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Homicide Survivors/Co-victims

  • Publications (19)
  • Resources (17)
  • Forum Discussions (4)
  • FAQs (8)
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A homicide survivor or co-victim is anyone (such as a spouse or partner, child, sibling, extended family member, or friend) who has been impacted by the death of a loved one by homicide. The trauma and grief they experience can cause emotional scars that last a lifetime. They may also experience other kinds of loss, such as a loss of income in the family or the loss of a sense of safety and security. Homicide survivors and co-victims are an underserved and sparsely researched population of crime victims with unique and distinct problems. They need specialized resources in the aftermath of the homicide to lessen its long-term psychological impact, and to help them cope with their grief while restoring control in their lives.

The following resources provide guidance on communicating with and responding to homicide survivors and co-victims.


OVC and OVC-Sponsored Publications

OVC Report to the Nation 2013, Fiscal Years 2011-2012: Transforming Today's Vision into Tomorrow's Reality (June 2013) OVC, Report, 0 pages, NCJ 242598.
OVC's Report to the Nation summarizes the progress made in upholding crime victims' rights and providing high-quality services to victims, survivors, and communities during fiscal years 2011−2012. The online report highlights innovative programs and victim-centered initiatives, summarizes financial support to states and U.S. territories, and provides insight into OVC's strategic efforts to address both emerging and enduring challenges in order to expand and enhance victim assistance throughout the Nation.
Abstract | HTML
 
Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services Final Report (May 2013) OVC, Report, 63 pages, NCJ 239957.
The Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services initiative was launched by OVC in fall 2010 to expand the vision and impact of the crime victim assistance field. This Final Report provides a set of findings and broad recommendations, informed by stakeholder forums and literature reviews, that form a framework for strategic, transformative change. The Final Report outlines ways the field can overcome the obstacles it faces and change how it meets victims' needs and addresses those who perpetrate crime.
Abstract | PDF (Full Report) | PDF (Summary & Recommendations) | PDF (At a Glance Fact Sheet)
 
National Victim Assistance Academy Resource Paper: Homicide (September 2012) OVC, OVC Training, 23 pages, NCJ 240569.
This Resource Paper is part of a series of National Victim Assistance Academy (NVAA) Track 1: Foundation-Level Training documents covering eight topics. This paper includes statistics, definitions, impact/effects on victims, effective responses, and additional information designed to educate entry-level professionals and volunteers. Visit www.ovcttac.gov for additional NVAA training materials.
Abstract | PDF
Part Of the OVC Training Series
 
OVC HELP Series for Crime Victims (June 2012) OVC
This series of nine brochures features information and resources for victims of crime and victim service professionals on the topics of assault, child abuse, domestic violence, homicide, impaired driving, robbery, sexual violence, and stalking. Each brochure defines a type of victimization; discusses what to do if you are a victim of this crime and where to go for help; and provides resources for more information and assistance.
HTML
 
Serving Survivors of Homicide Victims During Cold Case Investigations: A Guide for Developing a Law Enforcement Protocol (August 2011) OVC-Sponsored, Grant, 55 pages, NCJ 236082.
Through funding from OVC, the National Sheriffs' Association, Justice Solutions, and the National Organization of Parents Of Murdered Children, Inc., developed this publication which identifies and discusses how law enforcement agencies can develop protocols for best serving survivors of homicide during cold case investigation.
Abstract | PDF
 

OJP Publications

Nation's Two Measures of Homicide (July 2014) BJS, Report, 4 pages, NCJ 247060.
This report summarizes the United States' two national data collection systems related to homicide: the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Supplementary Homicide Reports and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Fatal Injury Reports. This report describes the strengths, limitations, differences, and complementary aspects of each program.
PDF | TEXT
 
Homicide in the U.S. Known to Law Enforcement, 2011 (December 2013) BJS, Report, 18 pages, NCJ 243035.
This report presents data on homicide trends from 1992 to 2011. The report describes homicide patterns and trends by age, sex, and race of the victim. It explores weapon use, with a focus on trends in firearm use and homicide trends by city size.
PDF | TEXT
 
Firearm Violence, 1993-2011 (May 2013) BJS, Report, BJS Special Reports, 28 pages, NCJ 241730.
This report presents trends on the number and rate of fatal and nonfatal firearm violence from 1993 to 2011. The report examines incident and victim demographic characteristics of firearm violence, including the type of firearm used; victim's race, age, and sex; and incident location. The report also examines changes over time in the percentages of nonfatal firearm crimes by injury, reporting to the police, and the use of firearms in self-defense.

Part Of the BJS Special Reports Series Abstract | PDF | TEXT
 
Workplace Violence Against Government Employees, 1994-2011 (April 2013) BJS, Report, BJS Special Reports, 19 pages, NCJ 241349.
This report presents information on both nonfatal and fatal forms of violence in the workplace against government employees, based on the Bureau of Justice Statistics' National Crime Victimization Survey and the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries.

Part Of the BJS Special Reports Series Abstract | PDF | TEXT
 
Violent Victimization Committed by Strangers, 1993-2010 (December 2012) BJS, Report, BJS Special Reports, 19 pages, NCJ 239424.
This report presents findings on the rates and levels of violent victimization committed by offenders who were strangers to the victims, including homicide, rape, sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, and simple assault.

Part Of the BJS Special Reports Series Abstract | PDF | TEXT
 

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A homicide survivor or co-victim is anyone (such as a spouse or partner, child, sibling, extended family member, or friend) who has been impacted by the death of a loved one by homicide. The trauma and grief they experience can cause emotional scars that last a lifetime. They may also experience other kinds of loss, such as a loss of income in the family or the loss of a sense of safety and security. Homicide survivors and co-victims are an underserved and sparsely researched population of crime victims with unique and distinct problems. They need specialized resources in the aftermath of the homicide to lessen its long-term psychological impact, and to help them cope with their grief while restoring control in their lives.

The following resources provide guidance on communicating with and responding to homicide survivors and co-victims.


A homicide survivor or co-victim is anyone (such as a spouse or partner, child, sibling, extended family member, or friend) who has been impacted by the death of a loved one by homicide. The trauma and grief they experience can cause emotional scars that last a lifetime. They may also experience other kinds of loss, such as a loss of income in the family or the loss of a sense of safety and security. Homicide survivors and co-victims are an underserved and sparsely researched population of crime victims with unique and distinct problems. They need specialized resources in the aftermath of the homicide to lessen its long-term psychological impact, and to help them cope with their grief while restoring control in their lives.

The following resources provide guidance on communicating with and responding to homicide survivors and co-victims.


Each month the Nation's experts answer your questions about best practices in victim services. Below are upcoming and most recent session discussions in this topic:

On Aug 18 2010 at 2:00PM, Diane Alexander, Senior Advisor of Justice Solutions, and Dan Levey, National President, The National Organization of Parents Of Murdered Children, Inc, and Tim Woods, Director of the Research, Development, and Grants Division at the National Sheriffs' Association, hosted a discussion on Serving Survivors of Homicide Victims During Cold Case Investigations

On Nov 8 2007 at 2:00PM, Carroll Ann Ellis, Director of the Victim Services Division of the Fairfax County Police Department, hosted a discussion on Working with Survivors of Homicide and Other Traumatic Events

On May 23 2007 at 2:00PM, Laurie Caldwell, Senior Agent with the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division, and Bob Lowery, City Manager and Team Adam member, hosted a discussion on Addressing Cases With Missing or Unidentified Victims

On Sep 7 2005 at 2:00PM, Nancy Ruhe, Executive Director of the National Organization of Parents Of Murdered Children, Inc, hosted a discussion on Assisting Parents of Murdered Children

A homicide survivor or co-victim is anyone (such as a spouse or partner, child, sibling, extended family member, or friend) who has been impacted by the death of a loved one by homicide. The trauma and grief they experience can cause emotional scars that last a lifetime. They may also experience other kinds of loss, such as a loss of income in the family or the loss of a sense of safety and security. Homicide survivors and co-victims are an underserved and sparsely researched population of crime victims with unique and distinct problems. They need specialized resources in the aftermath of the homicide to lessen its long-term psychological impact, and to help them cope with their grief while restoring control in their lives.

The following resources provide guidance on communicating with and responding to homicide survivors and co-victims.


How many people are murdered in the United States each year?
Year by year homicide statistics can be accessed via the Homicide Trends in the United States sectio... Read More

How many homicide victims were killed with a handgun?
Statistics on homicides committed with a handgun are available in the Bureau of Justice Statistics (... Read More

I am crime victim, how can I get help?
Help in your area is available from your State/Local Victim Compensation and Assistance programs. As... Read More

Are there any statistics on the number of children that are kidnapped and then murdered?
Statistics on the number of children that are kidnapped and then murdered can be found in the Office... Read More

How can I order OVC publications and products?
Many OVC publications and products are available in hardcopy and can be ordered from the National Cr... Read More

More FAQs

A homicide survivor or co-victim is anyone (such as a spouse or partner, child, sibling, extended family member, or friend) who has been impacted by the death of a loved one by homicide. The trauma and grief they experience can cause emotional scars that last a lifetime. They may also experience other kinds of loss, such as a loss of income in the family or the loss of a sense of safety and security. Homicide survivors and co-victims are an underserved and sparsely researched population of crime victims with unique and distinct problems. They need specialized resources in the aftermath of the homicide to lessen its long-term psychological impact, and to help them cope with their grief while restoring control in their lives.

The following resources provide guidance on communicating with and responding to homicide survivors and co-victims.


No funding records found relevant to this topic.

More Funding Opportunities

A homicide survivor or co-victim is anyone (such as a spouse or partner, child, sibling, extended family member, or friend) who has been impacted by the death of a loved one by homicide. The trauma and grief they experience can cause emotional scars that last a lifetime. They may also experience other kinds of loss, such as a loss of income in the family or the loss of a sense of safety and security. Homicide survivors and co-victims are an underserved and sparsely researched population of crime victims with unique and distinct problems. They need specialized resources in the aftermath of the homicide to lessen its long-term psychological impact, and to help them cope with their grief while restoring control in their lives.

The following resources provide guidance on communicating with and responding to homicide survivors and co-victims.


Publications

OVC and OVC-Sponsored Publications

OVC Report to the Nation 2013, Fiscal Years 2011-2012: Transforming Today's Vision into Tomorrow's Reality (June 2013) OVC, Report, 0 pages, NCJ 242598. OVC's Report to the Nation summarizes the progress made in upholding crime victims' rights and providing high-quality services to victims, survivors, and communities during fiscal years 2011−2012. The online report highlights innovative programs and victim-centered initiatives, summarizes financial support to states and U.S. territories, and provides insight into OVC's strategic efforts to address both emerging and enduring challenges in order to expand and enhance victim assistance throughout the Nation.
Abstract | HTML
 
Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services Final Report (May 2013) OVC, Report, 63 pages, NCJ 239957. The Vision 21: Transforming Victim Services initiative was launched by OVC in fall 2010 to expand the vision and impact of the crime victim assistance field. This Final Report provides a set of findings and broad recommendations, informed by stakeholder forums and literature reviews, that form a framework for strategic, transformative change. The Final Report outlines ways the field can overcome the obstacles it faces and change how it meets victims' needs and addresses those who perpetrate crime.
Abstract | PDF (Full Report) | PDF (Summary & Recommendations) | PDF (At a Glance Fact Sheet)
 
National Victim Assistance Academy Resource Paper: Homicide (September 2012) OVC, OVC Training, 23 pages, NCJ 240569. This Resource Paper is part of a series of National Victim Assistance Academy (NVAA) Track 1: Foundation-Level Training documents covering eight topics. This paper includes statistics, definitions, impact/effects on victims, effective responses, and additional information designed to educate entry-level professionals and volunteers. Visit www.ovcttac.gov for additional NVAA training materials.
Abstract | PDF
Part Of the OVC Training Series
 
OVC HELP Series for Crime Victims (June 2012) OVC This series of nine brochures features information and resources for victims of crime and victim service professionals on the topics of assault, child abuse, domestic violence, homicide, impaired driving, robbery, sexual violence, and stalking. Each brochure defines a type of victimization; discusses what to do if you are a victim of this crime and where to go for help; and provides resources for more information and assistance.
HTML
 
Serving Survivors of Homicide Victims During Cold Case Investigations: A Guide for Developing a Law Enforcement Protocol (August 2011) OVC-Sponsored, Grant, 55 pages, NCJ 236082. Through funding from OVC, the National Sheriffs' Association, Justice Solutions, and the National Organization of Parents Of Murdered Children, Inc., developed this publication which identifies and discusses how law enforcement agencies can develop protocols for best serving survivors of homicide during cold case investigation.
Abstract | PDF
 

OJP Publications

Nation's Two Measures of Homicide (July 2014) BJS, Report, 4 pages, NCJ 247060. This report summarizes the United States' two national data collection systems related to homicide: the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Supplementary Homicide Reports and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Fatal Injury Reports. This report describes the strengths, limitations, differences, and complementary aspects of each program.
PDF | TEXT
 
Homicide in the U.S. Known to Law Enforcement, 2011 (December 2013) BJS, Report, 18 pages, NCJ 243035. This report presents data on homicide trends from 1992 to 2011. The report describes homicide patterns and trends by age, sex, and race of the victim. It explores weapon use, with a focus on trends in firearm use and homicide trends by city size.
PDF | TEXT
 
Firearm Violence, 1993-2011 (May 2013) BJS, Report, BJS Special Reports, 28 pages, NCJ 241730. This report presents trends on the number and rate of fatal and nonfatal firearm violence from 1993 to 2011. The report examines incident and victim demographic characteristics of firearm violence, including the type of firearm used; victim's race, age, and sex; and incident location. The report also examines changes over time in the percentages of nonfatal firearm crimes by injury, reporting to the police, and the use of firearms in self-defense.
Part Of the BJS Special Reports Series
Abstract | PDF | TEXT
 
Workplace Violence Against Government Employees, 1994-2011 (April 2013) BJS, Report, BJS Special Reports, 19 pages, NCJ 241349. This report presents information on both nonfatal and fatal forms of violence in the workplace against government employees, based on the Bureau of Justice Statistics' National Crime Victimization Survey and the Bureau of Labor Statistics' Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries.
Part Of the BJS Special Reports Series
Abstract | PDF | TEXT
 
Violent Victimization Committed by Strangers, 1993-2010 (December 2012) BJS, Report, BJS Special Reports, 19 pages, NCJ 239424. This report presents findings on the rates and levels of violent victimization committed by offenders who were strangers to the victims, including homicide, rape, sexual assault, robbery, aggravated assault, and simple assault.
Part Of the BJS Special Reports Series
Abstract | PDF | TEXT
 

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Related Resources

Federal Resources

Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS): Homicide Trends in the United States
This BJS tool provides data at the state-level related to homicides, including the number of victims, demographic data (age, race, and gender), and weapon involvement.
 
Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS): Victims
Summary findings, publications, selected statistics: Victim characteristics, BJS Criminal Victimization in the United States—annual detailed statistical tables, BJS Homicide Trends in the United States, and the National Crime Victimization Survey.
 
National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS)
Sponsored by the Office of Justice Programs, NCJRS offers information on victimology and victim assistance, criminal justice, juvenile justice, information to support research, policy, and program development worldwide. NCJRS supplies the victim services field with resources, publications, and program information. The NCJRS library collection includes more than 30,000 resources relevant to the field.
 
Office for Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP): Easy Access to the FBI's Supplementary Homicide Reports (EZASHR)
EZASHR provides access to more than twenty years of national and State data on homicide victims and known homicide offenders, including information on the age, sex, and race of victims and offenders, the victim-offender relationship, and the type of weapon used.
 

Non-Governmental Resources

Compassionate Friends
This nonprofit, self-help support organization offers friendship and understanding to bereaved parents, grandparents, and siblings. TCF provides an opportunity for sharing with and learning from other grievers.
 
National Center For Child Death Review
The National Center for Child Death Review promotes, supports and enhances child death review methodology and activities at the community, state, and national levels.
 
National Fallen Firefighters Foundation
Through its Survivor Support Network and other specialized programs, this foundation increases services available to families of fallen firefighters.
 
National Organization of Parents of Murdered Children, Inc. (POMC)
POMC provides the ongoing emotional support needed to help parents and other survivors facilitate the reconstruction of a "new life" and to promote healthy grief resolution.
 
Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors, Inc. (TAPS)
TAPS is a nonprofit organization staffed by, and providing services to, all those who have lost a loved one while serving in the Armed Forces.
 

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Web Forum Discussions

Each month the Nation's experts answer your questions about best practices in victim services. Below are upcoming and most recent session discussions in this topic:

On Aug 18 2010 at 2:00PM, Diane Alexander, Senior Advisor of Justice Solutions, and Dan Levey, National President, The National Organization of Parents Of Murdered Children, Inc, and Tim Woods, Director of the Research, Development, and Grants Division at the National Sheriffs' Association, hosted a discussion on Serving Survivors of Homicide Victims During Cold Case Investigations

On Nov 8 2007 at 2:00PM, Carroll Ann Ellis, Director of the Victim Services Division of the Fairfax County Police Department, hosted a discussion on Working with Survivors of Homicide and Other Traumatic Events

On May 23 2007 at 2:00PM, Laurie Caldwell, Senior Agent with the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division, and Bob Lowery, City Manager and Team Adam member, hosted a discussion on Addressing Cases With Missing or Unidentified Victims

On Sep 7 2005 at 2:00PM, Nancy Ruhe, Executive Director of the National Organization of Parents Of Murdered Children, Inc, hosted a discussion on Assisting Parents of Murdered Children


FAQs

How many people are murdered in the United States each year?
Year by year homicide statistics can be accessed via the Homicide Trends in the United States sectio... Read More

How many homicide victims were killed with a handgun?
Statistics on homicides committed with a handgun are available in the Bureau of Justice Statistics (... Read More

I am crime victim, how can I get help?
Help in your area is available from your State/Local Victim Compensation and Assistance programs. As... Read More

Are there any statistics on the number of children that are kidnapped and then murdered?
Statistics on the number of children that are kidnapped and then murdered can be found in the Office... Read More

How can I order OVC publications and products?
Many OVC publications and products are available in hardcopy and can be ordered from the National Cr... Read More

Back to Top


Funding

No funding records found relevant to this topic.

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National Calendar of Crime Victim Assistance-Related Events
Upcoming Event(s)
28th Annual Conference of Parents Of Murdered Children, Inc. (POMC)
Rochester, MN
08/14/2014-08/17/2014

National Center for Victims of Crime 2014 National Training Institute
Miami, FL
09/17/2014-09/19/2014

14th National Indian Nations Conference: Justice for Victims of Crime
Palm Springs, CA
12/11/2014-12/14/2014

Online Directory of Crime Victims Services.