Making the Most of National Crime Victims' Rights Week
Steve Derene, Mary Gleason Rappaport, Anne Seymour  -  2012/3/7
http://ovc.ncjrs.gov/ovcproviderforum
 
 
how do you create an event that will draw the community to attend? Often our events are well attended by folks already familiar with victim services and rights. We want to include a more diverse group from our community.
 
1.  Mary Rappaport
 Jen, Every year, we review the activities that have been conducted across the country and I am ALWAYS amazed and inspire by the ingenuity and freshness of activities that communities are conducting. Have you tried working with your local high school or a youth group for your event? What about local faith communities? Have you looked at the list of special event ideas in the NCVRW Resource Guide at http://ovc.ncjrs.gov/ncvrw2012/pdf/MaximizingCommunication.pdf. I'd be happy to work with you offline to do some brainstorming...just let me know.
 
2.  Steve Derene
 Jen, take a look at the descriptions of the previous NCVRW Community Awareness Projects at http://cap.navaa.org -- click on previous recipients -- and look at the descriptions of their activities. There are lots of great, creative and innovative ideas there.
 
3.  Jen
 Mary, in regards to your comment about doing something different or fun, can you elaborate on that? I have benn doing this for a while and am at a loss for some fresh ideas
 
4.  Mary Rappaport
 Part 2:Or, you might engage a group of local teenagers to volunteer at your event and they will invite their friends. Partner with other groups from your local business, social services, healthcare communities to hold your event; such a collaboration will automatically broaden the reach of your efforts and generate a bigger attendance. For more special event ideas, check out the 2012 NCVRW Resource Guide, Section 2: Maximizing Communication and Awareness, at http://ovc.ncjrs.gov/ncvrw2012/pdf/MaximizingCommunication.pdf. Also, dont forget to send media advisories announcing your event to the local media. Lots of terrific media ideas can be found in the 2012 NCVRW Resource Guide, Section 4: Working with the Media at http://ovc.ncjrs.gov/ncvrw2012/pdf/WorkingWithTheMedia.pdf And, good luck! Mary
 
5.  Steve Derene
 To paraphrase Willie Sutton, Go where the people are. Look at our CAP TIPS at http://cap.navaa.org/captips.html, especially the 2007 CAP TIP - How to Turn Out a Crowd. Examples from NCVRW CAP projects: a non-profit in San Jose is collaborating with a food truck company to bring unique foods during lunchtime to a newly opened market area in downtown San Jose. Crime victims/survivors and public officials will speak at the event and local agencies will distribute information about victim rights and services. A Missouri agency will hold a public awareness event at a high pedestrian traffic area in downtown Kansas City during lunchtime at which victims will speak, an award for outstanding work protecting children will be presented, and local agencies will staff resource tables.
 
6.  Mary Rappaport
 Part 1:Betsy, First let me say that your question points to a concern shared by many organizations: how to get the public to show up to our event? Theres no simple answer to this question, because there are many variables from community to community. The one constant, however, is that there is so much competing for the publics attention and time. So, youll need to offer something new, interesting, novel, even fun (maybe a 5K runwalk?). What about inviting a local or state elected official who has supported victimization issues? Ask a local TV anchor to host your event. Incorporate a presentation by a victim-turned-advocate, someone whose story may have received a lot of media attention.
 
7.  anne
 THANKS TO EVERYONE FOR JOINING THIS SESSION! You can identify gatekeepers from the diverse communities you want to engage, and ask them to help spread the word. In the past, weve worked with leaders of multi-faith communities to include information about NCVRW events in church/synagogue/mosque/temple bulletins. It also helps to have activities for families and kids face painting, poster contest, balloons imprinted with the NCVRW theme as free events for families always draw a crowd.
 
 
What are the most critical and relevant NCVRW talking points to consider in order to educate and inspire a listening audience?
 
1.  anne
 ALSO, talk WITH people, not AT them In your presentations, ask questions, get folks talking to each other, practice Adult Learning Theory (you can access OVC's Ultimate Trainer at www.ovcttac.org for more info)
 
2.  Mary Rappaport
 Part 2:This years NCVRW theme video (mailed with the hard copy of the NCVRW Resource Guide) is a great tool to open up any special event you may be holding. The video includes a number of compelling talking points that you may want to use and effectively underscores why its so important for the victim services community (and others) to extend the vision by striving to reach every victim.To see a snippet of the video, visit http://ovc.ncjrs.gov/ncvrw2012/index.html. The Sample News Release found on page 4 of Section 4: Working with the Media of the 2012 NCVRW Resource also provides a suggestion of high-level talking points that support this years theme. Find at http://ovc.ncjrs.gov/ncvrw2012/pdf/WorkingWithTheMedia.pdf.
 
3.  Mary Rappaport
 Part 1:Jill, I would say that the key message for 2012 is set out in the NCVRW theme: Extending the Vision: Reaching Every Victim. This theme celebrates the progress of the victim rights movement and underscores the need to address crimes that have emerged and proliferated as a result of new technologies, globalization, and changing demographics. It also calls for a renewed commitment to address long-standing types of victimization.I think one of the most compelling ways to educate and inspire an audience is through stories about the personal impact of victimization. Think about inviting one of these new victims (of trafficking, ID theft, LGBTQ victimization, etc.) to speak at your event.
 
4.  anne
 GREAT QUESTION! I always emphasize survivors and victims rights and the availability of services because everyone IS or KNOWS a victim of crime. With the 2012 theme, I think reaching EVERY victim is also critical, including those that dont report crimes, and those within traditionally under-served populations (i.e., elderly, victims with disabilities, LEP victims, etc.). Also, brag a bit about YOUR program, the value you provide to survivors and community safety, how folks can volunteer and, if you are an NGO, how folks can donate to your cause. Leave folks with 3 things YOU can do to extend a positive vision for victims and our community This is a GREAT opportunity to proactively engage your community!
 
 
What's the best form of social media to get the word out about our local NCVRW events? We have a Facebook account, but not too many followers.
 
1.  Mary Rappaport
 It can take a while to build a social media community. You need to publicize your Facebook account through your website (if you have one) and through any regular business emails that you and other colleagues send out. I am aware of quite a few communities who have successfully used their Facebook account to promote NCVRW events.
 
2.  Anne
 With your Facebook account, have a contest for volunteers and staff to seek the most friends and likes for your page. If everyone got 20 new friends, you'd have a fan club!
 
3.  anne
 I have fallen in LOVE with Flickr, where you can place posters, graphics, photos with brief messages. It's also easy to post YouTube videos (if you go to www.youtube.com and enter National Crime Victims' Rights Week into its search engine, you'll see lots of examples. Finally, use your email! At the bottom of each outgoing email, imbed information about your NCVRW events and the theme.
 
 
We hope some of the local churches will participate in our coalition's event. What's the best way to extend the invitation?
 
1.  Mary Rappaport
 Including your local faith communities is a wonderful idea. Many churches and synagogues issue weekly newsletters to their congregations. Contact the newsletter editor and ask to list an announcement about your event. If you contact church leadership, you may also be able to arrange a special presentation about your event.
 
2.  anne
 It's time-consuming, but personal meetings with spiritual leaders are important. Many multi-faith communities have programs that help victims, i.e. domestic violence support groups, so visit their websites and match what you are doing to their current programs and needs. ALSO ask them to hang posters in their lobbies and include information about your efforts in their Bulletin. And if you can get a faith leader to plug victims' rights and services in their sermons, YAY!
 
3.  Steve Derene
 Check out the CAP TIP from 2007 about Engaging Multi-Faith Communities at http://cap.navaa.org, click on CAP TIPS.
 
 
Are there any copyright restrictions on the artwork in the Resource Guide?
 
1.  Mary Rappaport
 In fact, most of the artwork is designed so you may add your organization's logo and contact information directly onto the artwork. If you need instructions, visit Section : Resource Guide Artwork at http://ovc.ncjrs.gov/ncvrw2012/pdfA/rtwork.pdf.
 
2.  Mary Rappaport
 NO. You are free to use any and all of the Resource Guide artwork without regard to copyright infringement. In fact, we encourage you to!
 
 
What is the symbolism of the spiral in the theme poster?
 
1.  Mary Rappaport
 The spiral is a stylized illustration of the Vision and idea of Reaching that the theme underscores. The graphic designer attempted to depict the meaning of the theme in a very uplifting, inspiring fashion.
 
 
When is the Awards ceremony?
 
1.  Steve Derene
 Remember to register to attend the OVC Awards Ceremony by going to http://www.ncvrw.org
 
2.  anne
 The OVC Awards Ceremony is Friday, April 20 at 2 pm. The US Congressional Victims' Rights Caucus Awards Ceremony is Thursday, April 19 at 10 am. If you send a BLANK email to MondayMissives-subscribe@yahoogroups.com, you can join my free listserv, which contains this info AND lots of resources about victim assistance we send out each Monday.
 
3.  Steve Derene
 The OVC Awards Ceremony will be Friday, April 20 at 2:00 pm Eastern Time at the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium, 1301 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC
 
 
i'm interested in the community awareness projects. how do we find out if an organization in our area has received funding? we'd love to partner with them!
 
1.  Steve Derene
 A list of previous recipients of the Community Awareness Projects are posted at http://cap.navaa.org and click on Previous Recipients. That list includes the 2012 projects.
 
2.  anne
 Even if allied organizations have NOT received CAP funding, it's a good idea to partner with them. Working together always results in bigger and better events. And remember April is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, Child Abuse Prevention Month, and Volunteer Recognition Month, so PLENTY of allied issues to also partner on!!!
 
 
Any ideas for innovative NCVRW events for federal criminal justice agencies? Perhaps something that could function as a training and fun event?
 
1.  Steve Derene
 It's a great idea to involve federal agencies in NCVRW activities. And, remember, that all the money that goes into the Crime Victims Fund for VOCA grants comes from the work of federal agencies, so NCVRW is a great opportunity to thank the U.S. Attorneys, FBI and other federal agencies for the work they do that helps support victim services.
 
2.  Mary Rappaport
 I encourage you to review Section 2: Maximizing Communication and Awareness of the 2012 NCVRW Resource Guide, which includes many special event ideas. Visit at http://ovc.ncjrs.gov/ncvrw2012/pdf/MaximizingCommunication.pdf.
 
3.  anne
 EXCELLENT question! I think it's vital to publicize the fact that U.S. Attorneys collect the fees and fines that contribute to the Victims of Crime Act Fund - we just can't thank them and recognize their efforts enough! ALSO, you can have an E-Jeopardy type game where folks can play and respond to themes like Alphabet Soup (all those federal acronyms); federal laws (VOCA, VAWA, etc.); matching missions of victim-serving Federal agencies to the actual agencies, etc.
 
 
Any suggestions on activities that would work with juvenile offenders?
 
1.  anne
 It's really helpful to partner with juvenile justice agencies, and have their youthful offenders with community service hours help you prepare for NCVRW -- affixing theme pins to cards; putting posters up around town; folding brochures, etc. You can also arrange for a Victim Impact Panel to teach them about how crime hurts people, and a bit about offender accountability. Check out the Impact of Crime on Victims curriculum from OVC at www.ovcttac.org; it features 10 modules addressing different types of crime, with workbooks that are written at the sixth grade level. THANKS for considering juvenile offenders, this is rewarding work to care about them!!
 
2.  Mary Rappaport
 Do check out Section 2 of the NCVRW Resource Guide, which includes an entire section on possible events for youth...I think many would work with juvenile offenders...for more information, visit http://ovc.ncjrs.gov/ncvrw2012/pdf/MaximizingCommunication.pdf.
 
 
What's the best strategy for convincing local television stations to play the theme video (or pieces of it)?
 
1.  anne
 Excellent question! Starting NOW, ask your volunteers to watch different evening news stations for the next two weeks, and document ANYALL stories related to crime and victimization. Then in your pitch to these stations, compliment their wonderful reporting on victim issues, and tell them about the video and how it relates to WHAT THEY ARE COVERING.
 
 
Do you have any information about the grants that have been awarded for NCVRW activities?
 
1.  anne
 Consider asking folks in your community to help with your events. For example, a printer can imprint your information on grocery bags donated by grocery stores; frame shops can contribute framing for your awards, etc. If you don't ask, you don't receive!
 
2.  Steve Derene
 A list of all projects that have received NCVRW Community Awareness Projects along with a description of their activities are posted on the website at http://cap.navaa.org, click on Previous Recipients.
 
 
Forgot to ask my other question ... How do we get the bullying poster into our schools? I love it!
 
1.  Mary Rappaport
 I'm so pleased you like the bullying poster. I suggest you email the PDF of the poster to all of your local schools (try to find out the head of Counseling Dept...usually found online)and ask them to print it out and post it throughout the school campus. Remember to add your agency's local information if you have resources you can provide.
 
2.  anne
 Find some kids who attend the school, and their parents, and have them make the pitch. ALSO offer to conduct a school assembly or class on bullying, prevention, victim assistance, etc. There are so many great resources on the Internet on bullying, and this matches the reaching every victim part of our theme!
 
 
I didn't know there was funding available. How do I know for next year's NCVRW?
 
1.  Steve Derene
 The announcement usually comes out October and you can check the NCVRW CAP website at http://cap.navaa.org. We will soon have a email list for announcements, so you can sign up at the website to be put on a mailing list for announcements. Check back there in a few days.
 
2.  anne
 Billy and everyone, please join my FREE weekly listserv, which provides weekly updates on latest research, funding opportunities, promising practices, trends in our field,etc. To join, send a BLANK email to MondayMissives-subscribe@yahoogroups.com, and you are in! I think you'll find the info we put out VERY helpful to your NCVRW and wonderful year-round efforts to assist victims and survivors of crime!
 
 
We have a small print budget, but really want to do something more than print the posters on our office printers. What's the biggest bang for our buck?
 
1.  Mary Rappaport
 I suggest you put together an email list of community agencies, schools, media, business groups, law enforcement agencies (etc.) and prepare a really nice email announcing the availability of new posters. Then, attache PDFs of the posters so the agencies can print them out and post them in public places. Only cost to you is your time!
 
2.  anne
 First and foremost, see if a local or chain printer will donate printing services or provide at a reduced cost. I LOVE communities that do table tents or placemats for restaurants (if you can include a kids' game like crossword puzzle, all the better!) Check out www.puzzlemaker.com for free, easy games you can develop. ALSO the bookmarks are great for libraries and bookstores. AND if you can imprint balloons (preferably the non-toxic kind) and blow them up for kids, it's always popular!
 
 
How can we help get the word out about the Spanish version of the Resource Guide? What a great resource this year!
 
1.  Paige
 In our judicial circuit, the priest at the local catholic church is usually a good place to start
 
2.  Mary Rappaport
 Julie, see if you can find an Hispanic leader in your community (from the media, faith, business community) and ask that person to meet with you about Latino crime victims. I would imagine he or she would have LOTS of ideas about how to reach out to the Hispanic community.
 
3.  anne
 Yes, use any online search engine and type in latino organizations or hispanic organizations , comma, (name of your city). Visit their websites and match THEIR interests to yours, i.e., working with kids, outreach to women, etc. Then being well-prepared, contact the group's leaders to engage them in your activities. AGAIN, make it about THEM! Never fails...........
 
4.  Julie
 Any help on how to reach out to the Latino population?
 
5.  anne
 Pregunta bueno! I would develop a PSA in Spanish for your local Spanish-speaking TV and radio stations, and provide a URL link to the Spanish version of the kit. It's a great resource for their audiences,and they should be happy to publicize it!
 
6.  Mary Rappaport
 Yes, the Office for Victims of Crime made a huge commitment to ensure that this year's Resource Guide is available entirely in Spanish. I will recommend to OVC that additional promotional emails (and listservs of National victim assistance organizations) be sent out to the field. GREAT IDEA!!!
 
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