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Post Traumatic Stress Disorder

  • Publications (12)
  • Resources (18)
  • Forum Discussions (5)
  • FAQs (2)
  • Funding (2)
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Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a traumatic or life-threatening event, such as a violent personal assault, child or adult sexual abuse, a terrorist attack, military combat, a serious accident, or a natural disaster; or following the sudden injury or unexpected death of a loved one. Strong physical and emotional reactions are the body’s natural response in the immediate aftermath of a traumatic event; however, people with PTSD feel stressed and frightened several weeks, months, or even years later, when they are no longer in danger. If left untreated, individuals with PTSD may develop other problems, such as depression, relationship problems, physical symptoms or illnesses, employment problems, and substance abuse. PTSD is also common in children and youth who have been exposed to violence or trauma or have experienced the sudden death of a loved one.

The following resources provide additional information on responding to individuals with PTSD.


OVC and OVC-Sponsored Publications

Partners in Justice - Bureau of Indian Affairs Victim Specialists (December 2016) OVC, OVC Videos, 2 pages, NCJ 250461.
This video presents an overview of the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Victim Specialist Program. The video, prepared by OVC and BIA, identifies some of the program’s successes and challenges providing services to victims of crime in Indian Country.
Abstract | HTML
Part Of the OVC Videos Series
 
Helping Victims of Mass Violence and Terrorism: Planning, Response, Recovery, and Resources (August 2015) OVC, NCJ 248647.
This toolkit is designed to help communities prepare for and respond to victims of mass violence and terrorism in the most timely, effective, and compassionate manner possible. OVC created this product in coordination with the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Office for Victim Assistance and DOJ's Office of Justice for Victims of Overseas Terrorism.
Abstract | HTML
 
Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services Final Report (May 2013) OVC, Report, 60 pages, NCJ 239957.
The Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services initiative was launched by OVC in fall 2010 to expand the vision and impact of the crime victim assistance field. This Final Report provides a set of findings and broad recommendations, informed by stakeholder forums and literature reviews, that form a framework for strategic, transformative change. The Final Report outlines ways the field can overcome the obstacles it faces and change how it meets victims' needs and addresses those who perpetrate crime.
Abstract | PDF (Full Report) | PDF (Summary & Recommendations) | PDF (At a Glance Fact Sheet)
 
What You Can Do if You Are a Victim of Crime (2010) OVC, Fact Sheet, OVC Fact Sheets, BC000790.
This OVC brochure explains the rights of victims of crime and the compensation and assistance resources available to them. It also lists national organizations that help victims find information or obtain referrals.
PDF | HTML
Part Of the OVC Fact Sheets Series
 
Victim Impact: Listen and Learn Curriculum (February 2009) OVC, 286 pages, NCJ 224257.
This OVC-funded curriculum is geared toward helping offenders to become aware of the impact that crime has on victims and then to take responsibility and make amends for their actions. The online-only curriculum consists of 13 units, built around 10 core crime topics: property crime, assault, robbery, hate and bias, gang violence, sexual assault, child abuse and neglect, domestic violence, drunk and impaired driving, and homicide, plus chapters on implementing the program, the victim experience and making amends to victims. Victims and survivors speak about their experiences in the accompanying video clips.
Abstract | PDF (Facilitator Manual, Part 1) | PDF (Facilitator Manual, Part 2) | PDF (Participant Workbook) | HTML
 

OJP Publications

Mental Health Response to Mass Violence and Terrorism: A Field Guide (2005) Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 38 pages, NCJ 205452.
This guide is intended for service providers and professionals in the mental health field providing the basics in responding and assisting those victims and families during the aftermath of mass violence and terrorism.
Abstract | PDF
 
Mental Health Response to Mass Violence and Terrorism: A Training Manual (January 2004) Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Report, 192 pages, NCJ 205451.
This training manual provides guidance for developing and implementing training that will prepare mental health and crime-victim service providers with the knowledge and skill to help victims, survivors, and the community-at-large cope with and recover from terrorist and other events that involve mass violence.
Abstract | PDF
 

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Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a traumatic or life-threatening event, such as a violent personal assault, child or adult sexual abuse, a terrorist attack, military combat, a serious accident, or a natural disaster; or following the sudden injury or unexpected death of a loved one. Strong physical and emotional reactions are the body’s natural response in the immediate aftermath of a traumatic event; however, people with PTSD feel stressed and frightened several weeks, months, or even years later, when they are no longer in danger. If left untreated, individuals with PTSD may develop other problems, such as depression, relationship problems, physical symptoms or illnesses, employment problems, and substance abuse. PTSD is also common in children and youth who have been exposed to violence or trauma or have experienced the sudden death of a loved one.

The following resources provide additional information on responding to individuals with PTSD.


Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a traumatic or life-threatening event, such as a violent personal assault, child or adult sexual abuse, a terrorist attack, military combat, a serious accident, or a natural disaster; or following the sudden injury or unexpected death of a loved one. Strong physical and emotional reactions are the body’s natural response in the immediate aftermath of a traumatic event; however, people with PTSD feel stressed and frightened several weeks, months, or even years later, when they are no longer in danger. If left untreated, individuals with PTSD may develop other problems, such as depression, relationship problems, physical symptoms or illnesses, employment problems, and substance abuse. PTSD is also common in children and youth who have been exposed to violence or trauma or have experienced the sudden death of a loved one.

The following resources provide additional information on responding to individuals with PTSD.


Each month the Nation's experts answer your questions about best practices in victim services. Below are upcoming and most recent session discussions in this topic:

On Sep 27 2016 at 2:00PM, Krista Flannigan, J.D., Director, Institute for Crime Victim Research & Policy at Florida State University, and Karen Thomas, President of the Connections Training Group, LLC, hosted a discussion on Serving Victims of Mass Violence

On Feb 24 2016 at 2:00PM, Dr. John Rich, MD, MPH, Professor and Chair of Health Management and Policy at the Drexel University School of Public Health, and Linnea Ashley, MPH, Training and Advocacy Manager at Youth ALIVE!, hosted a discussion on Inner City Posttraumatic Stress

On Apr 23 2014 at 2:00PM, Dr David Corwin, President of the Academy on Violence and Abuse, Professor in Pediatrics Department at University of Utah, and Dr James Henry, Cofounder and Project Director for the Western Michigan University (WMU) Children's Trauma Assessment Center, hosted a discussion on Implications of Adverse Childhood Experiences for Practitioners

On Mar 12 2014 at 2:00PM, Steve Dakai, Director of Maehnowesekiyah Wellness Center for the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin, and Program Manager for the Menominee Indian Tri, and Lydia Watts, Deputy Director of the District of Columbia Access to Justice Commission, hosted a discussion on Addressing the Holistic Needs of Crime Victims

On Apr 27 2011 at 2:00PM, Andrea Cardona, founder of FLA Four Legged Advocates, Inc, and Curtis Allen, manager with Tooele County Children’s Justice Center’s Healing Paws program, hosted a discussion on Using Therapy Dogs to Respond to Child Victims

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a traumatic or life-threatening event, such as a violent personal assault, child or adult sexual abuse, a terrorist attack, military combat, a serious accident, or a natural disaster; or following the sudden injury or unexpected death of a loved one. Strong physical and emotional reactions are the body’s natural response in the immediate aftermath of a traumatic event; however, people with PTSD feel stressed and frightened several weeks, months, or even years later, when they are no longer in danger. If left untreated, individuals with PTSD may develop other problems, such as depression, relationship problems, physical symptoms or illnesses, employment problems, and substance abuse. PTSD is also common in children and youth who have been exposed to violence or trauma or have experienced the sudden death of a loved one.

The following resources provide additional information on responding to individuals with PTSD.


How can I order OVC publications and products?
Many OVC publications and products are available in hardcopy and can be ordered from the National Cr... Read More

What is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)?
Information about Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and other mental health issues is available ... Read More

More FAQs

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a traumatic or life-threatening event, such as a violent personal assault, child or adult sexual abuse, a terrorist attack, military combat, a serious accident, or a natural disaster; or following the sudden injury or unexpected death of a loved one. Strong physical and emotional reactions are the body’s natural response in the immediate aftermath of a traumatic event; however, people with PTSD feel stressed and frightened several weeks, months, or even years later, when they are no longer in danger. If left untreated, individuals with PTSD may develop other problems, such as depression, relationship problems, physical symptoms or illnesses, employment problems, and substance abuse. PTSD is also common in children and youth who have been exposed to violence or trauma or have experienced the sudden death of a loved one.

The following resources provide additional information on responding to individuals with PTSD.


FY 2017 Vision 21 Integrated Services for Victims Program: Increasing Access to Mental Health Services for Victims of Crime (PDF 537 kb)
Deadline: 08/10/2017
OVC seeks to bridge the divide between crime victims, victim service providers, and mental health service providers so communities are able to create a seamless network of services to assist crime victims. OVC anticipates making awards under five purpose areas. Purpose Area 1 aids victim services providers properly identify crime victims who may be exhibiting signs of suicidality, refer them to appropriate mental health services, and support their access to such services. Purpose Area 2 will provide funding for direct services (2A) and TTA (2B) to increase the capacity of both victim and mental health service providers to provide mental health services to victims of domestic violence and sexual assault who also have a severe mental illness. Purpose Area 3 will provide funding for direct services (3A) and TTA (3B) to increase access to mental health services for traditionally underserved victims of crime. Apply by August 10, 2017.


FY 2017 Mass Violence and Victimization Resource Center (PDF 272 kb)
Deadline: 08/09/2017
OVC recognizes that federal, state, local, and tribal government and organizations must become better prepared and equipped to appropriately plan for, respond to, and fully support victims and communities affected by mass violence. The goal of this solicitation is to establish a Mass Violence Center. Working collaboratively with OVC, the successful applicant will develop a national victim-centric framework, applicable to various jurisdictions, which addresses best practices in preparing for and responding to incidents of mass violence and domestic terrorism through training and technical assistance, identifying/creating best practices, and expanding expertise in this field. OVC expects to make one award of up to $18,000,000 for a 36-month performance period, to begin on October 1, 2017. Apply by August 9, 2017.

More Funding Opportunities

Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a traumatic or life-threatening event, such as a violent personal assault, child or adult sexual abuse, a terrorist attack, military combat, a serious accident, or a natural disaster; or following the sudden injury or unexpected death of a loved one. Strong physical and emotional reactions are the body’s natural response in the immediate aftermath of a traumatic event; however, people with PTSD feel stressed and frightened several weeks, months, or even years later, when they are no longer in danger. If left untreated, individuals with PTSD may develop other problems, such as depression, relationship problems, physical symptoms or illnesses, employment problems, and substance abuse. PTSD is also common in children and youth who have been exposed to violence or trauma or have experienced the sudden death of a loved one.

The following resources provide additional information on responding to individuals with PTSD.


Publications

OVC and OVC-Sponsored Publications

Partners in Justice - Bureau of Indian Affairs Victim Specialists (December 2016) OVC, OVC Videos, 2 pages, NCJ 250461. This video presents an overview of the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Victim Specialist Program. The video, prepared by OVC and BIA, identifies some of the program’s successes and challenges providing services to victims of crime in Indian Country.
Abstract | HTML
Part Of the OVC Videos Series
 
Helping Victims of Mass Violence and Terrorism: Planning, Response, Recovery, and Resources (August 2015) OVC, NCJ 248647. This toolkit is designed to help communities prepare for and respond to victims of mass violence and terrorism in the most timely, effective, and compassionate manner possible. OVC created this product in coordination with the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Office for Victim Assistance and DOJ's Office of Justice for Victims of Overseas Terrorism.
Abstract | HTML
 
Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services Final Report (May 2013) OVC, Report, 60 pages, NCJ 239957. The Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services initiative was launched by OVC in fall 2010 to expand the vision and impact of the crime victim assistance field. This Final Report provides a set of findings and broad recommendations, informed by stakeholder forums and literature reviews, that form a framework for strategic, transformative change. The Final Report outlines ways the field can overcome the obstacles it faces and change how it meets victims' needs and addresses those who perpetrate crime.
Abstract | PDF (Full Report) | PDF (Summary & Recommendations) | PDF (At a Glance Fact Sheet)
 
What You Can Do if You Are a Victim of Crime (2010) OVC, Fact Sheet, OVC Fact Sheets, BC000790. This OVC brochure explains the rights of victims of crime and the compensation and assistance resources available to them. It also lists national organizations that help victims find information or obtain referrals.
PDF | HTML
Part Of the OVC Fact Sheets Series
 
Victim Impact: Listen and Learn Curriculum (February 2009) OVC, 286 pages, NCJ 224257. This OVC-funded curriculum is geared toward helping offenders to become aware of the impact that crime has on victims and then to take responsibility and make amends for their actions. The online-only curriculum consists of 13 units, built around 10 core crime topics: property crime, assault, robbery, hate and bias, gang violence, sexual assault, child abuse and neglect, domestic violence, drunk and impaired driving, and homicide, plus chapters on implementing the program, the victim experience and making amends to victims. Victims and survivors speak about their experiences in the accompanying video clips.
Abstract | PDF (Facilitator Manual, Part 1) | PDF (Facilitator Manual, Part 2) | PDF (Participant Workbook) | HTML
 

OJP Publications

Mental Health Response to Mass Violence and Terrorism: A Field Guide (2005) Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 38 pages, NCJ 205452. This guide is intended for service providers and professionals in the mental health field providing the basics in responding and assisting those victims and families during the aftermath of mass violence and terrorism.
Abstract | PDF
 
Mental Health Response to Mass Violence and Terrorism: A Training Manual (January 2004) Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Report, 192 pages, NCJ 205451. This training manual provides guidance for developing and implementing training that will prepare mental health and crime-victim service providers with the knowledge and skill to help victims, survivors, and the community-at-large cope with and recover from terrorist and other events that involve mass violence.
Abstract | PDF
 

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Related Resources

Federal Resources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS)
NISVS provides data on rape, physical violence, and stalking by an intimate partner in the United States along with rates of health and mental health problems associated with victimization.
 
CrimeSolutions.gov
CrimeSolutions.gov is a searchable online database of evidence-based programs covering a range of justice-related topics, including victim assistance programs; corrections; courts; crime prevention; substance abuse; juveniles; law enforcement; and technology and forensics. The site is a tool to understand, access and integrate scientific evidence about programs into programmatic and policy decisions.
 
National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS)
Sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs, NCJRS offers information on victimology and victim assistance, criminal justice, juvenile justice, information to support research, policy, and program development worldwide. NCJRS supplies the victim services field with resources, publications, and program information. The NCJRS library collection includes more than 30,000 resources relevant to the field.
 
National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP)
NREPP is a searchable online registry of more than hundreds of interventions supporting mental health promotion, substance abuse prevention, and mental health and substance abuse treatment.
 
U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs: National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
The Center aims to advance the clinical care and social welfare of America's veterans through research, education, and training in the science, diagnosis, and treatment of PTSD and stress-related disorders. This Web site is provided as an educational resource concerning PTSD and other enduring consequences of traumatic stress, for a variety of audiences.
 

Non-Governmental Resources

Academy on Violence and Abuse
AVA exists to advance health education and research on the prevention, recognition and treatment of the health effects of violence and abuse.
 
American Psychiatric Association
The American Psychiatric Association works to ensure humane care and effective treatment for all persons with mental disorders, including mental retardation and substance-related disorders.
 
International Critical Incident Stress Foundation, Inc. (ICISF)
The mission of ICISF is to provide leadership, education, training, consultation, and support services in comprehensive crisis intervention and disaster behavioral health services to the emergency response professions, other organizations, and communities worldwide.
 
International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies (ISTSS)
ISTSS shares information about the effects of trauma, reducing traumatic stressors, and clinical strategies. Its Web site offers journals and related resources for the public, professionals, and the media.
 
National Child Traumatic Stress Network (NCTSN)
NCTSN works to raise the standard of care and improve access to services for traumatized children, their families and communities throughout the United States.
 

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Web Forum Discussions

Each month the Nation's experts answer your questions about best practices in victim services. Below are upcoming and most recent session discussions in this topic:

On Sep 27 2016 at 2:00PM, Krista Flannigan, J.D., Director, Institute for Crime Victim Research & Policy at Florida State University, and Karen Thomas, President of the Connections Training Group, LLC, hosted a discussion on Serving Victims of Mass Violence

On Feb 24 2016 at 2:00PM, Dr. John Rich, MD, MPH, Professor and Chair of Health Management and Policy at the Drexel University School of Public Health, and Linnea Ashley, MPH, Training and Advocacy Manager at Youth ALIVE!, hosted a discussion on Inner City Posttraumatic Stress

On Apr 23 2014 at 2:00PM, Dr David Corwin, President of the Academy on Violence and Abuse, Professor in Pediatrics Department at University of Utah, and Dr James Henry, Cofounder and Project Director for the Western Michigan University (WMU) Children's Trauma Assessment Center, hosted a discussion on Implications of Adverse Childhood Experiences for Practitioners

On Mar 12 2014 at 2:00PM, Steve Dakai, Director of Maehnowesekiyah Wellness Center for the Menominee Indian Tribe of Wisconsin, and Program Manager for the Menominee Indian Tri, and Lydia Watts, Deputy Director of the District of Columbia Access to Justice Commission, hosted a discussion on Addressing the Holistic Needs of Crime Victims

On Apr 27 2011 at 2:00PM, Andrea Cardona, founder of FLA Four Legged Advocates, Inc, and Curtis Allen, manager with Tooele County Children’s Justice Center’s Healing Paws program, hosted a discussion on Using Therapy Dogs to Respond to Child Victims


FAQs

How can I order OVC publications and products?
Many OVC publications and products are available in hardcopy and can be ordered from the National Cr... Read More

What is Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)?
Information about Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and other mental health issues is available ... Read More

Back to Top


Funding

FY 2017 Vision 21 Integrated Services for Victims Program: Increasing Access to Mental Health Services for Victims of Crime (PDF 537 kb)
Deadline: 08/10/2017
OVC seeks to bridge the divide between crime victims, victim service providers, and mental health service providers so communities are able to create a seamless network of services to assist crime victims. OVC anticipates making awards under five purpose areas. Purpose Area 1 aids victim services providers properly identify crime victims who may be exhibiting signs of suicidality, refer them to appropriate mental health services, and support their access to such services. Purpose Area 2 will provide funding for direct services (2A) and TTA (2B) to increase the capacity of both victim and mental health service providers to provide mental health services to victims of domestic violence and sexual assault who also have a severe mental illness. Purpose Area 3 will provide funding for direct services (3A) and TTA (3B) to increase access to mental health services for traditionally underserved victims of crime. Apply by August 10, 2017.


FY 2017 Mass Violence and Victimization Resource Center (PDF 272 kb)
Deadline: 08/09/2017
OVC recognizes that federal, state, local, and tribal government and organizations must become better prepared and equipped to appropriately plan for, respond to, and fully support victims and communities affected by mass violence. The goal of this solicitation is to establish a Mass Violence Center. Working collaboratively with OVC, the successful applicant will develop a national victim-centric framework, applicable to various jurisdictions, which addresses best practices in preparing for and responding to incidents of mass violence and domestic terrorism through training and technical assistance, identifying/creating best practices, and expanding expertise in this field. OVC expects to make one award of up to $18,000,000 for a 36-month performance period, to begin on October 1, 2017. Apply by August 9, 2017.

Back to Top


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National Calendar of Crime Victim Assistance-Related Events
Upcoming Event(s)
National Organization for Victim Assistance Conference
San Diego, CA
08/14/2017-08/17/2017

2017 Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) National Training Conference
Washington, DC
08/15/2017-08/17/2017

National Center for Victims of Crime National Training Institute
Portland, OR
12/05/2017-12/07/2017

Online Directory of Crime Victims Services.