Responding to Missing Children in Indian Country
Nadja Jones  -  2011/5/10
http://ovc.ncjrs.gov/ovcproviderforum
 
 
Can you tell me how many tribes have amber alert programs? How can my community get an amber alert program?
 
1.  Phil Keith
 Any federally recognized tribe can request technical assistance to start and AMBER Alert Program or receive training on missing, endangered, abducted and exploited children by contacting askamber@fvtc.edu
 
2.  Preston
 You can also find comprehensive numbers and lists of AA plan from the reports on this page: http://www.amberalert.gov/statistics.htm
 
3.  Phil Keith
 There are approximately 32 tribes with AMBER Alert Programs. Although not all are fully implemented, considerable progress is being made in all 32 tribes.
 
4.  Nadja Jones
 The number of tribal law enforcement and media outlets that collaborate for Amber Alerts can be found by contacting Please contact Office of Justice Programs SMART Office U.S. Department of Justice 810 Seventh Street, NW Suite 8241 Washington, DC 20531 Phone: (202) 616-6459
 
 
Are there tribal communities that believe their children were enticed or coerced to leave their communities by someone they communicated with online or on a social networking site?
 
1.  Diane Payne
 Sex trafficking of Native children is more common than many of us working in the criminal child sexual abuse response had known until quite recently. Children are enticed away from their homes via internet chat, and sometimes enticed into meeting predators when they are visiting the city for Tribal events with their families. The Minnesota Indian Women's Resource Center has a report called Shattered Hearts which describes some of this, but we are just beginning to see the depth of this problem I think.
 
2.  Nadja Jones
 The National Congress of American Indians is a wonderful resource to download testimony on keeping our children safe, and to learn what tribes responses have been specific to technology predators. NCAI.org There is also a media kit available from the DOJ and the Project Safe Childhood workgroup on this topic. Please contact: Correspondence to the Department of Justice, Project Safe Childhood, may be sent to: Office of Justice Programs Office of Justice Programs Office of the Assistant Attorney General 810 Seventh Street, NW Washington, D.C. 20531 Attn: Project Safe Childhood By E-Mail E-mail to the Department may be sent to AskDOJ@usdoj.gov
 
 
Can you give some examplets of how Tribes - States - federal agencies coordinate successfully on child-custody related (parental) abductions of Native children in PL 280 states where state (not the tribe or federal agency) has criminal jurisdiction? What can a tribe do to improve the response of state law enforcement to a parental abduction from the village into the city.
 
1.  Nadja Jones
 FYI on 280 states and tribes. Public Law 83-280 (commonly referred to as Public Law 280 or PL 280) was a transfer of legal authority (jurisdiction) from the federal government to state governments which significantly changed the division of legal authority among tribal, federal, and state governments. Congress gave six states (five states initially - California, Minnesota, Nebraska, Oregon, and Wisconsin; and then Alaska upon statehood) extensive criminal and civil jurisdiction over tribal lands within the affected states (the so-called mandatory states). Public Law 280 also permitted the other states to acquire jurisdiction at their option.
 
2.  Nadja Jones
 The experience of NICWA is one of relationships being built over time to improve outcomes for children. The use of intergovernmental agreements is key to building a network of responders to child abduction. NICWA processes these requests on a case by case basis always with the recommendation to learn and follow that tribes policy and code. Identifying the tribe and accessing the code for that tribe are key activities. NCAI has a great tribal contact list for more information. They can be reached at: http://www.ncai.org/Tribal-Directory.3.0.html The list is organized by state, region, federally recognized, state recognized, and officials of tribal government.
 
 
I work for a large metropolitan police department which has over 1,000 missing juvenile cases reported each year. While our city does not have an Indian reservation or lands within our city, we have had several parents report their children missing with us as they end up visiting our city. Question: Other than the standard services we provides any reporting party of a missing juvenile, are there any other resources - specific to American Indian, that I should be aware of as an investigator?
 
1.  Phil Keith
 OJJDP, via Fox Valley Technical College provides free training and technical assistance to address this issue. Contact askamber@fvtc.edu
 
2.  Nadja Jones
 Street Outreach provides street-based services to homeless, runaway and at-risk youth. Street Outreach provides information on safe housing and other services for youth, basic needs resources and health related items. They also provide health and personal care supplies, food and access to transportation. Outreach workers are found in a wide variety of Twin Cities neighborhoods during the week. In 2010, approximately 1175 street outreach contacts were made.Please contact Chris Lawler at chris.lawler@aindahyung.com or 651.632.8923 for questions. Street Outreach staff phone numbers: 651.271.5315 or 612.805.8509.If Ain Dah Yung Street Outreach Workers are unavailable you may contact Streetworks Outreach Collaborative at 612.252.9054
 
3.  Nadja Jones
 Part 1 of 2 The best practices used by metro areas is working with AI youth are two fold. Keeping in mind the Indian Child Welfare Act, there are youth that may have run from a foster care or group home that is compliant with ICWA. The childs tribe needs to be notified and the tribal family services are contacted. The guide to how to by ICWA compliant can be found at: Nicwa.org under the family resources tab.
 
4.  Josie Halfhide
 My question is pertaining to how a Native Urban Organization can improve federal request for applicatiion language to access funding for Native children,youth and families to prevent such problems in urban rural, off reservation communites?
 
 
Question 2: Are there any other resources that I can provide the parents/care giver of a missing juvenile that is specific to American Indians?
 
1.  Nadja Jones
 part 3 of 3 American Indian Education Training and Employment Center (California Bay Area)405-810-9202 Dallas Intertribal Center 214-941-1050 Seattle Indian Center 206-329-8700 website: www.seattleindiancenter.com American Indian Community Center 509-535-0886
 
2.  Nadja Jones
 part 2 of 3 Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc 2956 Ashmun StreetSault Ste. Marie, MI 49783 Phone: 906.632.6896 Fax: 906-632-1810 906-635-4212 Toll Free: 1-800-562-4957 1-877-482-3601 Website: www.itcmi.org North American Indian association of Detroit 313-535-2966 Minneapolis American Indian Center 816-421-7608 e-mail: haicindian@aol.com Las Vegas Indian Center 702-647-5842 Cumberland County Association for Indian People 910-483-8442Native American Resource Center 918-592-1113
 
3.  Nadja Jones
 Part 1 of 3 There is a network of urban Indian programs for the largest segments of our tribal populations. I urge parents to contact these centers as youth that are missing do walk up and ask for services. TUCSON INDIAN CENTER 520-884-7131 97 East Congress Tucson, AZ 85701 Mailing address: P.O. Box 23307, Tucson, AZ 85702 e-mail: jbernal@ticenter.org PHOENIX INDIAN CENTER www.phxindcenter.org 4520 North Central Avenue, Suite 250 Phoenix, Arizona 85012 Telephone: (602) 264-6768 Fax: (602) 263-7822 Email:info@phxindcenter.org North American Indian Center of Boston www.bostonindiancenter.org 105 South Huntington Avenue Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 Phone: (617) 232-0343 FAX: (617) 232-3863 Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan, Inc 2956 Ashmun Street Sault Ste. Marie, MI 49783 Phone: 906.632.6896 Fax: 906-632-1810
 
 
Are there any law enforcement training programs that discuss issues specifically surrounding cases involving missing children from Indian lands.
 
1.  Phil Keith
 OJJDP, via Fox Valley Technical College provides assistance, especially to endangered runaway and missing children from tribal communities. In the Phoenix area, a high risk runaway program has 9 tribal communities and agencies in the greater Phoenix area working together to recover child from tribal communities. This effort includes tribal youth recruited or lured off the reservations for commerical sexual exploitation. For more information contact askamber@fvtc.edu
 
2.  Diane Payne
 We are also working in this arena, especially with child sexual abuse and exploitation and multi-disciplinary team training and development. see http://justice.aksummit.com for more information.
 
3.  Phil Keith
 Yes, there are a number of training programs provided by OJJDP, via Fox Valley Technical College to tribal communities on a wide range of child protetion issues, including abuse, trafficking, abductions, missing, endangered, as well as exploited. Contact askamber@fvtc.edu with any questions or inquiries. Also visit the AMBER website.
 
4.  Nadja Jones
 Please contact your local BIA regional leader for that specific information on training of tribal law enforcement. You can contact them at: Bureau of Indian Affairs Office of Justice Services MS-4551-MIB1849 C Street, N.W.Washington, D.C. 20240 Telephone: (202) 208-5787 Telefax: (202) 208-6170 Email:Questions or Comments on Law Enforcement in Generalojs.lawenforcement@bia.gov
 
 
Other than NCIC, state, and local missing juvenile databases, are there any specific national Indian land LE databases used to log LE information regarding missing juveniles from all Indian lands across the United States. If so, whom would I make contact with to have a search made of these databases for names of persons of interest that may be living on different reservations around the country. This would be helpful if I did not know which tribe these persons were with, not alone what state they lived in.
 
1.  Nadja Jones
 part 2 of 2 Also, being able to understand how Indian country is organized by the BIA is crucial to reaching out to the correct area office. Here is a link that opens to a map and includes the areas covered by the 12 BIA regional area offices. Its not the same as the ACF map. http://www.bia.gov/idc/groups/public/documents/text/idc013422.pdf
 
2.  Nadja Jones
 Part 1 of 2 That a great question and a great project to start up a conversation with the regional BIA leadership. Here is how to contact them for your specific area or landbase. There is a tribal leaders directory available from the Bureau of Indian Affairs in Washington, DC. Please contact :A copy of the Microsoft Access 2003 database file or Adobe Acrobat file can be obtained by regular mail or e-mail. Specify the file format you needand provide a mailing address to Amanda Begay.This directory is posted on the Bureau of Indian Affairs website. Go to the internet address below, under Frequently Requested Documents.http://www.bia.gov/DocumentLibrary/index.htm SPRING 2011 Phone: (202) 513-7640 Fax: (202) 208-5113 E-mail: Amanda.Begay@BIA.gov
 
3.  Phil Keith
 If the tribal law enforcement agency has NCIC, Nlets is also available, as well as the Indian Intelligence Network for communicating sensitive information or seeking assistance.
 
 
Is there a specific person or entity who is considered a national LE expert, or any person who has developed a large amount of knowledge when it comes to cases involving juveniles missing from Indian lands. This would me a great asset to have in LE when additional information may be needed in these cases?
 
1.  Phil Keith
 OJJDP, via Fox Valley Technical College has developed a cadre of subject matter experts for responding to missing children in Indian Country. OJJDP provides a variety of training programs through FVTC to address many issues of missing, inclusive of endangered runaways lured to major metropolitan areas.
 
2.  Nadja Jones
 NICWA has identified Michael Guilfoyle as a leading expert on the knowledge needed to serve missing tribal youth issues nationally. He serves as an advisory partner for Tribal Youth Justice and can be reached through CAMPAIGN FOR YOUTH JUSTICE 1012 14th Street, NW, Suite 610 Washington, DC 20005 202.558.3580202.386.9807 (Fax)info@cfyj.org
 
 
Are there any written LE guides written on the handling of juveniles missing on Indian land for future reference?
 
1.  Phil Keith
 OJJDP, via Fox Valley Technical College provides a wide range of best practices and policy guidelines to tribal communities and based on the type of law enforcement service will provide assistance in development of policies, practices and provide training. Just contact askamber@fvtc.edu
 
2.  Nadja Jones
 Please contact the Native American Rights Fund (narf.org). They have a searchable database. In searching for key terms tribal, code, and youth, there are 1000s of hits and dozens of copies of tribal code specific to how a tribe can respond to your inquiry for handling juveniles missing on tribal land. Use the powerful ISYS search engine to search the entire Native American Rights Fund site or parts of it. We welcome your comments and suggestions as we continue to customize this search engine for our site. Send Emails to dselden@narf.org Thanks to ISYS Search Software for donating the ISYS:web software to the Native American Rights Fund. Note: To search items in the Library's collection, use the online catalog at http://nillcat.narf.org
 
 
Two questions: 1. If a juvenile who is not an American Indian goes missing on Indian land, generally who would be responsible for the investigation. 2. If an American Indian went missing outside of Indian land, in Calif, generally speaking, the law enforcement agency which has jurisdiction over the missing juvenile’s last permanent residence would have final investigative responsibility over the case, after the initial law enforcement agency has exhausted all initial leads.
 
1.  Nadja Jones
 We strongly urge you to contact the tribal law enforcement and tribal court for the identification of a youth who is not a tribal member. It is our experience with tribes that tribal lands are for tribal members and their families. If you are seeking a youth that is not a tribal member, it is always best to collaborate and cooridinate your activity with the tribe.
 
 
Two Questions: 1. Does Indian land LE agencies have similar LE policies and procedures in place when it comes to initial response and follow-up investigation responsibilities. 2. Does each Indian LE agency have its own separate missing juvenile response/follow-up investigation polices like independent law enforcement agencies, or since they have unique LE status, do they share policies and procedures that are the same at other Indian lands around the country?
 
1.  Phil Keith
 OJJDP and Fox Valley Technical College has experience in over 100 tribal communities with law enforcement agencies. Although there are best practice policies available, many agencies develop their own policy and practices. Policy and response protocols vary greatly from one agency to the next. OJJDP recommends via FVTC best practices established by agencies involved in the AMBER Alert Program.
 
2.  Nadja Jones
 Each tribe will have its own formal government and its own policy and code to follow. Tribal LE is an entity that does have resource issues in terms of area to cover and response priorities.It is not best to assume because you know how one tribe's code is regarding juveniles, other tribes will follow suit. It is best to find out from the source every time.
 
3.  Nadja Jones
 Please contact the Native American Rights Fund (narf.org). They have a searchable database. In searching for key terms tribal, code, and youth, there are 1000s of hits and dozens of copies of tribal code specific to how a tribe can respond to your inquiry for handling juveniles missing on tribal land.
 
4.  law enforcement
 You can contact your local FBI field office and they will be able to direct you to the Indian Crimes Unit (they may have a guide) or the Behaviorial Analysis Unit (does have a guide).
 
 
How do parents and/or caretakers report a missing child, and to whom?
 
1.  law enforcement
 When a child goes missing, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) should be contacted and was inadvertently left off of my previous post. NCMEC works closely with NamUs to ensure NamUs is populated with the missing person's information. NCMEC also has many resources in which to help the families of missing children.
 
2.  law enforcement
 Contact your local law enforcement agency and make a report. Enter a record on the missing person into the National Missing and Unidentified Person System (NamUs). If foul play is suspected, request law enforcement enter a record into the Violent Criminal Apprehension Program (ViCAP).Always make sure when you report someone missing, you ask law enforcement, first and foremost, to enter the case into the National Crime Information Center (NCIC).
 
3.  Phil Keith
 Parents should contact their local law enforcement agency immediately upon discovering their child missing. Also, contact the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children via their toll free number to make sure follow up is taking place.
 
4.  Nadja Jones
 part 2 of 2 The law-enforcement agency believes the child is in imminent danger of serious bodily injury or death There is enough descriptive information about the victim and abduction for law enforcement to issue an AMBER Alert to assist in the recovery of the child The childs name and other critical data elements, including the Child Abduction flag, have been entered into the National Crime Information Center (NCIC) computer
 
5.  Nadja Jones
 part 1 of 2 How do AMBER Alerts work?Once law enforcement has been notified about an abducted child, they must first determine if the case meets their AMBER Alert programs criteria. The U.S. Department of Justice recommends the following criteria for issuing an AMBER Alert. Guidance on Criteria for Issuing AMBER Alerts There is reasonable belief by law enforcement an abduction has occurred The abduction is of a child age 17 years or younger The law-enforcement agency believes the child is in imminent danger of serious bodily injury or death more..
 
 
Who responds to a report of a missing child and what is the "normal" response time?
 
1.  Phil Keith
 The agency of jurisdiction will be the responding agency (BIA, tribal or local law enforcement). Reponse times are determine largely by the policy protocol and staffing by the agency. Additionally, if the agency participates in a regional or consolidated communications center, the protocol established will dictate the response time, depending on what priority a missing child call is in the policy.
 
 
What agency investigates the missing child case and is there a search and canvassing component?
 
1.  Nadja Jones
 Often times the tribes family services ICW program will be the first response to search out relatives or fictive kin for more information. The use of the moccasin telegrah is very powerful. The family will trust the tribal family services before the LE often.
 
2.  Phil Keith
 The law enforcement agency with jurisdiction should respond and investigate the missing child case. The single weakest point of most law enforcement agencies is the search and canvassing related to a missing child case. OJJDP, via Fox Valley Technical College provides free training to tribal law enforcement agencies on searches and canvassing best practices.
 
 
How can we help here in Arizona to prevent this pdoblems from spreading.
 
1.  Nadja Jones
 There is also an AMBERT Alert technical assistance event this weekend in AZ. see details at http://www.itcaonline.com/PDF/MarketingຈMaricopa.pdf
 
2.  Phil Keith
 Working in partnership with law enforcement, child protection professionals, educators and others to develop multi-agency responses to missing, endangered, abducted and exploited children is a best practice. Sharing of resources and knowledge on what works and what does not work is very beneficial. OJJDP, via Fox Valley Technical College provides free training and technical assistance for all communities. Contact askamber@fvtc.edu
 
3.  Nadja Jones
 Contacting the Inter tribal Council of Arizona is a good start. Building relationships and knowledge with the 20 tribes represented is a good faith effort to stop the problem from spreading. they can be reached at: http://www.itcaonline.com
 
 
How many executive commmittees and nonprofit organizations are available to support this cause?
 
1.  Nadja Jones
 That is a great question to ask the National Congress of American Indians. They are the leaders in convening tribal leadership and forming committees on issues critical to tribal community health and wellness. They did a remarkable job on meth and Indian country. NCAI.org
 
 
What type of continuing education and training programs (i.e., grant writing and fundraising programs) are available to support this cause?
 
1.  Nadja Jones
 Please contact Lamar Associates, they are a partner with NICWA and are providing free training on issues specific to LE and tribes. Please ask Steve Juneau at info@lamarassociates.net
 
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