Applying for Funding and Managing Grants
Tamara Fulwyler  -  2011/2/10
http://ovc.ncjrs.gov/ovcproviderforum
 
 
i am a part of a new organization our cause is domestic violence i want to open shelters and provide victims a way out what is the first step in obtaining a grant and can i write them myself as i can not afford to pay what people are asking to write grants on our behalf
 
1.  GH:Tamara
 There are some great on-line resources to train your self (and your partners) to develop and write grant proposals. Ive listed them below. In my experience, collaborative proposals are usually stronger than one person writing in isolation. You didnt mention the state you live in. Usually there are state-wide coalitions of DV groups. They sometimes sponsor grant writing workshops such as The Grantsmanship Institute. These are expensive so they often get a coalition grant to fund the training. In the meantime, check out these sites. Resources for Developing Collaborative Project & Grant Proposals1.From the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance, a very good primer on developing and writing grant proposals: http://njms.umdnj.edu/research/orsp/DevelopingAndWritingGrantProposals.htm 2.At grants.gov, a library with full details about applying for federal grants through their main system. It has tips, forms, and tutorials:http://www.grants.gov/applicantsresources.jsp 3.A simple five-step proposal writing process, in plain talk, from the Appalachian Regional Commission: http:www.arc.gov 4.Grant writing tip sheets from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Some information is specific to NIH funding opportunities. However there are excellent coaching ideas and additional links available from this site. http://grants.nih.gov/grants/grant_tips.htm 5.Developing Competitive SAMHSA Grant Applications. The manual was created to help grantees acquire the skills and resources needed to plan, write, and prepare a competitive grant application for SAMHSA funding. http://www.samhsa.gov/Grants/TA/index.aspx
 
 
Please advise about collaborative funding in grant projects: how to arrange; how to present in application including budget; and how to manage?
 
1.  GH:Tamara
 The OJP website is one of the best resources I know to assist in the tasks youre asking about: http:www.ojp.usdoj.govgrants101 Each funding agency usually has a comprehensive guide to help you with managing the grant once its awarded. DOJ offers grant management training to grantees post award. Here is a resource from US DHHS: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/fysb/content/grantsandfunding/managing.htm
 
 
We are a ten-year-old, grass roots, nonprofit whose mission is to find, support and empower family members and friends suffering from a loved one's unsolved murder or long-time, suspicious disappearance. 73% of our budgeted expenses are supported by government funds. Please name several foundations interested in crime victims to whom we might apply for unrestricted funds to support our mission.
 
1.  Howard Morton
 The name of the organization is Families of Homicide Victims and Missing Persons, Inc. www.unresolvedhomicides.org
 
2.  deesha
 What is the name of your organization?
 
3.  GH:Tamara
  The Foundation Center is the best resource Ive seen for finding private funding. http://foundationcenter.org/findfunders If you cannot afford a subscription (which I find usually pays for itself very quickly), it is not uncommon to find a printed directory of this type in your local or regional library reference system. Librarians are great resources for grant writers.The private grants Ive had funded for crime victims services came from corporate partners, such as Target Stores. They have a local giving program where one of their employees recommends an agency for funding. The other funding has been private gifts from local folks who give large annual gifts for tax planning purposes. One of the largest, most consistent donors I had a few years back owned several mortuaries. Where is the private wealth in your community? Who do you know that can help you cultivate relationships with them as potential donors?
 
 
Tamara, as a peer reviewer/applications specialist, what are the 3 most important factors in selecting one non-profit over another for a grant, assuming all are qualified and wrote good submissions?
 
1.  GH:Tamara
 The number one most important factor is follow the instructions. I cannot stress that strongly enough. Then, for me, as a grant reviewer, I want to see a budget that matches the objectives. I see proposals that include activities but no resources in the budget. I specifically want to know if the grant is not going to cover the activity how will it be resourced. I also look at sustainability. A few years ago I attended a training, sponsored by OVC, from which I took away a new perspective on sustainability.SUSTAINABILITY is created when communities/organizations build and maintain adequate resources for providing program services that promote positive social change. It is a multi-dimensional process with four areas of indicators: relationships, building skills, interdependence and commitment. Sustainability is more than continued funding. It means: building infrastructure, including effective governance mechanisms, to increase the human and economic capital of the community. It is developing and maintaining new relationships, building skills, linking resource providers and integrating and evolving services with the existing and changing needs of the community being served. Sometimes it means figuring how to provide a new service through a short-term project or for an indefinite period of time. Other times it might mean merging different, but compatible programs. Sustainability doesnt always mean the project or program will continue intact. For a leader, it means figuring out what you need to know in order to do what you need to do to lead your team in achieving your shared mission.
 
 
What are the most frequent mistakes organizations make in submissions, beyond the basics, such as submitting for a grant you don't qualify for?
 
1.  GH:Tamara
 Over the last ten years Ive written 40 grant proposals and had 34 of them funded for about $7 million. In my experience, the most frequent mistakes are the lack of planning. A collaborative proposal from a diverse group of stakeholders who have a common, community-valued goal has a much higher chance of being funded than a proposal written by one person in one agency. The proposal is strongest when it is based on a well defined logic model, has community input, and is set from the get-go to succeed. Funders want to invest in positive change. The more resources (other than the grant dollars) that are committed to the outcome, the more attractive the investment looks to the funder. Also, sometimes individuals are passionate about a particular cause the political and economic environment might not be in alignment with that cause. Learning about trends in your field can help you target your fund development. A shotgun approach almost never yields a good return on investment of your grant writing time.
 
 
I missed the open enrollment date for one of my grants and we were not selected for funding. Is there anything I can do to have them reconsider accepting my application? We have one full time employee that I will have to layoff if I don't receive this funding.
 
1.  GH:Tamara
 I'm sorry to hear about this difficulty. Depending on the length and status of your relationship with your funder, they might make an exception. Did you try talking with them personally or via phone? Sometimes if you miss the original deadline, if there are unawarded funds left-over, they will re-open applications. Can you write a compelling letter explaining the situation that happened that made you miss the deadline and the loss of critical staffing that will occur as a result? Good luck!
 
 
Can you send me a sample letter of intent?
 
1.  GH:Tamara
 Here is a link to a sample letter of intent for the EPA. http://www.epa.gov/superfund/community/tag/download/loi.htm. The Foundation Center also offers some guidance on writing a letter of intent. Sometimes, I see the format in the full RFP issued by the funding agency. Usually, it is one page. It is addressed to the funder, referenced the name and number (if available of the grant program. It gives notification that the applicant intents to apply. It provides all contact information for the applicant. It asks the funder to notify the application with updates and additional information necessary to support a successful application.
 
 
The Ark. Dept. of Correction is beginning to investigate the establishing of a Victim Offender Dialogue Program. Is there funding and/or grant money available to help us? Is so, where would we begin?
 
1.  D Fortag
 I believe that the TN Dept. of Corrections is currently using such a program. Check out TN.Gov or TN Dept. of Corrections.
 
2.  GH:Tamara
 A good place to start looking for funding might be: http://www.justice.gov/10grants Also a conversation between your agency director and the Arkansas Attorney General might be useful: http://www.arkansasag.gov/crime_safety_crime_victims.html
 
 
What types of product development grants are there for for-profit companies selling surveillance technology? Is there a per unit price limit for police department grant allowances such as the JAG grant or COPS grant?
 
1.  GH:Tamara
 This is a tough one. Most of my experience is with grants for non-profits. In my experience for-profits usually are considered vendors and work under contracts. I got a DOJ OVW grant a few years ago that included the purchase of surveillance equipment for local law enforcement. We were working through a Coordinated Community Response to Family Violence, using a goal of Increasing Victim Safety through Offender Accountability. Law enforcement wanted batterers released into the community electronically monitored until victims could be notified of their release from jail. Police Chiefs, jail staff, prosecutors and victim advocates sat together at table to make a plan to achieve that outcome. It was successfully funded and implemented. So, you might try educating your target users (in nonprofit agencies) aware of your technology so they can write in into their grant budgets.
 
 
Suggestions for small rural agencies? Funding is all but disappearing to keep services in rural communities with low client volume.
 
1.  GH:Tamara
 The crisis in the governments budget is definitely having a negative impact for small rural agencies. During the past five years, what I have seen is an increase in community-based partnerships for providing services to victims of crime. For example, in some rural areas, the crime victims services volunteers are all from partnerships with local churches. Using a formal volunteer plan, church members respond to victims houses to replace locks and secure doorswindows. One agency has a church fax number distribution list. They send out a request for specific donations when a family comes into shelter and needs cash, transportation, or clothing to fill their safety plan. In tight budget times, we may not have dollars to provide services but we can find a variety of community assets through our relationships with local supports. They have access to facilities to hold support groups. Gifts and talents to teach classes or organize fundraising events. Having a strong strategic plan with a clear mission and goals that can be marketed to the local community is a good place to start gathering non-governmental support.
 
 
Please provide ideas and resources for developing unrestricted donations and funds to support ongoing services.
 
1.  GH:Tamara
  One note of caution before we talk about developing unrestricted revenue for nonprofits. If the nonprofit is tax exempt, 501(c)3, the IRS has some specific allowable and unallowable activities they outline in their Publication 598 Tax on Unrelated Business Income of Exempt Organizations (available at http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p598.pdf ). Your director, board and fiscal staff will want to become familiar with these guidelines as they start developing a plan to generate unrestricted revenue. Some successful ventures Ive seen in the past include using clothing donations from the community to open a thrift store that provides vouchers to clients and also sells to the public. Civic groups having annual fundraisers on behalf of the nonprofit such as one Kiwanis Club had a chicken BBQ every summer and the proceeds were dedicated to general cash donation to the domestic violence shelter. One nonprofit set up a payroll deduction for their employees. Each employee could give $1 or more every pay period to an unrestricted operating donation account. The agency used this money for staff development and recognition. Because they were a nonprofit, some of the employees were able to deduct their donation on their itemized tax return schedule. A large nonprofit that I work with has an annual art auction. Over the past ten years they have done a 5050 split saving part of the net proceeds and expending part. The savings added up to $200,000 this year and they started an endowment fund which will be invested. The earnings from the endowment will come back into the organization as unrestricted revenue because thats how their Board of Directors set it up.
 
 
What practices do you suggest to help strengthen and maintain relationships with volunteers and those who donate funds to the agency?
 
1.  GH:Tamara
 Planning and communication are the keys to building and sustaining relationships with volunteers and donors. Have a Board-developed and supported mission and vision. Outline in a strategic plan the priority goals and objectives the agency is working on to fulfill the mission. Share the plan broadly. Build into the plan some benchmarks for evaluating progress. When you have successes, share them with potential donors and volunteers. People want to be a part of a well-functioning group, both as investors and program support workers. The media will always highlight the negative aspects of crime victims issues. You can focus on the positive benefits from being part of the responders and service providers the Heroes! That reminds me of a community that had an annual Community Heroes Celebration luncheon. Businesses and other agencies submitted names of folks they knew supported the clients of the nonprofit in some way (direct services, donor, advocate, volunteer, etc.) The agency selected heroes to honor at the luncheon. The nominating groups (and others) bought tickets for the luncheon. The local newspaper covered the event and ran stories about the agency and the Heroes. The agency was able to get many parts of the event donated inkind from local business so they made a profit on the luncheon which they could use as unrestricted revenue.One very good model of a crime victim service agencys volunteer program is one funded a few years ago by OVC called Good Samaritans. See: http://www.ovc.gov/publications/infores/Good_Samaritans/pfv.html. The Foundation Center has some good resources for this, too: http://foundationcenter.org/getstarted/topical/youth.html
 
 
It appears that gvt funding and many grants are drying up for white collar victim assistance. Does anyone know of any new resources? Businesses are tightening belts. How do you reach family foundations?
 
1.  GH:Tamara
 Again, The Foundation Center is the best resource Ive seen for finding private funding. http://foundationcenter.org/findfunders If you cannot afford a subscription (which I find usually pays for itself very quickly), it is not uncommon to find a printed directory of this type in your local or regional library reference system. Librarians are great resources for grant writers. Web searches for organizations to which family foundations belong can be helpful but its a lot of work. In my region we have Philanthropy Northwest, which is coalition of private foundations. See: http://www.philanthropynw.org/s_pnw/index.asp I search their member list when Im compiling a target list to find potential funding partners.
 
 
How long should we keep grant records (proposal, reports, financial data, etc.) and what records are kept?
 
1.  GH:Tamara
 To answer this question, I picked up my favorite desk top reference notebook. Its a collection of the federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB) circulars. My federal grant expenditures are guided by A-122 and sometimes for our Tribes A-87. But my answer to this question I found in A-110, the uniform administrative requirements for grants and cooperative agreements with nonprofits. In subpart C, Section 53 it says we should keep our records three years from the date of submission of the final expenditure report. There are some exceptions. If you are not spending federal funds or if you are something other than a nonprofit entity, I would defer to the person who completes your tax form to guide you on your retention requirement. Heres a link to A-110: http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/circulars_default
 
 
I am on listserves which allow me to recieve information about grant opportunities, but often only two weeks in advance of the due date. As someone who wears many hats for the program, this doesn't leave me with enough time. How can I find out about grants relevant to my program ahead of time so that I have more time to write?
 
1.  Paul Hoffman
 If you think you might at some time apply for Federal funding thru Grants.gov, it makes sense to set your organization up with it ahead of time. The process to get your DUNS number and go through all the registration can take days. Doing this ahead of time, and renewing your registration yearly, will increase the chances that you can submit an application in time.
 
2.  GH:Tamara
 Do you subscribe to Grants.gov? The usual turn around time for federal grants we work with, from RFP to application due date, is 30-45 days. The most effective way to be prepared to submit with a short timeframe is to have a strong strategic plan with short- and long-term objectives. The actions steps to achieve the objectives are what you look to fund. With a strong strategic plan, clear goals, measurable objectives, you can cut and paste application sections. I find it is difficult to do a quick turnaround if were trying to develop a project to fulfill the funders requirements. Its better, I think, to have a well designed project plan that can be quickly and easily explained to funders who may be good investment partners.
 
 
I know that you have expertise on how small programs can use entreprenurial tactics to raise money in a sustainable way. Is it possible for you to touch on this today? Thank you!
 
1.  GH:Tamara
 Sure - this is the answer I gave in an earlier post...One note of caution before we talk about developing unrestricted revenue for nonprofits. If the nonprofit is tax exempt, 501(c)3, the IRS has some specific allowable and unallowable activities they outline in their Publication 598 Tax on Unrelated Business Income of Exempt Organizations (available at http://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/p598.pdf ). Your director, board and fiscal staff will want to become familiar with these guidelines as they start developing a plan to generate unrestricted revenue. Some successful ventures Ive seen in the past include using clothing donations from the community to open a thrift store that provides vouchers to clients and also sells to the public. Civic groups having annual fundraisers on behalf of the nonprofit such as one Kiwanis Club had a chicken BBQ every summer and the proceeds were dedicated to general cash donation to the domestic violence shelter. One nonprofit set up a payroll deduction for their employees. Each employee could give $1 or more every pay period to an unrestricted operating donation account. The agency used this money for staff development and recognition. Because they were a nonprofit, some of the employees were able to deduct their donation on their itemized tax return schedule. A large nonprofit that I work with has an annual art auction. Over the past ten years they have done a 5050 split saving part of the net proceeds and expending part. The savings added up to $200,000 this year and they started an endowment fund which will be invested. The earnings from the endowment will come back into the organization as unrestricted revenue because thats how their Board of Directors set it up.
 
 
As Chair of Fundraising w/ CVAC, I need tips on how and where to apply for a grant or grants to fund a legal clinic in an already dedicated office space.
 
1.  GH:Tamara
 First, start with a thorough project plan which outlines your goals, objectives and resource needs. This can guide you in where to look for funding. Your question prompts the budget reviewer in me to wonder if you are looking for funding for staff? Office space? Full program support? Depending on what your needs list is different funders might invest in the project. One of my favorite starting places for funding is the OJP website. See: http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov I also would talk to the legal aid folks in my area to explore potential partnerships. There are crime victims funds moving through many prosecutor andor Office of Attorneys General. They could be potential partners to help get your project funded. Another partnership resource that may be useful is your local Court Appointed Special Advocate program.
 
 
Is there some type of technical assistance available for people who are unable to produce a grant that can be funding? ie. CRIS from CDC although it is very difficult to get a referral if you are a non-funded CBO it is still possible. (There are grassroots organization out here with access to the constituents and ideas for services that can make positive impacts on the lives of women - specifically in the context of domestic violence, but do not have the technical skill to frame their idea to meet the requirements of funders.)
 
1.  Melva Florance
 Thank you for your reply. We founded a nonprofit organization in 2003 The LaStraw, (last straw) Inc. Our mission is to create an accesible network of human and social services empowering people living in low income areas to improve their quality of life. The organization has created opportunities for people living in low income areas, who are vested in the success of eliminating poverty, to create and action their own agenda. Creating volunteer opportunities is not enough though. Low income areas need jobs that pay living wages and with human and social services on the chopping block creating jobs in these fields seem to be the only way to save ourselves.
 
2.  GH: Tamara
 The list below is my go-to recommendation. There are also other resources in posts in this forum.Resources for Developing Collaborative Project & Grant Proposals1.From the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance, a very good primer on developing and writing grant proposals: http://njms.umdnj.edu/researchorsp/DevelopingAndWritingGrantProposals.htm 2.At grants.gov, a library with full details about applying for federal grants through their main system. It has tips, forms, and tutorials:http://www.grants.gov/applicantsresources.jsp 3.A simple five-step proposal writing process, in plain talk, from the Appalachian Regional Commission: http://www.arc.gov 4.Grant writing tip sheets from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Some information is specific to NIH funding opportunities. However there are excellent coaching ideas and additional links available from this site. http://grants.nih.gov/grants/grant_tips.htm 5.Developing Competitive SAMHSA Grant Applications. The manual was created to help grantees acquire the skills and resources needed to plan, write, and prepare a competitive grant application for SAMHSA funding. http://www.samhsa.gov/Grants/TA/index.aspx
 
 
We provide uncompensated victim services in a hospital setting, but find that our organization isn't as appealing to grantors as other direct victim services organizations. How can we position ourselves for support?
 
1.  GH: Tamara
 The first question I have is what kind of legaltax status do you have as an organization? Are you part of the hospitals programs or auxiliary? Do you have a have 501(c)3 status? Different funding will be available to you based on that status. If you are part of the hospital and it is a major one they often have internal foundations that will support special projects. What kind of media outreach are you doing about your program? Raising community awareness of your services will often cultivate donors. Who are your other community partners? Are your services forensic, advocacy, medical? Your funding opportunities will be found by targeting support from your collaborators.
 
 
We are overwhelmingly funding via state and federal grant funds - how do you go about securing private contributions in a sustaining/sustainable way to diversify your income portfolio?
 
1.  GH: Tamara
 One approach to diversifying your revenue streams is to first identify them What percentage is federal grants, state grants, contracts, donations, etc? Which are restricted? Which can be used for unrestricted expenses? Then have your board and executive staff analyze the data and make a recommendation as to what you want the revenue diversification to look like in 3 years. Make a plan to target efforts specifically to reaching the diversification goal you set. Being able to share your plan with private funders will probably help them buy in because they will see you are a smart investment for them.
 
 
I am always looking for good tools for managing grants, particularly finding a template that can serve as application timeline and then be re-purposed as project reports. Any suggestions?
 
1.  GH: Tamara
 The CFDA has a good outline process at this link: https://www.cfda.gov/downloads/CFDA_writing.pdf UNC has some terrific templates at this link: http://www.unc.edu/depts/wcweb/handouts/grant_proposals.html
 
 
I work with a supervised visitation program that also coordinates a local domestic violence task force team for local law enforcement and direct service provider groups. We are planning to apply for the safe havens grant from Dept of Justice: Office on Violence Against Women. We are hoping to open a visitation center catering to families involved with domestic violence and stalking. Do you have any advice or pointers that might help us secure this funding? Thanks so much!!
 
1.  GH: Tamara
 First of all, I wish you the best of luck in this endeavor. I worked with a DVT to fund and implement a supervised visitation exchange program about 10 years ago. This is what I learned. This program works very quickly reduce the number of protection order violations in a community. It is a lot of work to implement. We visited three other programs in our state before we wrote our program design. We involved law enforcement, parole and probation, the local judges and our domestic violence advocates. We also, early on, had a family therapist with experience working with children who witness domestic violence. This helped us see many perspectives for maintaining safety and wellness of our program participants. We partnered with the state child welfare agency because they had facilities available to us for a safe program site. Our proposal was strong and funded with a federal DOJ grant and lots of community resources. It was administered by the domestic violence services agency. The most challenging part was operational. Show in your application that you have worked through planning what your staffing will be. Outline the processes (and forms) that you will use. Be sure to note the matching or inkind of resources different disciplines in your community will contribute to your program. Another difficult part was the mandatory evaluation component of our project. The funder hired an external evaluator that was not familiar with us. If you will be doing evaluation, do as much planning for it up front that you can . Involve people who know your programs and services well. Success in delivery, I think, is founded in the strength of your pre-program planning.
 
 
In order to support our services, we have to rely on multiple funding sources, each with their own set of data requirements, often with different reporting time periods. This is so time consuming. Any suggestions on how to manage this?
 
1.  GH: Tamara
 The agency I work for manages over 60 grants/contracts with different budget cycles and diverse data requirements. I understand your challenge. We work on this by having a master list of what is due when and who is responsible for the program and fiscal data collection. We review this monthly, planning 30 and 90 days out to give assignments for which staff are held accountable. We also pre-screen applications for data requirements. If its too cumbersome, we try to negotiate with our funder about substituting with data that we already or can easily collect. Sometimes if we cant work it out that we, we request extra funding to hire the resources (internal or external) that are required to meet the extra effort needs. Occasionally, we get a college intern to help us with data for a project.
 
2.  Terresa
 I suggest using a couple of organizational tools. Use a laminated full year calendar - enter all due dates and color code by grant (for example: EOY on Sept 30 for grant A..in red; 1st qtr on April 15 for grant B..in blue). Also make a master Excel spreadsheet with all data that you need for all grants. Many grants will overlap in data needs and you can add in new data for new grants. You can color code those data elements that you only need for a particular grant (and then can quit collecting it when that grant ends). Update your spreadsheet monthly - or more often if you have staff to help you.
 
 
Where can a non-profit find grant writing workshops for it's advocates to seek out more funding opportunities? For our program these workshops would have to be free of charge.
 
1.  GH:Tamara
 There are some great on-line resources to train your self (and your partners) to develop and write grant proposals. Ive listed them below. In my experience, collaborative proposals are usually stronger than one person writing in isolation. You didnt mention the state you live in. Usually there are state-wide coalitions of DV groups. They sometimes sponsor grant writing workshops such as The Grantsmanship Institute. These are expensive so they often get a coalition grant to fund the training so small agencies can attend for free. Also, I've received a lot of excellent and free training from United Ways over the years. In the meantime, check out these sites. Resources for Developing Collaborative Project & Grant Proposals Proposals1.From the Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance, a very good primer on developing and writing grant proposals: http://njms.umdnj.edu/research/orsp/DevelopingAndWritingGrantProposals.htm 2.At grants.gov, a library with full details about applying for federal grants through their main system. It has tips, forms, and tutorials:http://www.grants.gov/applicantsresources.jsp 3.A simple five-step proposal writing process, in plain talk, from the Appalachian Regional Commission: http:www.arc.gov 4.Grant writing tip sheets from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Some information is specific to NIH funding opportunities. However there are excellent coaching ideas and additional links available from this site. http://grants.nih.gov/grants/grant_tips.htm 5.Developing Competitive SAMHSA Grant Applications. The manual was created to help grantees acquire the skills and resources needed to plan, write, and prepare a competitive grant application for SAMHSA funding. http://www.samhsa.gov/Grants/TA/index.aspx
 
 
I work for a state agency and we are looking for resources to supplement our programs for victims, offenders and offender families. Do you have any resources you could point us to? Also - what is the best way to learn how to write effective grants?
 
1.  GH: Tamara
 In these tough budget times, the best resources I can think of to suggest to your are collaborations with your community partners. Through respectful relationship with your local folks, you can leverage the full range of resources in your community. A planning framework might be: What resources to you need? Who are the experts in your community in providing resources to meet those needs? What is your relationship with each of those providers and how can you strengthen it? What is the common outcome of your mission with potential partners that you can focus on to collaborate? This is a good time to be mindful of the differences between cooperation, coordination and a true collaboration. Cooperation is two groups with different missions participating in the same project because they share a target market. Coordination is a bit more because they combine resources to reach the target but each maintains separate decision making. Collaboration is when mission outcomes are mutually-beneficial, resources and decision making is shared. This is a sustainable partnership approach.
 
 
How can individuals in the CJ field get the word out to help assist victims more?
 
1.  GH:Tamara
 Are you trying to do outreach to help victims access services? Are you trying to cultivate donors and volunteers? If you go to The Community Toolbox link, you will find AMAZING resources to help you. See: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/default.aspx
 
 
I am interested in starting a voluntourism nonprofit for young professionals and underprivileged youth. Are grants only given once 501(c)(3) status is achieved? If so what are some fundraising tips for fledgling NPOs that haven't received 501(c)(3) status?
 
1.  GH:Tamara
 Friend-raising is a term Ive heard recently to describe building a coalition of donors and volunteers for specific project support. Could you start a FaceBook page describing your efforts and then ask your FB friends to share it with their friends. For the young professionals, this type of viral electronic effort is proving successful. The underprivileged youth is a different target market. Do you have a YMCA or other youth-based project in your community. Meet with their staff to see if you have any common outcomes that could be the center of a collaborative effort which can build your project.
 
 
Hi Tamara, we are a nonprofit that often serves as lead agent for applications to fund collaborative projects. What's your advice on building coalitions that will follow through once funding is approved?
 
1.  GH:Tamara
 This is a great question. I do planning with program staff from five sovereign tribal governments. We are their nonprofit tribal consortium. Tribes follow OMB Circular A-87 for spending federal dollars. Our agency has to follow OMB Circular A-122. This can be a big challenge for both accountability and compliance. Weve learned a lot about implementation success. Two great tools are MOUs and MOAs. As we are designing a collaborative project, we have staff representatives from each of the participating tribes (groups) at the table. After each has agreed to what the project will be, we write up a Memorandum of Understanding that the leader of each program signs. For example, if there is a law enforcement officer at the planning table, the Chief of Police signs the MOU. If there is an advocate at the table, the DV Program Manager signs the MOU. After a project is funded, we write up Memorandums of Agreement. This, for us, serves as a legal agreement about who will do what. It sets up the appropriate subrecipient relationship if approval of budget expenditures and eligibility of program participants is going to a group outside of our agency. Our MOAS name specific staff to be held accountable for each deliverable and process. The MOAs are signed by our Executive Director, my self as CFO and by the tribal CEO (and sometimes Council Chair). This works well for us.
 
 
Is it best to be just factual in the narrative portion of a grant application or it is best to be more descriptive. Do they want a story or do they want just concrete facts.
 
1.  GH:Tamara
 You can check out advice from resource links Ive posted in other replies and Ill share one more. I learned this from a course I took from The Grantsmanship Institute. Ive used it successfully many times. In the very beginning of the narrative, I start with a statement of a general nature: Children learn what they live. Then I write a national-level statistic: The US DOJ reports one in every four girls is sexually assaulted. Then a state-level problem: Funding for sexual assault services in our state has been reduced by 65. Then a statement about what were doing about this: At **** agency, we provide sexual assault crisis response 24 hours a day, every day for every girl. As a grant reviewer, I find this approach compelling to get me to read the rest of the proposal.
 
 
What resources and direction would you have for consultants and volunteers that support work to grassroot community based organiztion on how to help them build capacity? What approach do you suggest in trying to help them get funding when they have no funding history? How can organizations prepare themselves better to be more effective in their work?
 
1.  GH: Tamara
 There are three things I can think of that might be useful for you. First, ensure that you have a Board, formal or advisory, that is diverse in its makeup. People with a variety of skills, backgrounds and experience with the population you are targeting for services. Engage them in planning. Have them determine what type of legal entity the organization will be. If you're going to be a nonprofit, apply for 501(c)3 status. This is the most-often funded type of CBO. Then check out the resources at The Community Toolbox. The key to success is good planning and you can find good tools to help you at: http://ctb.ku.edu/en/default.aspx
 
 
Could you offer some online tools to managing grants?
 
1.  GH:Tamara
 Often if your funder is a state or federal agency, it will have a technical assistance manual. Here are a couple of examples. The OJP website is one of the best resources I know to assist in the tasks youre asking about: http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/grants101 Each funding agency usually has a comprehensive guide to help you with managing the grant once its awarded. DOJ offers grant management training to grantees post award. Here is a resource from US DHHS: http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/fysb/content/grantsandfunding/managing.htm
 
 
Where should someone look for funding with program budgets less than $200K?
 
1.  GH:Tamara
 It would be helpful in answering to have a little more information. Is this your entire agency budget or one program in an agency? Are you trying to sustain this level of funding or are you looking to grow it? What types of services do you provide? Are you able to adequately meet needs or are there significant unmet needs? What potential collaborators are in your community that you might work with? All of this information can be used to help you analyze how to access funding and other resources to help you meet your objectives. There also might be information in other posts from this forum that you will find useful. Good luck!
 
2.  Howard Morton
 It depends on the focus of your services. Some grantors restrict their funding to certain areas of need. Where is your focus?
 
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