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American Indian/Alaska Native

  • Publications (24)
  • Resources (20)
  • Forum Discussions (5)
  • FAQs (4)
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Studies suggest that crime rates are much higher for American Indian tribes and Alaska Native groups compared to the national average. The Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings From the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey report from the National Institute of Justice shows that 83 percent of adults in this population has experienced some form of violence in their lifetime.


OVC helps victims in Indian Country by providing much-needed resources, improving and increasing services, identifying promising practices, and adapting and replicating successful programs in tribal communities throughout the nation. Additionally, OVC collaborates with other federal agencies to fund demonstration programs that help tribes and tribal organizations serve victims more efficiently.


OVC’s Tribal Multimedia Resources are designed to inform and assist victim service providers and allied professionals in their efforts to help crime victims in Indian Country.


The following organizations, publications, and related resources provide additional information on the issues facing American Indians/Alaska Natives.



OVC and OVC-Sponsored Publications

Vision 21: Tribal Victim Services Resource Mapping Project (July 2017) OVC, Fact Sheet, OVC Fact Sheets, NCJ 250876.
American Indians and Alaska Natives have the highest crime victimization rates in the Nation but often have difficulty connecting with existing services to help them recover from crime and abuse. This fact sheet discusses an OVC project to develop a web-based tool that will enable victims and service providers to quickly access information about critical services wherever they are seeking help.
PDF
Part Of the OVC Fact Sheets Series
 
Developing and Implementing a Response to Sexual Assault in Tribal Communities: A Summary of the Suggestions from the National Roundtable Discussion on Sexual Assault in Indian Country (April 2017) OVC, 39 pages, NCJ 250873.
This publication is a product of an OVC, Indian Health Service, and Office on Violence Against Women event in July 2016. The publication offers practical guidance to tribal governments who are interested in developing or enhancing their community’s response to sexual violence.
Abstract | PDF
 
State-Tribal Crime Victim Liaison Demonstration Program: Tribal Outreach To Establish Trust and Increase Awareness of Victim Services (December 2016) OVC, 17 pages, NCJ 249582.
This report discusses the outcome of a 3-year project through which the Oklahoma District Attorneys Council, Victim Services Division, supported a State-Tribal Crime Victim Liaison. This liaison provided outreach to Oklahoma American Indian victims regarding tribal victim assistance, grant opportunities, and crime victim compensation.
Abstract | PDF
 
Alcohol-Facilitated Sexual Assault in Indian Country (December 2016) OVC, OVC Videos, 3 pages, NCJ 250235.
This four-video series is designed for criminal justice personnel, victim advocates, and allied professionals who work with victims of sexual assault in Indian Country. The videos in this series seek to increase awareness about the prevalence of alcohol-facilitated sexual violence, enhance the investigation and prosecution of sexual violence, and provide best practices for responding to victims
Abstract | HTML
Part Of the OVC Videos Series
 
Partners in Justice - Bureau of Indian Affairs Victim Specialists (December 2016) OVC, OVC Videos, 2 pages, NCJ 250461.
This video presents an overview of the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Victim Specialist Program. The video, prepared by OVC and BIA, identifies some of the program’s successes and challenges providing services to victims of crime in Indian Country.
Abstract | HTML
Part Of the OVC Videos Series
 

OJP Publications

Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men - 2010 Findings From the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (June 2016) NIJ, Presentation, 15 pages, NCJ 250133.
This seminar provides the first set of estimates from a national large-scale survey of violence against women and men who identified themselves as American Indian or Alaska Native using detailed behaviorally specific questions on psychological aggression, coercive control and entrapment, physical violence, stalking, and sexual violence. These results are expected to raise awareness and understanding of violence experienced by American Indian and Alaska Native people.
Abstract | HTML (Transcript) | Video (01:22:02)
 
Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings From the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (May 2016) NIJ, Report, NIJ Research Report, 82 pages, NCJ 249736.
This report examines the prevalence of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men, using a large nationally representative sample from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). More specifically, it provides estimates of sexual violence, physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and psychological aggression by intimate partners. It also provides estimates of interracial and intraracial victimizations and briefly examines the impact of violence. Results should be used to raise awareness and understanding about violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men.

Part Of the NIJ Research Report Series Abstract | PDF
 
Attorney General's Advisory Committee on American Indian/Alaska Native Children Exposed to Violence: Ending Violence So Children Can Thrive (November 2014) OJJDP-Sponsored, Grant, 258 pages, NCJ 248500.
The recommendations are intended to serve as a blueprint for preventing American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) children's exposure to violence and for mitigating the negative effects experienced by Al/AN children exposed to violence across the U.S. and throughout Indian country.
Abstract | PDF | HTML (EPUB) | HTML (MOBI)
 
Final Report: Participatory Evaluation of the Tribal Victim Assistance Programs at the Lummi Nation and Passamaquoddy Tribe (August 2009) NIJ-Sponsored, Grant, 159 pages, NCJ 228190.
This report summarizes the results of process evaluations of two tribal victim assistance programs - the Lummi Victims of Crime Program in Washington State and the Passamaquoddy Tribal Victim Outreach Advocate Program in Maine - both of which are federally funded "on-reservation" victim assistance programs intended to provide permanent, accessible, and responsive crime-victim assistance services on tribal lands.
Abstract | PDF
 
Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and the Criminal Justice Response: What Is Known (2008) NIJ-Sponsored, Grant, 168 pages, NCJ 223691.
Based on a synthesis of the empirical literature and original data analyses, this report presents an overview of the epidemiology of violence against American-Indian and Alaska-Native women as well as a review of the criminal justice responses to this violence.
Abstract | PDF
 

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Studies suggest that crime rates are much higher for American Indian tribes and Alaska Native groups compared to the national average. The Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings From the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey report from the National Institute of Justice shows that 83 percent of adults in this population has experienced some form of violence in their lifetime.


OVC helps victims in Indian Country by providing much-needed resources, improving and increasing services, identifying promising practices, and adapting and replicating successful programs in tribal communities throughout the nation. Additionally, OVC collaborates with other federal agencies to fund demonstration programs that help tribes and tribal organizations serve victims more efficiently.


OVC’s Tribal Multimedia Resources are designed to inform and assist victim service providers and allied professionals in their efforts to help crime victims in Indian Country.


The following organizations, publications, and related resources provide additional information on the issues facing American Indians/Alaska Natives.



Studies suggest that crime rates are much higher for American Indian tribes and Alaska Native groups compared to the national average. The Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings From the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey report from the National Institute of Justice shows that 83 percent of adults in this population has experienced some form of violence in their lifetime.


OVC helps victims in Indian Country by providing much-needed resources, improving and increasing services, identifying promising practices, and adapting and replicating successful programs in tribal communities throughout the nation. Additionally, OVC collaborates with other federal agencies to fund demonstration programs that help tribes and tribal organizations serve victims more efficiently.


OVC’s Tribal Multimedia Resources are designed to inform and assist victim service providers and allied professionals in their efforts to help crime victims in Indian Country.


The following organizations, publications, and related resources provide additional information on the issues facing American Indians/Alaska Natives.



Each month the Nation's experts answer your questions about best practices in victim services. Below are upcoming and most recent session discussions in this topic:

On Nov 16 2016 at 2:00PM, Harlan Pruden, member of the Cree Nation and Managing Editor of TwoSpiritJournal.com, and Elton Naswood, of the Near to the Water People Clan and member of the Community Expert Advisory Council for the Indigenous HIV/AIDS Research Training , hosted a discussion on Serving Two-Spirit/LGBTQ Victims in Tribal Communities

On Nov 17 2015 at 2:00PM, Geri Wisner, Tribal Prosecutor for the Pawnee Nation and Wyandotte Tribe of Oklahoma, and Sarah Collins, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of South Dakota, hosted a discussion on Improving Federal Agency Response to Sexual Violence in Indian Country

On Nov 19 2014 at 2:00PM, Roe Bubar, J.D, Associate Professor at Colorado State University, and Leila Goldsmith, J.D., Child Advocacy Coordinator with the Tulalip Tribes of Washington, hosted a discussion on Forensic Interviewing in Tribal Communities

On Dec 18 2013 at 2:00PM, Charity White, M.S.W., is the Kumeyaay Family Services Director for Southern Indian Health Council, Inc, hosted a discussion on Coordinating SANEs-SARTs in Indian Country

On Nov 19 2012 at 2:00PM, Leslie Hagen, Department of Justice's first National Indian Country Coordinator, hosted a discussion on Tribal Law and Order Act: Crime Victims in Indian Country

Studies suggest that crime rates are much higher for American Indian tribes and Alaska Native groups compared to the national average. The Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings From the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey report from the National Institute of Justice shows that 83 percent of adults in this population has experienced some form of violence in their lifetime.


OVC helps victims in Indian Country by providing much-needed resources, improving and increasing services, identifying promising practices, and adapting and replicating successful programs in tribal communities throughout the nation. Additionally, OVC collaborates with other federal agencies to fund demonstration programs that help tribes and tribal organizations serve victims more efficiently.


OVC’s Tribal Multimedia Resources are designed to inform and assist victim service providers and allied professionals in their efforts to help crime victims in Indian Country.


The following organizations, publications, and related resources provide additional information on the issues facing American Indians/Alaska Natives.



Is it possible to receive a set of the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) Voices of Victims videos?
The Voices of Victims videos listed below are no longer available to order: Voices of Victims:... Read More

What resources are available to assist American Indian/Alaskan Native crime victims?
For information to assist American Indian/Alaska Native crime victims, visit the Specific Population... Read More

How can I order OVC publications and products?
Many OVC publications and products are available in hardcopy and can be ordered from the National Cr... Read More

What is Vision 21?
The Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services initiative was launched by OVC in fall 2010 to expand th... Read More

More FAQs

Studies suggest that crime rates are much higher for American Indian tribes and Alaska Native groups compared to the national average. The Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings From the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey report from the National Institute of Justice shows that 83 percent of adults in this population has experienced some form of violence in their lifetime.


OVC helps victims in Indian Country by providing much-needed resources, improving and increasing services, identifying promising practices, and adapting and replicating successful programs in tribal communities throughout the nation. Additionally, OVC collaborates with other federal agencies to fund demonstration programs that help tribes and tribal organizations serve victims more efficiently.


OVC’s Tribal Multimedia Resources are designed to inform and assist victim service providers and allied professionals in their efforts to help crime victims in Indian Country.


The following organizations, publications, and related resources provide additional information on the issues facing American Indians/Alaska Natives.



No funding records found relevant to this topic.

More Funding Opportunities

Studies suggest that crime rates are much higher for American Indian tribes and Alaska Native groups compared to the national average. The Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings From the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey report from the National Institute of Justice shows that 83 percent of adults in this population has experienced some form of violence in their lifetime.


OVC helps victims in Indian Country by providing much-needed resources, improving and increasing services, identifying promising practices, and adapting and replicating successful programs in tribal communities throughout the nation. Additionally, OVC collaborates with other federal agencies to fund demonstration programs that help tribes and tribal organizations serve victims more efficiently.


OVC’s Tribal Multimedia Resources are designed to inform and assist victim service providers and allied professionals in their efforts to help crime victims in Indian Country.


The following organizations, publications, and related resources provide additional information on the issues facing American Indians/Alaska Natives.



Publications

OVC and OVC-Sponsored Publications

Vision 21: Tribal Victim Services Resource Mapping Project (July 2017) OVC, Fact Sheet, OVC Fact Sheets, NCJ 250876. American Indians and Alaska Natives have the highest crime victimization rates in the Nation but often have difficulty connecting with existing services to help them recover from crime and abuse. This fact sheet discusses an OVC project to develop a web-based tool that will enable victims and service providers to quickly access information about critical services wherever they are seeking help.
PDF
Part Of the OVC Fact Sheets Series
 
Developing and Implementing a Response to Sexual Assault in Tribal Communities: A Summary of the Suggestions from the National Roundtable Discussion on Sexual Assault in Indian Country (April 2017) OVC, 39 pages, NCJ 250873. This publication is a product of an OVC, Indian Health Service, and Office on Violence Against Women event in July 2016. The publication offers practical guidance to tribal governments who are interested in developing or enhancing their community’s response to sexual violence.
Abstract | PDF
 
State-Tribal Crime Victim Liaison Demonstration Program: Tribal Outreach To Establish Trust and Increase Awareness of Victim Services (December 2016) OVC, 17 pages, NCJ 249582. This report discusses the outcome of a 3-year project through which the Oklahoma District Attorneys Council, Victim Services Division, supported a State-Tribal Crime Victim Liaison. This liaison provided outreach to Oklahoma American Indian victims regarding tribal victim assistance, grant opportunities, and crime victim compensation.
Abstract | PDF
 
Alcohol-Facilitated Sexual Assault in Indian Country (December 2016) OVC, OVC Videos, 3 pages, NCJ 250235. This four-video series is designed for criminal justice personnel, victim advocates, and allied professionals who work with victims of sexual assault in Indian Country. The videos in this series seek to increase awareness about the prevalence of alcohol-facilitated sexual violence, enhance the investigation and prosecution of sexual violence, and provide best practices for responding to victims
Abstract | HTML
Part Of the OVC Videos Series
 
Partners in Justice - Bureau of Indian Affairs Victim Specialists (December 2016) OVC, OVC Videos, 2 pages, NCJ 250461. This video presents an overview of the U.S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Victim Specialist Program. The video, prepared by OVC and BIA, identifies some of the program’s successes and challenges providing services to victims of crime in Indian Country.
Abstract | HTML
Part Of the OVC Videos Series
 

OJP Publications

Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men - 2010 Findings From the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (June 2016) NIJ, Presentation, 15 pages, NCJ 250133. This seminar provides the first set of estimates from a national large-scale survey of violence against women and men who identified themselves as American Indian or Alaska Native using detailed behaviorally specific questions on psychological aggression, coercive control and entrapment, physical violence, stalking, and sexual violence. These results are expected to raise awareness and understanding of violence experienced by American Indian and Alaska Native people.
Abstract | HTML (Transcript) | Video (01:22:02)
 
Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men: 2010 Findings From the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (May 2016) NIJ, Report, NIJ Research Report, 82 pages, NCJ 249736. This report examines the prevalence of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men, using a large nationally representative sample from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS). More specifically, it provides estimates of sexual violence, physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and psychological aggression by intimate partners. It also provides estimates of interracial and intraracial victimizations and briefly examines the impact of violence. Results should be used to raise awareness and understanding about violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men.
Part Of the NIJ Research Report Series
Abstract | PDF
 
Attorney General's Advisory Committee on American Indian/Alaska Native Children Exposed to Violence: Ending Violence So Children Can Thrive (November 2014) OJJDP-Sponsored, Grant, 258 pages, NCJ 248500. The recommendations are intended to serve as a blueprint for preventing American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) children's exposure to violence and for mitigating the negative effects experienced by Al/AN children exposed to violence across the U.S. and throughout Indian country.
Abstract | PDF | HTML (EPUB) | HTML (MOBI)
 
Final Report: Participatory Evaluation of the Tribal Victim Assistance Programs at the Lummi Nation and Passamaquoddy Tribe (August 2009) NIJ-Sponsored, Grant, 159 pages, NCJ 228190. This report summarizes the results of process evaluations of two tribal victim assistance programs - the Lummi Victims of Crime Program in Washington State and the Passamaquoddy Tribal Victim Outreach Advocate Program in Maine - both of which are federally funded "on-reservation" victim assistance programs intended to provide permanent, accessible, and responsive crime-victim assistance services on tribal lands.
Abstract | PDF
 
Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and the Criminal Justice Response: What Is Known (2008) NIJ-Sponsored, Grant, 168 pages, NCJ 223691. Based on a synthesis of the empirical literature and original data analyses, this report presents an overview of the epidemiology of violence against American-Indian and Alaska-Native women as well as a review of the criminal justice responses to this violence.
Abstract | PDF
 

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Related Resources

OVC Funded Resources

Office for Victims of Crime (OVC): American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner-Sexual Assault Response Team (SANE-SART) Initiative
OVC established the AI/AN SANE-SART Initiative in 2010 to address the comprehensive needs of tribal victims of sexual violence, with the ultimate goal of institutionalizing sustainable and evidence-based practices that meet the needs of tribal communities.
 
Office for Victims of Crime Training and Technical Assistance Center (OVC TTAC): Tribal Victim Assistance
This OVC TTAC resource provides information and tools to support the efforts of tribal victim advocates, prosecutors, law enforcement officers, and others to develop a victim-centered response to crime victims in tribal communities.
 
Unified Solutions Tribal Community Development Group
Unified Solutions is dedicated to partnering with American Indian/Alaska Native communities to end violent crime, heal from the effects of trauma, and promote resilience.
 

Federal Resources

National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS)
Sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs, NCJRS offers information on victimology and victim assistance, criminal justice, juvenile justice, information to support research, policy, and program development worldwide. NCJRS supplies the victim services field with resources, publications, and program information. The NCJRS library collection includes more than 30,000 resources relevant to the field.
 
NCJRS: Justice in Indian Country Special Feature
This special feature provides publications and resources on specific topics involving Indian Country, including courts, law enforcement, victims, and more.
 
Office of Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse
This office was created to coordinate alcohol and substance abuse efforts among the American Indian and Alaskan Native communities and federal agencies as called for by the Tribal Law and Order Act. This office will work, in collaboration with the Department of the Interior and the Department of Justice, on determining the scope of the ongoing problem -- identifying and assessing national, state, tribal, and local alcohol and substance abuse programs and resources; and creating standards for programs.
 
Office on Violence Against Women (OVW)
OVW, a component of the U.S. Department of Justice, provides federal leadership to reduce violence against women and to administer justice for and strengthen services to all victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.
 
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS): Indian Health Service
IHS is responsible for providing federal health services to American Indians and Alaska Natives.
 

Non-Governmental Resources

National American Indian Court Judges Association (NAICJA)
NAICJA is devoted primarily to the support of American Indian and Alaska Native justice systems through education, information sharing, and advocacy.
 
National Child Welfare Resource Center for Tribes
The National Child Welfare Resource Center for Tribes (NRC4Tribes) is one of the new resource centers within the Children's Bureau Training and Technical Assistance National Network. NRC4Tribes joins the Children's Bureau's Child Welfare Training and Technical Assistance Network which is designed to improve child welfare systems and to support States and Tribes in achieving sustainable, systemic change that results in greater safety, permanency, and well-being for children, youth, and families.
 
National Indian Justice Center (NIJC)
NIJC is an independent national resource for tribal courts. The Center designs and delivers legal education, research, and technical assistance programs to help improve tribal courts systems and the administration of justice in Indian Country.
 
National Institute of Justice (NIJ): Tribal Crime and Justice
This section of the NIJ Web site provides information and resources relating to the tribal justice system and includes information on violence and victimization on tribal lands.
 
Tribal Court Clearinghouse
A resource for tribal justice systems and individuals involved in improving justice in Indian Country, this clearinghouse provides information on a variety of areas, including federal legislation, tribal court decisions, and tribal court funding.
 

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Web Forum Discussions

Each month the Nation's experts answer your questions about best practices in victim services. Below are upcoming and most recent session discussions in this topic:

On Nov 16 2016 at 2:00PM, Harlan Pruden, member of the Cree Nation and Managing Editor of TwoSpiritJournal.com, and Elton Naswood, of the Near to the Water People Clan and member of the Community Expert Advisory Council for the Indigenous HIV/AIDS Research Training , hosted a discussion on Serving Two-Spirit/LGBTQ Victims in Tribal Communities

On Nov 17 2015 at 2:00PM, Geri Wisner, Tribal Prosecutor for the Pawnee Nation and Wyandotte Tribe of Oklahoma, and Sarah Collins, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of South Dakota, hosted a discussion on Improving Federal Agency Response to Sexual Violence in Indian Country

On Nov 19 2014 at 2:00PM, Roe Bubar, J.D, Associate Professor at Colorado State University, and Leila Goldsmith, J.D., Child Advocacy Coordinator with the Tulalip Tribes of Washington, hosted a discussion on Forensic Interviewing in Tribal Communities

On Dec 18 2013 at 2:00PM, Charity White, M.S.W., is the Kumeyaay Family Services Director for Southern Indian Health Council, Inc, hosted a discussion on Coordinating SANEs-SARTs in Indian Country

On Nov 19 2012 at 2:00PM, Leslie Hagen, Department of Justice's first National Indian Country Coordinator, hosted a discussion on Tribal Law and Order Act: Crime Victims in Indian Country


FAQs

Is it possible to receive a set of the Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) Voices of Victims videos?
The Voices of Victims videos listed below are no longer available to order: Voices of Victims:... Read More

What resources are available to assist American Indian/Alaskan Native crime victims?
For information to assist American Indian/Alaska Native crime victims, visit the Specific Population... Read More

How can I order OVC publications and products?
Many OVC publications and products are available in hardcopy and can be ordered from the National Cr... Read More

What is Vision 21?
The Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services initiative was launched by OVC in fall 2010 to expand th... Read More

Back to Top


Funding

No funding records found relevant to this topic.

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EventsDirectoryE-Mail UpdatesRSS
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National Calendar of Crime Victim Assistance-Related Events
Upcoming Event(s)
National Conference on Health and Domestic Violence
San Francisco, CA
09/26/2017-09/28/2017

National Center for Victims of Crime National Training Institute
Portland, OR
12/05/2017-12/07/2017

Online Directory of Crime Victims Services.