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LGBTQ

  • Publications (7)
  • Resources (8)
  • Forum Discussions (5)
  • FAQs (1)
  • Funding (0)
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The letters LGBTQ used collectively create an initialism that refers to individuals who identify themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer or questioning. Violence occurs at the same rate in LGBTQ communities as in the heterosexual community. However, for a variety of reasons, LGBTQ victims of crime often do not have consistent access to culturally competent services to help them prevent and recover from violence. Most victim assistance agencies lack outreach to LGBTQ victims, LGBTQ cultural competence training for staff, LGBTQ-specific policies and practices, and collaboration with LGBTQ service providers. As a result, LGBTQ victims suffer disproportionately from violence and its aftereffects.

The following resources are provided to bring greater awareness to the extent of victimization of LGBTQ individuals and communities and the widespread gaps in victim services for LGBTQ victims of crime.


OVC and OVC-Sponsored Publications

Responding to Transgender Victims of Sexual Assault (June 2014) OVC, Electronic Document, 0 pages, NCJ 243903.
Transgender victims of sexual assault, like all crime victims, want and deserve to be respected, heard, believed, served, and supported. This user-friendly guide offers practical tools to promote understanding and support of transgender victims, whether you are a health care provider, law enforcement officer, emergency medical personnel, advocate, therapist, or support group facilitator. Learn how you can be a source of support and care for individuals in this high-risk population.
HTML
 
Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services Final Report (May 2013) OVC, Report, 63 pages, NCJ 239957.
The Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services initiative was launched by OVC in fall 2010 to expand the vision and impact of the crime victim assistance field. This Final Report provides a set of findings and broad recommendations, informed by stakeholder forums and literature reviews, that form a framework for strategic, transformative change. The Final Report outlines ways the field can overcome the obstacles it faces and change how it meets victims' needs and addresses those who perpetrate crime.
Abstract | PDF (Full Report) | PDF (Summary & Recommendations) | PDF (At a Glance Fact Sheet)
 
Outreach to Underserved Teen Victims of Crime (2012) OVC-Sponsored, Grant, 40 pages, NCJ 238800.
The National Crime Prevention Council (NCPC) and the National Center for Victims of Crime (National Center), with funding from OVC, produced this guidebook and accompanying Web-based resources to provide an overview of the challenges faced in conducting outreach to underserved teen victims of crime. The materials highlight examples of the various projects and resources developed and implemented in local communities through the Underserved Teen Victims Initiative.
Abstract | PDF
 
SART Toolkit: Resources for Sexual Assault Response Teams (March 2011) OVC, Electronic Document, 0 pages, NCJ 232786.
This toolkit is a compilation of resources for communities wanting to develop SARTs — coordinated teams of people who serve victims of sexual assault — and for communities wanting to improve their SART responses. The toolkit reviews the basics, lays out the steps involved in putting together your SART, describes how to retain focus on victims, highlights SART programs throughout the country, and includes sample resources to use when developing and evaluating your team.
HTML
 

OJP Publications

Hate Crime Victimization, 2004-2012 - Statistical Tables (February 2014) BJS, BJS Technical Reports, 15 pages, NCJ 244409.
This report presents counts and rates of hate crime victimization in 2012, using data from the National Crime Victimization Survey. The tables show change in the number and rate of hate crime victimizations since 2011 and during the 10-year period since 2003. They examine the perceived motivation for the hate crime, demographic characteristics of victims and offenders, and the percentage of hate crime reported to police.

Part Of the BJS Technical Reports Series Abstract | PDF | TEXT
 
Technology, Teen Dating Violence and Abuse, and Bullying (July 2013) NIJ-Sponsored, Grant, 198 pages, NCJ 243296.
The goal of this project was to expand knowledge about the types of violence and abuse experiences youth have via technology (e.g., social networking sites, texting on cell phones), and how the experience of such cyber abuse within teen dating relationships or through bullying relates to other life factors.
Abstract | PDF
 
Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in New York City, Volume One: The CSEC Population in New York City: Size, Characteristics, and Needs (September 2008) NIJ-Sponsored, Grant, 126 pages, NCJ 225083.
This study presents the methodology and findings of a study that examined the size, characteristics, needs, and geographic spread of commercially sexually exploited children (CSEC) in New York City.
Abstract | PDF
 

Back to Top

The letters LGBTQ used collectively create an initialism that refers to individuals who identify themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer or questioning. Violence occurs at the same rate in LGBTQ communities as in the heterosexual community. However, for a variety of reasons, LGBTQ victims of crime often do not have consistent access to culturally competent services to help them prevent and recover from violence. Most victim assistance agencies lack outreach to LGBTQ victims, LGBTQ cultural competence training for staff, LGBTQ-specific policies and practices, and collaboration with LGBTQ service providers. As a result, LGBTQ victims suffer disproportionately from violence and its aftereffects.

The following resources are provided to bring greater awareness to the extent of victimization of LGBTQ individuals and communities and the widespread gaps in victim services for LGBTQ victims of crime.


The letters LGBTQ used collectively create an initialism that refers to individuals who identify themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer or questioning. Violence occurs at the same rate in LGBTQ communities as in the heterosexual community. However, for a variety of reasons, LGBTQ victims of crime often do not have consistent access to culturally competent services to help them prevent and recover from violence. Most victim assistance agencies lack outreach to LGBTQ victims, LGBTQ cultural competence training for staff, LGBTQ-specific policies and practices, and collaboration with LGBTQ service providers. As a result, LGBTQ victims suffer disproportionately from violence and its aftereffects.

The following resources are provided to bring greater awareness to the extent of victimization of LGBTQ individuals and communities and the widespread gaps in victim services for LGBTQ victims of crime.


Each month the Nation's experts answer your questions about best practices in victim services. Below are upcoming and most recent session discussions in this topic:

On Jun 25 2014 at 2:00PM, michael munson, cofounder and Executive Director of FORGE, and Loree Cook-Daniels, FORGE’s Policy and Program Director, hosted a discussion on Serving Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Sexual Assault Victims

On Jun 5 2013 at 2:00PM, Robin Parker, Executive Director of the Beyond Diversity Resource Center, and Sharon Stapel, Executive Director of the New York City Anti-Violence Project, hosted a discussion on Incorporating LGBTQ Victims’ Needs into Mainstream Victim Services

On Jun 6 2012 at 2:00PM, Michael Munson, cofounder and Executive Director of FORGE, and Rebecca Waggoner, Director of OutFront Minnesota’s Anti-Violence Program, hosted a discussion on Understanding Violence Against Transgender Individuals

On Jun 8 2011 at 2:00PM, Harlan Pruden, Assistant Director of the Empire State Development Corporation's Division of Minority and Women's Business Development, hosted a discussion on Responding to Native LGBT/ Two Spirit Community Crime Victims

On Jun 24 2009 at 2:00PM, Avy Skolnik, hosted a discussion on Working With LGBTIQ Survivors of Violence

The letters LGBTQ used collectively create an initialism that refers to individuals who identify themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer or questioning. Violence occurs at the same rate in LGBTQ communities as in the heterosexual community. However, for a variety of reasons, LGBTQ victims of crime often do not have consistent access to culturally competent services to help them prevent and recover from violence. Most victim assistance agencies lack outreach to LGBTQ victims, LGBTQ cultural competence training for staff, LGBTQ-specific policies and practices, and collaboration with LGBTQ service providers. As a result, LGBTQ victims suffer disproportionately from violence and its aftereffects.

The following resources are provided to bring greater awareness to the extent of victimization of LGBTQ individuals and communities and the widespread gaps in victim services for LGBTQ victims of crime.


What is Vision 21?
The Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services initiative was launched by OVC in fall 2010 to expand th... Read More

More FAQs

The letters LGBTQ used collectively create an initialism that refers to individuals who identify themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer or questioning. Violence occurs at the same rate in LGBTQ communities as in the heterosexual community. However, for a variety of reasons, LGBTQ victims of crime often do not have consistent access to culturally competent services to help them prevent and recover from violence. Most victim assistance agencies lack outreach to LGBTQ victims, LGBTQ cultural competence training for staff, LGBTQ-specific policies and practices, and collaboration with LGBTQ service providers. As a result, LGBTQ victims suffer disproportionately from violence and its aftereffects.

The following resources are provided to bring greater awareness to the extent of victimization of LGBTQ individuals and communities and the widespread gaps in victim services for LGBTQ victims of crime.


No funding records found relevant to this topic.

More Funding Opportunities

The letters LGBTQ used collectively create an initialism that refers to individuals who identify themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer or questioning. Violence occurs at the same rate in LGBTQ communities as in the heterosexual community. However, for a variety of reasons, LGBTQ victims of crime often do not have consistent access to culturally competent services to help them prevent and recover from violence. Most victim assistance agencies lack outreach to LGBTQ victims, LGBTQ cultural competence training for staff, LGBTQ-specific policies and practices, and collaboration with LGBTQ service providers. As a result, LGBTQ victims suffer disproportionately from violence and its aftereffects.

The following resources are provided to bring greater awareness to the extent of victimization of LGBTQ individuals and communities and the widespread gaps in victim services for LGBTQ victims of crime.


Publications

OVC and OVC-Sponsored Publications

Responding to Transgender Victims of Sexual Assault (June 2014) OVC, Electronic Document, 0 pages, NCJ 243903. Transgender victims of sexual assault, like all crime victims, want and deserve to be respected, heard, believed, served, and supported. This user-friendly guide offers practical tools to promote understanding and support of transgender victims, whether you are a health care provider, law enforcement officer, emergency medical personnel, advocate, therapist, or support group facilitator. Learn how you can be a source of support and care for individuals in this high-risk population.
HTML
 
Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services Final Report (May 2013) OVC, Report, 63 pages, NCJ 239957. The Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services initiative was launched by OVC in fall 2010 to expand the vision and impact of the crime victim assistance field. This Final Report provides a set of findings and broad recommendations, informed by stakeholder forums and literature reviews, that form a framework for strategic, transformative change. The Final Report outlines ways the field can overcome the obstacles it faces and change how it meets victims' needs and addresses those who perpetrate crime.
Abstract | PDF (Full Report) | PDF (Summary & Recommendations) | PDF (At a Glance Fact Sheet)
 
Outreach to Underserved Teen Victims of Crime (2012) OVC-Sponsored, Grant, 40 pages, NCJ 238800. The National Crime Prevention Council (NCPC) and the National Center for Victims of Crime (National Center), with funding from OVC, produced this guidebook and accompanying Web-based resources to provide an overview of the challenges faced in conducting outreach to underserved teen victims of crime. The materials highlight examples of the various projects and resources developed and implemented in local communities through the Underserved Teen Victims Initiative.
Abstract | PDF
 
SART Toolkit: Resources for Sexual Assault Response Teams (March 2011) OVC, Electronic Document, 0 pages, NCJ 232786. This toolkit is a compilation of resources for communities wanting to develop SARTs — coordinated teams of people who serve victims of sexual assault — and for communities wanting to improve their SART responses. The toolkit reviews the basics, lays out the steps involved in putting together your SART, describes how to retain focus on victims, highlights SART programs throughout the country, and includes sample resources to use when developing and evaluating your team.
HTML
 

OJP Publications

Hate Crime Victimization, 2004-2012 - Statistical Tables (February 2014) BJS, BJS Technical Reports, 15 pages, NCJ 244409. This report presents counts and rates of hate crime victimization in 2012, using data from the National Crime Victimization Survey. The tables show change in the number and rate of hate crime victimizations since 2011 and during the 10-year period since 2003. They examine the perceived motivation for the hate crime, demographic characteristics of victims and offenders, and the percentage of hate crime reported to police.
Part Of the BJS Technical Reports Series
Abstract | PDF | TEXT
 
Technology, Teen Dating Violence and Abuse, and Bullying (July 2013) NIJ-Sponsored, Grant, 198 pages, NCJ 243296. The goal of this project was to expand knowledge about the types of violence and abuse experiences youth have via technology (e.g., social networking sites, texting on cell phones), and how the experience of such cyber abuse within teen dating relationships or through bullying relates to other life factors.
Abstract | PDF
 
Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children in New York City, Volume One: The CSEC Population in New York City: Size, Characteristics, and Needs (September 2008) NIJ-Sponsored, Grant, 126 pages, NCJ 225083. This study presents the methodology and findings of a study that examined the size, characteristics, needs, and geographic spread of commercially sexually exploited children (CSEC) in New York City.
Abstract | PDF
 

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Related Resources

OVC Funded Resources

FORGE
FORGE is a progressive organization whose mission is to support, educate and advocate for the rights and lives of transgender individuals and SOFFAs (Significant Others, Friends, Family, and Allies).
 

Federal Resources

National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS)
Sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs, NCJRS offers information on victimology and victim assistance, criminal justice, juvenile justice, information to support research, policy, and program development worldwide. NCJRS supplies the victim services field with resources, publications, and program information. The NCJRS library collection includes more than 30,000 resources relevant to the field.
 
StopBullying.gov
This Web site, managed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, provides information about how to prevent and address bullying in schools.
 

Non-Governmental Resources

Community United Against Violence (CUAV)
CUAV offers violence prevention services (particularly for hate and domestic violence) to the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities.
 
Gay Men's Domestic Violence Project
The Gay Men’s Domestic Violence Project supports victims and survivors through education, advocacy and direct services.
 
LAMBDA GLBT Community Services
LAMBDA is dedicated to protecting gays and lesbians from discrimination and violence in homes, businesses, and schools through educational campaigns, nondiscrimination leadership, and antiviolence efforts.
 
National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP)
NCAVP addresses the pervasive problem of violence committed against and within the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) and HIV-affected communities.
 
Safe Schools Coalition
The Safe Schools Coalition is an international public-private partnership in support of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender youth, that is working to help schools become safe places where every family can belong, where every educator can teach, and where every child can learn, regardless of gender identity or sexual orientation.
 

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Web Forum Discussions

Each month the Nation's experts answer your questions about best practices in victim services. Below are upcoming and most recent session discussions in this topic:

On Jun 25 2014 at 2:00PM, michael munson, cofounder and Executive Director of FORGE, and Loree Cook-Daniels, FORGE’s Policy and Program Director, hosted a discussion on Serving Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Sexual Assault Victims

On Jun 5 2013 at 2:00PM, Robin Parker, Executive Director of the Beyond Diversity Resource Center, and Sharon Stapel, Executive Director of the New York City Anti-Violence Project, hosted a discussion on Incorporating LGBTQ Victims’ Needs into Mainstream Victim Services

On Jun 6 2012 at 2:00PM, Michael Munson, cofounder and Executive Director of FORGE, and Rebecca Waggoner, Director of OutFront Minnesota’s Anti-Violence Program, hosted a discussion on Understanding Violence Against Transgender Individuals

On Jun 8 2011 at 2:00PM, Harlan Pruden, Assistant Director of the Empire State Development Corporation's Division of Minority and Women's Business Development, hosted a discussion on Responding to Native LGBT/ Two Spirit Community Crime Victims

On Jun 24 2009 at 2:00PM, Avy Skolnik, hosted a discussion on Working With LGBTIQ Survivors of Violence


FAQs

What is Vision 21?
The Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services initiative was launched by OVC in fall 2010 to expand th... Read More

Back to Top


Funding

No funding records found relevant to this topic.

Back to Top


EventsDirectoryE-Mail UpdatesRSS
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National Calendar of Crime Victim Assistance-Related Events
Upcoming Event(s)
FBI National Academy Associates National Training Conference and Law Enforcement Expo
Philadelphia, PA
07/26/2014-07/29/2014

28th Annual Conference of Parents Of Murdered Children, Inc. (POMC)
Rochester, MN
08/14/2014-08/17/2014

14th National Indian Nations Conference: Justice for Victims of Crime
Palm Springs, CA
12/11/2014-12/14/2014

Online Directory of Crime Victims Services.