims

On Apr 27 2011 at 2:00PM, Andrea Cardona, founder of FLA Four Legged Advocates, Inc, and Curtis Allen, manager with Tooele County Children’s Justice Center’s Healing Paws program, hosted a discussion on Using Therapy Dogs to Respond to Child Victims

On Nov 5 2008 at 2:00PM, Dan Levey, President of the National Organization of Parents of Murdered Children, Inc, and Debra Puglisi Sharp, member of the Board of Directors of the National Coalition of Victims in Action, hosted a discussion on Empowering Victims to Triumph Over Tragedy

On Aug 28 2008 at 2:00PM, Bill Jenkins, author of "What To Do When the Police Leave: A Guide to the First Days of Traumatic Loss", and Janice Harris Lord, author of "I’ll Never Forget Those Words: A Practical Guide to Death Notification", hosted a discussion on Delivering Victim-Sensitive Death Notifications


FAQs

How can I order OVC publications and products?
Many OVC publications and products are available in hardcopy and can be ordered from the National Cr... Read More

What is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)?
Information about Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and other mental health issues is available ... Read More

Back to Top


Funding

No funding records found relevant to this topic.

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EventsDirectoryE-Mail UpdatesRSS
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National Calendar of Crime Victim Assistance-Related Events
Upcoming Event(s)
40th National Organization for Victim Assistance (NOVA) Conference
Chicago, IL
08/17/2014-08/20/2014

2014 Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) National Training Conference
Boston, MA
08/19/2014-08/21/2014

14th National Indian Nations Conference: Justice for Victims of Crime
Palm Springs, CA
12/11/2014-12/14/2014

Online Directory of Crime Victims Services.