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Compassion Fatigue

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  • Resources (3)
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Compassion fatigue, also known as vicarious trauma or secondary trauma, is a secondary traumatic stress disorder that is common among individuals who work directly with victims of trauma. Sufferers of compassion fatigue may include victim advocates, mental health professionals, law enforcement, prosecutors, medical professionals and other first responders. Individuals may exhibit symptoms such as hopelessness, constant stress and anxiety, a pervasive negative attitude, and a decrease in the pleasure they find in activities they used to enjoy. These symptoms can have detrimental effects, both professionally and personally, and can result in decreased productivity, the inability to focus, and the development of feelings of incompetency and self-doubt. Vicarious trauma may also contribute to high staff turnover in many human service programs.

 

Learning to recognize compassion fatigue and manage its symptoms are the first steps toward healing. The following resources can help you recognize the causes and symptoms of compassion fatigue and learn how to manage or minimize their impact.


OVC and OVC-Sponsored Publications

Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services Final Report (May 2013) OVC, Report, 63 pages, NCJ 239957.
The Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services initiative was launched by OVC in fall 2010 to expand the vision and impact of the crime victim assistance field. This Final Report provides a set of findings and broad recommendations, informed by stakeholder forums and literature reviews, that form a framework for strategic, transformative change. The Final Report outlines ways the field can overcome the obstacles it faces and change how it meets victims' needs and addresses those who perpetrate crime.
Abstract | PDF (Full Report) | PDF (Summary & Recommendations) | PDF (At a Glance Fact Sheet)
 
Victim Impact: Listen and Learn Curriculum (February 2009) OVC, 286 pages, NCJ 224257.
This OVC-funded curriculum is geared toward helping offenders to become aware of the impact that crime has on victims and then to take responsibility and make amends for their actions. The online-only curriculum consists of 13 units, built around 10 core crime topics: property crime, assault, robbery, hate and bias, gang violence, sexual assault, child abuse and neglect, domestic violence, drunk and impaired driving, and homicide, plus chapters on implementing the program, the victim experience and making amends to victims. Victims and survivors speak about their experiences in the accompanying video clips.
Abstract | PDF (Facilitator Manual, Part 1) | PDF (Facilitator Manual, Part 2) | PDF (Participant Workbook) | HTML
 
Victim Impact: Listen and Learn (September 2008) OVC, OVC Videos, 0 pages, NCJ 223072.
This 57-minute DVD features the first-person accounts of 14 men and women who share their experiences as crime victims and the ripple effect that victimization can have on family members and the community at large. It is an effective training resource for victim service providers seeking to improve their understanding of the physical, emotional, financial, and psychological effects of crime.
Abstract | HTML (Clip Transcript) | HTML (Electronic Only Curriculum) | Video (WMV Video Clip)
Part Of the OVC Videos Series
 

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Compassion fatigue, also known as vicarious trauma or secondary trauma, is a secondary traumatic stress disorder that is common among individuals who work directly with victims of trauma. Sufferers of compassion fatigue may include victim advocates, mental health professionals, law enforcement, prosecutors, medical professionals and other first responders. Individuals may exhibit symptoms such as hopelessness, constant stress and anxiety, a pervasive negative attitude, and a decrease in the pleasure they find in activities they used to enjoy. These symptoms can have detrimental effects, both professionally and personally, and can result in decreased productivity, the inability to focus, and the development of feelings of incompetency and self-doubt. Vicarious trauma may also contribute to high staff turnover in many human service programs.

 

Learning to recognize compassion fatigue and manage its symptoms are the first steps toward healing. The following resources can help you recognize the causes and symptoms of compassion fatigue and learn how to manage or minimize their impact.


Compassion fatigue, also known as vicarious trauma or secondary trauma, is a secondary traumatic stress disorder that is common among individuals who work directly with victims of trauma. Sufferers of compassion fatigue may include victim advocates, mental health professionals, law enforcement, prosecutors, medical professionals and other first responders. Individuals may exhibit symptoms such as hopelessness, constant stress and anxiety, a pervasive negative attitude, and a decrease in the pleasure they find in activities they used to enjoy. These symptoms can have detrimental effects, both professionally and personally, and can result in decreased productivity, the inability to focus, and the development of feelings of incompetency and self-doubt. Vicarious trauma may also contribute to high staff turnover in many human service programs.

 

Learning to recognize compassion fatigue and manage its symptoms are the first steps toward healing. The following resources can help you recognize the causes and symptoms of compassion fatigue and learn how to manage or minimize their impact.


Each month the Nation's experts answer your questions about best practices in victim services. Below are upcoming and most recent session discussions in this topic:

On Jan 27 2012 at 2:00PM, Karen Kalergis, Associate Director of Education and Communications at the Institute on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault at the University of Texas, and Janice Harris Lord, licensed social worker, professional counselor, and private consultant on crime victims' issues, hosted a discussion on Building Resiliency Within Victim Service Organizations

On Mar 14 2007 at 2:00PM, Ms. Barbara Rubel, Executive Director of the Griefwork Center, Inc. and bereavement specialist, hosted a discussion on Best Practices for Coping With Vicarious Trauma

On Jul 6 2005 at 2:00PM, Viki Sharp, Employee Assistance Program Administrator for the Arizona Department of Corrections, hosted a discussion on Compassion Fatigue

Compassion fatigue, also known as vicarious trauma or secondary trauma, is a secondary traumatic stress disorder that is common among individuals who work directly with victims of trauma. Sufferers of compassion fatigue may include victim advocates, mental health professionals, law enforcement, prosecutors, medical professionals and other first responders. Individuals may exhibit symptoms such as hopelessness, constant stress and anxiety, a pervasive negative attitude, and a decrease in the pleasure they find in activities they used to enjoy. These symptoms can have detrimental effects, both professionally and personally, and can result in decreased productivity, the inability to focus, and the development of feelings of incompetency and self-doubt. Vicarious trauma may also contribute to high staff turnover in many human service programs.

 

Learning to recognize compassion fatigue and manage its symptoms are the first steps toward healing. The following resources can help you recognize the causes and symptoms of compassion fatigue and learn how to manage or minimize their impact.


How can I order OVC publications and products?
Many OVC publications and products are available in hardcopy and can be ordered from the National Cr... Read More

More FAQs

Compassion fatigue, also known as vicarious trauma or secondary trauma, is a secondary traumatic stress disorder that is common among individuals who work directly with victims of trauma. Sufferers of compassion fatigue may include victim advocates, mental health professionals, law enforcement, prosecutors, medical professionals and other first responders. Individuals may exhibit symptoms such as hopelessness, constant stress and anxiety, a pervasive negative attitude, and a decrease in the pleasure they find in activities they used to enjoy. These symptoms can have detrimental effects, both professionally and personally, and can result in decreased productivity, the inability to focus, and the development of feelings of incompetency and self-doubt. Vicarious trauma may also contribute to high staff turnover in many human service programs.

 

Learning to recognize compassion fatigue and manage its symptoms are the first steps toward healing. The following resources can help you recognize the causes and symptoms of compassion fatigue and learn how to manage or minimize their impact.


No funding records found relevant to this topic.

More Funding Opportunities

Compassion fatigue, also known as vicarious trauma or secondary trauma, is a secondary traumatic stress disorder that is common among individuals who work directly with victims of trauma. Sufferers of compassion fatigue may include victim advocates, mental health professionals, law enforcement, prosecutors, medical professionals and other first responders. Individuals may exhibit symptoms such as hopelessness, constant stress and anxiety, a pervasive negative attitude, and a decrease in the pleasure they find in activities they used to enjoy. These symptoms can have detrimental effects, both professionally and personally, and can result in decreased productivity, the inability to focus, and the development of feelings of incompetency and self-doubt. Vicarious trauma may also contribute to high staff turnover in many human service programs.

 

Learning to recognize compassion fatigue and manage its symptoms are the first steps toward healing. The following resources can help you recognize the causes and symptoms of compassion fatigue and learn how to manage or minimize their impact.


Publications

OVC and OVC-Sponsored Publications

Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services Final Report (May 2013) OVC, Report, 63 pages, NCJ 239957. The Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services initiative was launched by OVC in fall 2010 to expand the vision and impact of the crime victim assistance field. This Final Report provides a set of findings and broad recommendations, informed by stakeholder forums and literature reviews, that form a framework for strategic, transformative change. The Final Report outlines ways the field can overcome the obstacles it faces and change how it meets victims' needs and addresses those who perpetrate crime.
Abstract | PDF (Full Report) | PDF (Summary & Recommendations) | PDF (At a Glance Fact Sheet)
 
Victim Impact: Listen and Learn Curriculum (February 2009) OVC, 286 pages, NCJ 224257. This OVC-funded curriculum is geared toward helping offenders to become aware of the impact that crime has on victims and then to take responsibility and make amends for their actions. The online-only curriculum consists of 13 units, built around 10 core crime topics: property crime, assault, robbery, hate and bias, gang violence, sexual assault, child abuse and neglect, domestic violence, drunk and impaired driving, and homicide, plus chapters on implementing the program, the victim experience and making amends to victims. Victims and survivors speak about their experiences in the accompanying video clips.
Abstract | PDF (Facilitator Manual, Part 1) | PDF (Facilitator Manual, Part 2) | PDF (Participant Workbook) | HTML
 
Victim Impact: Listen and Learn (September 2008) OVC, OVC Videos, 0 pages, NCJ 223072. This 57-minute DVD features the first-person accounts of 14 men and women who share their experiences as crime victims and the ripple effect that victimization can have on family members and the community at large. It is an effective training resource for victim service providers seeking to improve their understanding of the physical, emotional, financial, and psychological effects of crime.
Abstract | HTML (Clip Transcript) | HTML (Electronic Only Curriculum) | Video (WMV Video Clip)
Part Of the OVC Videos Series
 

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Related Resources

Federal Resources

U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs: National Center for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)
The Center aims to advance the clinical care and social welfare of America's veterans through research, education, and training in the science, diagnosis, and treatment of PTSD and stress-related disorders. This Web site is provided as an educational resource concerning PTSD and other enduring consequences of traumatic stress, for a variety of audiences.
 

Non-Governmental Resources

Gift from Within
This international organization is dedicated to those who suffer post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), those at risk for PTSD, and those who care for traumatized individuals. Gift From Within provides survivors and caretakers with a peer support network and develops and disseminates educational materials including videotapes, articles, and books.
 
Sidran Traumatic Stress Institute, Inc.
Sidran offers information to empower survivors, educate loved ones, and support clinicians. This nonprofit institute runs many programs, including Sidran Press, the Psychtrauma Infobase, and the Tamar project for treating incarcerated women suffering from trauma and abuse.
 

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Web Forum Discussions

Each month the Nation's experts answer your questions about best practices in victim services. Below are upcoming and most recent session discussions in this topic:

On Jan 27 2012 at 2:00PM, Karen Kalergis, Associate Director of Education and Communications at the Institute on Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault at the University of Texas, and Janice Harris Lord, licensed social worker, professional counselor, and private consultant on crime victims' issues, hosted a discussion on Building Resiliency Within Victim Service Organizations

On Mar 14 2007 at 2:00PM, Ms. Barbara Rubel, Executive Director of the Griefwork Center, Inc. and bereavement specialist, hosted a discussion on Best Practices for Coping With Vicarious Trauma

On Jul 6 2005 at 2:00PM, Viki Sharp, Employee Assistance Program Administrator for the Arizona Department of Corrections, hosted a discussion on Compassion Fatigue


FAQs

How can I order OVC publications and products?
Many OVC publications and products are available in hardcopy and can be ordered from the National Cr... Read More

Back to Top


Funding

No funding records found relevant to this topic.

Back to Top


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National Calendar of Crime Victim Assistance-Related Events
Upcoming Event(s)
National Congress of American Indians Mid-Year Conference & Tradeshow
Anchorage, AK
06/08/2014-06/11/2014

28th Annual Conference of Parents Of Murdered Children, Inc
Rochester, MN
08/14/2014-08/17/2014

40th National Organization for Victim Assistance (NOVA) Conference
Chicago, IL
08/17/2014-08/20/2014

Online Directory of Crime Victims Services.